National Wealth Service for Dorset health chiefs

MEDICAL DIRECTOR : Laurence Mynors-Wallis (£195,000)

MEDICAL DIRECTOR : Laurence Mynors-Wallis (£195,000)

First published in Campaigns Dorset Echo: Photograph of the Author by , Chief Reporter

SALARIES paid to NHS chiefs in Dorset have come under fire from pressure groups and protestors.

They warned that TWENTY-EIGHT frontline nurses could be employed for the price of four high-ranking NHS chiefs.

The wages were branded as ‘disproportionate’ and ‘absurd’ in the face of an economic crisis – and as Dorset County Hospital faces a £7.5million deficit.

The hospital’s board is expected shortly to announce where 200 jobs will be cut, what services could be dropped and whether such measures as a pay freeze will be introduced.

Figures released in 2008-2009 financial reports show that Dr Laurence Mynors-Wallis – the medical director for Dorset Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust – is paid between £185,000 and £195,000 a year.

He will be one of the NHS chiefs that will have to justify his wages to Gordon Brown after a warning that public sector organisations paying anyone more than £150,000 a year would be expected to justify their salaries to ministers and the public.

The former chief executive of Dorset County Hospital Jan Bergman was paid a salary last year of £140,000 to £145,000 before he resigned.

Former chairman Robin SeQueira, who stepped down before the cuts were announced, earned £40,000 for just three-and-a-half to four days’ work a week.

Dorset PCT director David Phillips, who earns £115,000, is a joint appointment between NHS Dorset and Dorset County Council.

An entry-level nurse in the UK is paid £20,710 a year – which means that almost ten nurses could be employed for the cost of one medical director.

Breast cancer patient Wendy Nightingale and protestor against the cuts at DCH said: “If only the services received more of this money that’s going on these wages we might not have such problems.

“I’m shocked to hear the amount these chiefs are being paid when nurses aren’t being replaced.”

A 45-year-old nurse, who wished not to be named, from Dorset County Hospital added: “I think it’s disgusting.

“Extra nurses would make a real difference on a ward right now where staff are having to make cuts to services that you wouldn’t believe. I think these chiefs should be taking at least half-pay until things work out instead of this disproportionate and absurd wage.”

Political director of the Taypayers’ Alliance Susie Squire slammed the high salaries awarded to NHS chiefs in Dorset and said in some cases the wages are ‘rewarding failure’.

She said: “In Dorset it shows a very troubled picture of healthcare spending priorities in Dorset.

“Frankly, healthcare workers such as frontline nurses that are low paid have had their wages frozen or services cut and these executives at the top end of the scale are enjoying hefty pay packets and pay rises that are entirely unjustifiable.

“In this economic crisis at the moment all the money available should go to patients and frontline services and not at NHS fat cats.”

She added: “Perhaps some of them have generated results, but against the backdrop of the economy and all the cuts, it is unacceptable and not something seen across other public services.

“Also, when trusts like Dorset are in so much debt it is nonsense to be rewarding failure instead of going to services – which is what the taxpayer pays for and what they deserve.”

The Dorset Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust provides mental health care across the county.

Dr Laurence Mynors-Wallis joined the trust in 1997 as a consultant psychiatrist, which pays a salary of £150,000-£155,000, and has been a medical director since 2000.

A spokesman for the trust stated that he receives a nationally-determined consultant’s salary as well as a separate remuneration amount of £35,000 to £45,000 for his position as medical director. There was no one available for comment at the Dorset County Hospital.

Comments (10)

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10:15am Wed 9 Dec 09

Techie says...

If I had written this story I'd be very wary of quoting the Taxpayers Alliance verbatim - there are lots of questions about how virtuous they themselves are.

The Echo haven't made overly clear that these are three different NHS organisations, all doing different things with different structures as a result.

Once again, this is over-emotive and lazy reporting, encouraging people to form opinion without adequately providing all the facts. The huge banner headline "SICKENING" is surely not appropriate in this instance. This story is the sum of looking at three annual reports and ringing round a few windbags for some reaction quotes. That is all.

