Update: Dorset's air ambulance back in the air after fault fixed

Dorset Echo: Dorset air ambulance is fully operational Dorset air ambulance is fully operational

THE Dorset and Somerset Air Ambulance has been given the all clear to fly.

It was grounded at the end of last week along with a fleet of the same model of helicopter as a precaution when an issue arose in one of the aircraft in another part of the county.

A technical fault was then discovered on the Dorset helicopter.

Engineers have now rectified the problem and the helicopter was declared fully operational at 10.50am today.

The EC135 is also the model of helicopter that crashed on a pub in Glasgow, killing ten people.

An initial report from the Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) issued this week said there was ''no evidence of major mechanical disruption of either engine'' of the Police Scotland helicopter as it returned from an operation in Dalkeith, Midlothian, on the night of the crash.

Comments (4)

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10:39am Fri 13 Dec 13

fastjet says...

The main evening news said it was a problem with the fuel gauges. As an ex engineer I am surprised that these items arent calibrated like the military ones.Surely when you put in 300 ltrs of AVGAS and your guage reads 1/2 full and no more will go in then. you know you havs a problem. Most modern helicopters have fuel management systems that also tell the pilot the same info.Hope it all gets sorted. The Air Ambulance is a vital life saver.
Condolences to the families that lost love ones R.I. P.
The main evening news said it was a problem with the fuel gauges. As an ex engineer I am surprised that these items arent calibrated like the military ones.Surely when you put in 300 ltrs of AVGAS and your guage reads 1/2 full and no more will go in then. you know you havs a problem. Most modern helicopters have fuel management systems that also tell the pilot the same info.Hope it all gets sorted. The Air Ambulance is a vital life saver. Condolences to the families that lost love ones R.I. P. fastjet

11:54am Fri 13 Dec 13

rjimmer says...

Perhaps the Glasgow crash chopper also had the same problem, hence it's silent descent.
Perhaps the Glasgow crash chopper also had the same problem, hence it's silent descent. rjimmer

10:20pm Fri 13 Dec 13

Laadeeda says...

rjimmer wrote:
Perhaps the Glasgow crash chopper also had the same problem, hence it's silent descent.
Not going to second guess the outcome of the investigation but if eye witness reports are anything to go by the 'drop' indicates something quiet traumatic. With the river Clyde not far away I'm sure the pilot, if he had the ability to fly the aircraft would have elected to fly into the river to minimise casualties.

Defective gauges rarely result in accidents such as the G/Gow crash. More a control malfunction or god forbid a unconscious pilot!!!!
[quote][p][bold]rjimmer[/bold] wrote: Perhaps the Glasgow crash chopper also had the same problem, hence it's silent descent.[/p][/quote]Not going to second guess the outcome of the investigation but if eye witness reports are anything to go by the 'drop' indicates something quiet traumatic. With the river Clyde not far away I'm sure the pilot, if he had the ability to fly the aircraft would have elected to fly into the river to minimise casualties. Defective gauges rarely result in accidents such as the G/Gow crash. More a control malfunction or god forbid a unconscious pilot!!!! Laadeeda

10:12am Sat 14 Dec 13

X Old Bill says...

My understanding is that the fault which was identified was that the low fuel warning was showing but that the gauge was showing adequate fuel - The gauge was apparently accurate and the warning was misleading.

The initial report on the Glasgow helo crash states that at least one engine was running and that there was adequate fuel on board, I think the figure was 93 litres recovered from the tanks.

Therefore there is no apparent connection, apart from being the same aircraft type.
My understanding is that the fault which was identified was that the low fuel warning was showing but that the gauge was showing adequate fuel - The gauge was apparently accurate and the warning was misleading. The initial report on the Glasgow helo crash states that at least one engine was running and that there was adequate fuel on board, I think the figure was 93 litres recovered from the tanks. Therefore there is no apparent connection, apart from being the same aircraft type. X Old Bill

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