UPDATE: Concerns over dead animals washed up on beach

Dorset Echo: The clean-up on Chesil Beach. Picture by Izzy Imset The clean-up on Chesil Beach. Picture by Izzy Imset

A MAJOR beach clean has seen two tonnes of rubbish and a number of dead animals removed from Chesil Beach.

Concerns were raised for public health when Portlanders spotted the body of a dead cow among tonnes of plastic and other litter which appeared following a major storm on Friday.

Authorities and volunteers worked throughout today to remove the carcasses.

Bulldozers and diggers were also used at on the scene to begin restructuring work, which will ensure that functioning flood defences are in place for the future.

Council staff, Environment Agency workers, green campaigners and residents are continuing to clean the beach with a major effort planned for this Sunday.

Izzy Imset, of diving group Underwater Explorers, runs the company's voluntary initiative Chesil Beach Watch.

He said: “Normally it would take two or three days to get all this rubbish on the beach, but this all came in one tide on Friday, in a sort of flash pollution.

“More than two tonnes of rubbish have now been removed, including the dead carcasses.”

Storm Wallace, environmental campaigner, said that local businesses have donated 12 skips for use on Sunday's big beach clean.

She said: “The Environment Agency workers have been restructuring parts of the beach behind the skate park to make sure the flood defence is not damaged.

“They have been bulldozing a tiny part of the beach but the main repair work won't begin until after all of the rubbish is removed.”

Streetscene manager Karyn Punchard said: “We are grateful for the efforts of volunteers who collected the debris that was washed up on Chesil Beach and Portland following the recent storms.”

Parents Amanda and Sean Green, of Courtlands, stopped taking their four-year-old son to visit the beach.

Amanda said: “I'm an animal lover and it's just upsetting to see. I certainly didn't want my son seeing that.

“There were also at least three dolphins washing around in the surf, and one has been quite badly battered by the waves.”

LOCAL environmental campaigner Storm Wallace has organised a Chesil Beach cleanup on Sunday.
All are urged to get involved and should meet at Quiddles Cafe at 10.30am.

Comments (20)

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11:20am Tue 14 Jan 14

smilealoft44 says...

Back to the old chestnut THATS NOT OUR JOB! Cut the crap and get the bodies moved!
Back to the old chestnut THATS NOT OUR JOB! Cut the crap and get the bodies moved! smilealoft44

11:36am Tue 14 Jan 14

IslandJim1 says...

Honestly, where have the Echo been finding the Portland people to supply the quotes over the last couple of week! First we had people who had chosen to live next to the sea in a known flood area, but couldn't comprehend that every know and then there house may flood. Now we have people who cant believe that every know and then dead sea things may be washed up on a beach, and instead of seeing it as a useful learning tool for there 4 year old (I'm not suggesting they should be poking it with a stick "Look its a sea cow") there treating it like an unholy monstrosity not to looked upon by innocent eyes. Maybe an explanation, and acceptance of nature would be better rather than trying to shield yourself and others from the world around you.
Honestly, where have the Echo been finding the Portland people to supply the quotes over the last couple of week! First we had people who had chosen to live next to the sea in a known flood area, but couldn't comprehend that every know and then there house may flood. Now we have people who cant believe that every know and then dead sea things may be washed up on a beach, and instead of seeing it as a useful learning tool for there 4 year old (I'm not suggesting they should be poking it with a stick "Look its a sea cow") there treating it like an unholy monstrosity not to looked upon by innocent eyes. Maybe an explanation, and acceptance of nature would be better rather than trying to shield yourself and others from the world around you. IslandJim1

12:02pm Tue 14 Jan 14

shy talk says...

“Parents Amanda and Sean Green, of Courtlands, said they have stopped taking their four-year-old son to visit the beach. Amanda said: “I'm an animal lover and it's just upsetting to see. I certainly don't want my son seeing that”

Take him to McDonald’s for a beefburger instead then. Chisel Beach is 18 miles long so plenty of choice of where to go.

Totally agree IslandJim1.
“Parents Amanda and Sean Green, of Courtlands, said they have stopped taking their four-year-old son to visit the beach. Amanda said: “I'm an animal lover and it's just upsetting to see. I certainly don't want my son seeing that” Take him to McDonald’s for a beefburger instead then. Chisel Beach is 18 miles long so plenty of choice of where to go. Totally agree IslandJim1. shy talk

12:20pm Tue 14 Jan 14

Rocksalt says...