Yes, pay at this level in the NHS needs to be looked at and revised where necessary. But it needs to be done properly, unfuelled by lazy attempts at newsmaking.
If I had written this story I'd be very wary of quoting the Taxpayers Alliance verbatim - there are lots of questions about how virtuous they themselves are. The Echo haven't made overly clear that these are three different NHS organisations, all doing different things with different structures as a result. Once again, this is over-emotive and lazy reporting, encouraging people to form opinion without adequately providing all the facts. The huge banner headline "SICKENING" is surely not appropriate in this instance. This story is the sum of looking at three annual reports and ringing round a few windbags for some reaction quotes. That is all. Yes, pay at this level in the NHS needs to be looked at and revised where necessary. But it needs to be done properly, unfuelled by lazy attempts at newsmaking. Techie
  • Score: 0

1:21pm Wed 9 Dec 09

praha says...

Health care workers are scared to be named in any complaint in case 'the powers' make life even more difficult.'No one availaible'
Health care workers are scared to be named in any complaint in case 'the powers' make life even more difficult.'No one availaible' praha
  • Score: 0

4:28pm Wed 9 Dec 09

gerbil112 says...

It is often quoted that, in order to draw higher management away from the private sector, the NHS/Local Councils have to pay competitive salaries to people at that level.


At the other end of the scale, the workers (Nurses etc), are on fixed pay-bands and have traditionally done the work for low pay because of dedication and commitment.


It would be interesting to find out if high-flying managers would be prepared to work for the NHS/Council at a rate well below the private sector, because of commitment and love of the service that they provide!
It is often quoted that, in order to draw higher management away from the private sector, the NHS/Local Councils have to pay competitive salaries to people at that level. At the other end of the scale, the workers (Nurses etc), are on fixed pay-bands and have traditionally done the work for low pay because of dedication and commitment. It would be interesting to find out if high-flying managers would be prepared to work for the NHS/Council at a rate well below the private sector, because of commitment and love of the service that they provide! gerbil112
  • Score: 0

8:56pm Wed 9 Dec 09

Bevan boyo says...

Well done Miriam Phillips and the Echo for digging this up and putting it up front and centre.
If this starts a debate over public purse expenditure in the NHS you have done your job.
After all ...this my money!
Well done Miriam Phillips and the Echo for digging this up and putting it up front and centre. If this starts a debate over public purse expenditure in the NHS you have done your job. After all ...this my money! Bevan boyo
  • Score: 0

7:44am Thu 10 Dec 09

The obscure says...

I agree that this is lazy journalism. Perhaps the journo should have set alongside salaries, the responsibilities people have.
Gerbil - I am not high flying but do work in the public sector. I could earn double in the private sector but doing good for others is more important to me than money.
I agree that this is lazy journalism. Perhaps the journo should have set alongside salaries, the responsibilities people have. Gerbil - I am not high flying but do work in the public sector. I could earn double in the private sector but doing good for others is more important to me than money. The obscure
  • Score: 0

11:55am Thu 10 Dec 09

gerbil112 says...

The obscure wrote:
I agree that this is lazy journalism. Perhaps the journo should have set alongside salaries, the responsibilities people have. Gerbil - I am not high flying but do work in the public sector. I could earn double in the private sector but doing good for others is more important to me than money.
I applaud you, Obscure, I too work in the public sector (NHS) at the "ground level", delivering immediate health care in the same envronment for over 30 years. I was told early on in my career that I would have to be prepared to be ambitious and be prepared to move around to "get on". Unfortunately it is not the case that one can progress very easily within the NHS. Some may disagree, Nursing Officers are still nurse-trained, but higher management tends to come from outside the NHS.


Over the years I have seen the higher tiers of management increasing in numbers many fold. Instead of coming up through the ranks, as traditional progression, I have seen management coming in from industry (private sector) with very little knowledge of the running of an acute health service.


