Dorset County Council plans 'radical review' of adult social care

Dorset Echo: RADICAL: Jill Haynes RADICAL: Jill Haynes

DORSET County Council is planning to transform the way it delivers adult social care in a bid to save £7million.

The directorate is to carry out a ‘radical review’ of all its operations with a focus on helping more people live independently.

Cabinet member for adult social care Jill Haynes said services would be redesigned under the banner of ‘Pathways of Independence’ to meet the challenges of the future.

She told a meeting of the council’s cabinet: “Only a radical review of all our functions will help us prepare for the future.”

Coun Haynes added: “The vision is to support people to live independently for as long as possible, to reduce demand for health and adult social care and to promote health and wellbeing.”

She said service users and carers would help shape the way services are delivered in the future and the council would also be embracing assistive technologies and putting a greater emphasis on prevention services.

The council will also look at setting up a local authority trading company to deliver services on the council’s behalf.

Coun Haynes said: “It is obvious that the current system, both the practice and culture, is not sustainable given the scale of financial reductions.”

Council leader Spencer Flower said the work being done to transform adult social care was a good example of the way the whole authority needed to change to meet future challenges.

Cabinet member for corporate resources Robert Gould added: “It is a crucial piece of work in where we are going and I think the team ought to be commended in what they have done so far and supported in developing this.”

Chief executive Debbie Ward said: “This project is actually critical for the whole authority.”

Cabinet member for children’s services Toni Coombs said that, given the sensitive nature of care services and the likely reaction to any proposed changes, it was important to communicate clearly with all those affected throughout the process.

Coun Haynes assured her colleague that a communication plan was one of the first pieces of work that was being carried out as part of the review.

CHIEF officer at Age UK Dorchester Di Lawrence praised a number of the principles outlined in the council’s new approach to adult social care.

She welcomed the council’s plans to increase prevention services and avoiding sending people to critical or residential care but warned it could take some initial investment.

Mrs Lawrence said: “Obviously we welcome any potential investment in prevention services for older people but there is an awful lot of work that needs to be done to prevent people from needing critical or substantial services.

“We would welcome any move in that direction, whether the county council has the up front funding to make that investment before they realise that saving is a moot point.”

Mrs Lawrence also welcome the fact that the council appeared to be engaging with service providers and users as it moved forward with the process.

She said: “I would say they have taken steps over the last few months to try and be a more listening organisation, which is obviously welcome but the proof of the pudding in all that is going to be whether the older person in the street is really starting to see any change in what is available for them.”

Comments (5)

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9:18am Fri 20 Dec 13

dave.flowers says...

So this is privatizing of social services going through the back door, How many times do we here that older people need extra care NOT left on their own for 23 hours a day, only seeing people when the carers come in for an hour a day.
As for the children's services, how long will it be before schools become privatized.
This is what the council is planning.
So this is privatizing of social services going through the back door, How many times do we here that older people need extra care NOT left on their own for 23 hours a day, only seeing people when the carers come in for an hour a day. As for the children's services, how long will it be before schools become privatized. This is what the council is planning. dave.flowers

9:23am Fri 20 Dec 13

JamesYoung says...

dave.flowers wrote:
So this is privatizing of social services going through the back door, How many times do we here that older people need extra care NOT left on their own for 23 hours a day, only seeing people when the carers come in for an hour a day.
As for the children's services, how long will it be before schools become privatized.
This is what the council is planning.
Nah, this is all about independent living. Giving people freedom and dignity.

Granted, the end result is that old people get left to rot. But it sounds nice.
[quote][p][bold]dave.flowers[/bold] wrote: So this is privatizing of social services going through the back door, How many times do we here that older people need extra care NOT left on their own for 23 hours a day, only seeing people when the carers come in for an hour a day. As for the children's services, how long will it be before schools become privatized. This is what the council is planning.[/p][/quote]Nah, this is all about independent living. Giving people freedom and dignity. Granted, the end result is that old people get left to rot. But it sounds nice. JamesYoung

3:19pm Fri 20 Dec 13

dkh says...

Please remember this is not just about the elderly but some of our potentially more vulnerable the disabled a number of council run day centers have limited money to buy things for activities, things are getting close to the god old days of herd the most vulnerable people in society into a room if they are lucky they may get to watch tv
Please remember this is not just about the elderly but some of our potentially more vulnerable the disabled a number of council run day centers have limited money to buy things for activities, things are getting close to the god old days of herd the most vulnerable people in society into a room if they are lucky they may get to watch tv dkh

10:02pm Fri 20 Dec 13

smilealoft44 says...

More cuts and poor service. Could we not save money by putting the people who cannot look after themselves asleep.
More cuts and poor service. Could we not save money by putting the people who cannot look after themselves asleep. smilealoft44

5:49pm Mon 23 Dec 13

JACKC says...

Independent living is a joke! I know of someone who has fallen at home several times, and despite having to call out the paramedics every time as this person cannot get up off the floor by themselves.....has to wait until after Christmas before any input/help with aids. Let's just hope they don't end up in hospital in the meantime. Once again the vulnerable are going to suffer, not just the elderly. I hope the previous comment wasn't serious? I am saving up for an account in Switzerland as that seems to be the only way I would have a say on how I go. I certainly don't want to be left with just two visits a day to get me up and put me to bed - what quality of life is that? and sometimes delivered by workers who are in a hurry with no personal interest in their job. I agree with the comment that this scheme will need a considerable investment if it is to be successful - but I am very doubtful the figures needed will be met. I think liaison with the experts - i.e. the ones looking after these vulnerable groups should be paramount, instead of the number crunchers making decisions on peoples' lives.
Independent living is a joke! I know of someone who has fallen at home several times, and despite having to call out the paramedics every time as this person cannot get up off the floor by themselves.....has to wait until after Christmas before any input/help with aids. Let's just hope they don't end up in hospital in the meantime. Once again the vulnerable are going to suffer, not just the elderly. I hope the previous comment wasn't serious? I am saving up for an account in Switzerland as that seems to be the only way I would have a say on how I go. I certainly don't want to be left with just two visits a day to get me up and put me to bed - what quality of life is that? and sometimes delivered by workers who are in a hurry with no personal interest in their job. I agree with the comment that this scheme will need a considerable investment if it is to be successful - but I am very doubtful the figures needed will be met. I think liaison with the experts - i.e. the ones looking after these vulnerable groups should be paramount, instead of the number crunchers making decisions on peoples' lives. JACKC

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