IslandJim1 wrote:
Honestly, where have the Echo been finding the Portland people to supply the quotes over the last couple of week! First we had people who had chosen to live next to the sea in a known flood area, but couldn't comprehend that every know and then there house may flood. Now we have people who cant believe that every know and then dead sea things may be washed up on a beach, and instead of seeing it as a useful learning tool for there 4 year old (I'm not suggesting they should be poking it with a stick "Look its a sea cow") there treating it like an unholy monstrosity not to looked upon by innocent eyes. Maybe an explanation, and acceptance of nature would be better rather than trying to shield yourself and others from the world around you.
All of the quotes I read from Chesil residents suggested that they were perfectly well aware that the area might flood. What they did say, in some cases, was that there hadn't been a flood since they moved in. That is not the same as not comprehending that every now and then their house might flood.

In the meantime, I suggest that any parent shield their child from reading your comment less they are influenced by the poor spelling and punctuation.
[quote][p][bold]IslandJim1[/bold] wrote: Honestly, where have the Echo been finding the Portland people to supply the quotes over the last couple of week! First we had people who had chosen to live next to the sea in a known flood area, but couldn't comprehend that every know and then there house may flood. Now we have people who cant believe that every know and then dead sea things may be washed up on a beach, and instead of seeing it as a useful learning tool for there 4 year old (I'm not suggesting they should be poking it with a stick "Look its a sea cow") there treating it like an unholy monstrosity not to looked upon by innocent eyes. Maybe an explanation, and acceptance of nature would be better rather than trying to shield yourself and others from the world around you.[/p][/quote]All of the quotes I read from Chesil residents suggested that they were perfectly well aware that the area might flood. What they did say, in some cases, was that there hadn't been a flood since they moved in. That is not the same as not comprehending that every now and then their house might flood. In the meantime, I suggest that any parent shield their child from reading your comment less they are influenced by the poor spelling and punctuation. Rocksalt

12:37pm Tue 14 Jan 14

IslandJim1 says...

Rocksalt wrote:
IslandJim1 wrote:
Honestly, where have the Echo been finding the Portland people to supply the quotes over the last couple of week! First we had people who had chosen to live next to the sea in a known flood area, but couldn't comprehend that every know and then there house may flood. Now we have people who cant believe that every know and then dead sea things may be washed up on a beach, and instead of seeing it as a useful learning tool for there 4 year old (I'm not suggesting they should be poking it with a stick "Look its a sea cow") there treating it like an unholy monstrosity not to looked upon by innocent eyes. Maybe an explanation, and acceptance of nature would be better rather than trying to shield yourself and others from the world around you.
All of the quotes I read from Chesil residents suggested that they were perfectly well aware that the area might flood. What they did say, in some cases, was that there hadn't been a flood since they moved in. That is not the same as not comprehending that every now and then their house might flood.

In the meantime, I suggest that any parent shield their child from reading your comment less they are influenced by the poor spelling and punctuation.
Well done for picking up on my intentional spelling mistakes, unfortunately for one reason or another its not my strong point, and ashamedly I rely heavily on spell-check, so if I get a word muddled rather than wrong I don't always pick it up, but again thank you for pointing it out. I will however support my punctuation which in my above statement is fine. Anyway enough about my short comings and back to the story at hand. Which is not for me so much about the flooding, but people's unacceptable of things that are perfectly common place, such as sea creatures on a beach. As a child and even now I am fascinated by anything washed up, because I was allowed to see and accept it. Cuttle fish, dryed dog sharks, mermaids purses and yes DEAD THINGS such as dolphins and even whales (the salt pans off Grove point). I was allows to see and experience the world, and as a result I am knowledgeable about it, acceptive and fascinated by it and not scared of it. Which in my view is not how a child will end up if they are not allowed to see thins as they really are.
[quote][p][bold]Rocksalt[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]IslandJim1[/bold] wrote: Honestly, where have the Echo been finding the Portland people to supply the quotes over the last couple of week! First we had people who had chosen to live next to the sea in a known flood area, but couldn't comprehend that every know and then there house may flood. Now we have people who cant believe that every know and then dead sea things may be washed up on a beach, and instead of seeing it as a useful learning tool for there 4 year old (I'm not suggesting they should be poking it with a stick "Look its a sea cow") there treating it like an unholy monstrosity not to looked upon by innocent eyes. Maybe an explanation, and acceptance of nature would be better rather than trying to shield yourself and others from the world around you.[/p][/quote]All of the quotes I read from Chesil residents suggested that they were perfectly well aware that the area might flood. What they did say, in some cases, was that there hadn't been a flood since they moved in. That is not the same as not comprehending that every now and then their house might flood. In the meantime, I suggest that any parent shield their child from reading your comment less they are influenced by the poor spelling and punctuation.[/p][/quote]Well done for picking up on my intentional spelling mistakes, unfortunately for one reason or another its not my strong point, and ashamedly I rely heavily on spell-check, so if I get a word muddled rather than wrong I don't always pick it up, but again thank you for pointing it out. I will however support my punctuation which in my above statement is fine. Anyway enough about my short comings and back to the story at hand. Which is not for me so much about the flooding, but people's unacceptable of things that are perfectly common place, such as sea creatures on a beach. As a child and even now I am fascinated by anything washed up, because I was allowed to see and accept it. Cuttle fish, dryed dog sharks, mermaids purses and yes DEAD THINGS such as dolphins and even whales (the salt pans off Grove point). I was allows to see and experience the world, and as a result I am knowledgeable about it, acceptive and fascinated by it and not scared of it. Which in my view is not how a child will end up if they are not allowed to see thins as they really are. IslandJim1