Some may say that this is good, as it means that decisions can be made that do not rely upon guilt when cutting back on services at the sharp end, the point of delivery. Decisions can be made purely based on cold, hard, financial terms. And look where it gets us!
[quote][p][bold]The obscure[/bold] wrote: I agree that this is lazy journalism. Perhaps the journo should have set alongside salaries, the responsibilities people have. Gerbil - I am not high flying but do work in the public sector. I could earn double in the private sector but doing good for others is more important to me than money.[/p][/quote]I applaud you, Obscure, I too work in the public sector (NHS) at the "ground level", delivering immediate health care in the same envronment for over 30 years. I was told early on in my career that I would have to be prepared to be ambitious and be prepared to move around to "get on". Unfortunately it is not the case that one can progress very easily within the NHS. Some may disagree, Nursing Officers are still nurse-trained, but higher management tends to come from outside the NHS. Over the years I have seen the higher tiers of management increasing in numbers many fold. Instead of coming up through the ranks, as traditional progression, I have seen management coming in from industry (private sector) with very little knowledge of the running of an acute health service. Some may say that this is good, as it means that decisions can be made that do not rely upon guilt when cutting back on services at the sharp end, the point of delivery. Decisions can be made purely based on cold, hard, financial terms. And look where it gets us! gerbil112
  • Score: 0

12:17pm Thu 10 Dec 09

pd7 says...

People like this dont exist in real world industry as the companies would just go bust.

That could be why they work for NHS.

But do not compare them to industry leaders , they are not in the same ball park.
People like this dont exist in real world industry as the companies would just go bust. That could be why they work for NHS. But do not compare them to industry leaders , they are not in the same ball park. pd7
  • Score: 0

1:13pm Thu 10 Dec 09

weymouthfox says...

Now we know where some of that £7 million deficit went. The story of DCH is too many chiefs, not enough indians and now we discover the chiefs are being paid obscene amounts of money. Many of us have no confidence in the directors and managers that has got DCH into this dire situation. It is a good hospital with wonderful staff that has been woefully mismanaged by too many highly-paid chiefs. I know- I used to work there!
Now we know where some of that £7 million deficit went. The story of DCH is too many chiefs, not enough indians and now we discover the chiefs are being paid obscene amounts of money. Many of us have no confidence in the directors and managers that has got DCH into this dire situation. It is a good hospital with wonderful staff that has been woefully mismanaged by too many highly-paid chiefs. I know- I used to work there! weymouthfox
  • Score: 0

10:53pm Thu 10 Dec 09

The obscure says...

Good post gerbil
I have worked closely with the MHD for many years. The biggest issue is fast track graduate management trainees who think that they are being clever. Where do you think all the daft ideas come from at the sept of health?.
These people are well meaning and pleasant enough but as they have never seen a patient they are not grounded in reality.
Good post gerbil I have worked closely with the MHD for many years. The biggest issue is fast track graduate management trainees who think that they are being clever. Where do you think all the daft ideas come from at the sept of health?. These people are well meaning and pleasant enough but as they have never seen a patient they are not grounded in reality. The obscure
  • Score: 0

9:53am Tue 15 Dec 09

Antony Stanley says...

Oliver Letwin MP has organised two public meetings coming up in Dorchester about the finances at DCH. The Trust have to come up with a plan soon and tell us about services and jobs etc. That plan will probably be out in January. The first meeting is an update before the plan is known (but with Trust Governors present) whereas the second gathering should be a bigger meeting at the Corn Exchange when the plan is known..

PUBLIC MEETINGS:

An Update meeting (Trust Governors will be present)

This Friday 18th December at 7.30pm

Dorset Youth Association (Hall)
Lubbecke Way
Dorchester
DT1 1QL

A meeting to discuss the Trust’s plan
Friday 15th January at 7.30pm
Corn Exchange
North Square
Dorchester
Oliver Letwin MP has organised two public meetings coming up in Dorchester about the finances at DCH. The Trust have to come up with a plan soon and tell us about services and jobs etc. That plan will probably be out in January. The first meeting is an update before the plan is known (but with Trust Governors present) whereas the second gathering should be a bigger meeting at the Corn Exchange when the plan is known.. PUBLIC MEETINGS: An Update meeting (Trust Governors will be present) This Friday 18th December at 7.30pm Dorset Youth Association (Hall) Lubbecke Way Dorchester DT1 1QL A meeting to discuss the Trust’s plan Friday 15th January at 7.30pm Corn Exchange North Square Dorchester Antony Stanley
  • Score: 0

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