2:25pm Tue 14 Jan 14

Tinker2 says...

Everything washes up in the cove, or 'dead mans cove' as it used to be called. The sea will reclaim the bodies, no need to fuss.
If anyone is upset at seeing dead animals, well then they should get a reality check, or otherwise become vegitarians?
Everything washes up in the cove, or 'dead mans cove' as it used to be called. The sea will reclaim the bodies, no need to fuss. If anyone is upset at seeing dead animals, well then they should get a reality check, or otherwise become vegitarians? Tinker2

2:31pm Tue 14 Jan 14

Bob Goulding says...

Do we know if the dead cow was tagged? Do we know where it came from and if there is any risk of spreading bovine or other diseases? Are we sure that it is safe to dispose of it without taking special precautions? Probably a job for specialists (DEFRA perhaps)?
Do we know if the dead cow was tagged? Do we know where it came from and if there is any risk of spreading bovine or other diseases? Are we sure that it is safe to dispose of it without taking special precautions? Probably a job for specialists (DEFRA perhaps)? Bob Goulding

3:49pm Tue 14 Jan 14

cj07589 says...

Big deal! what an absolute non-story, there are far more important priorities than whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses it's called nature! nature will decompose the carcuss and returning the materials, minerals back to the sea and land.
Perhaps Amanda and Sean should have taken this opportunity to explain to their son that life runs its course and death is a very natural part of that cycle. Often is the case where negatives are initially perceived there are actually great opportunities to be had, as a young lad I would had found this fascinating and much more topical than sitting in a biology classroom on a winter day.
Big deal! what an absolute non-story, there are far more important priorities than whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses it's called nature! nature will decompose the carcuss and returning the materials, minerals back to the sea and land. Perhaps Amanda and Sean should have taken this opportunity to explain to their son that life runs its course and death is a very natural part of that cycle. Often is the case where negatives are initially perceived there are actually great opportunities to be had, as a young lad I would had found this fascinating and much more topical than sitting in a biology classroom on a winter day. cj07589

4:31pm Tue 14 Jan 14

Bob Goulding says...

cj07589 wrote:
Big deal! what an absolute non-story, there are far more important priorities than whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses it's called nature! nature will decompose the carcuss and returning the materials, minerals back to the sea and land.
Perhaps Amanda and Sean should have taken this opportunity to explain to their son that life runs its course and death is a very natural part of that cycle. Often is the case where negatives are initially perceived there are actually great opportunities to be had, as a young lad I would had found this fascinating and much more topical than sitting in a biology classroom on a winter day.
So ignoring the carcasses for now (note the spelling by the way) what do you think would happen to the rest of the man-made debris unless it is removed by man. There is no natural process that would deal with it. At best it might eventually move elsewhere (very unlikely though given the local hydrography) but in the meantime it would accumulate further and remain a hazard to both wildlife and humans alike. I still believe it would be prudent to be careful about how the dead cow is handled but, if lessons are needed in the reality of life and death in the natural world, there are some excellent DVDs available. However, if you need a more 'first hand experience' you could even arrange a visit to your local abattoir.
[quote][p][bold]cj07589[/bold] wrote: Big deal! what an absolute non-story, there are far more important priorities than whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses it's called nature! nature will decompose the carcuss and returning the materials, minerals back to the sea and land. Perhaps Amanda and Sean should have taken this opportunity to explain to their son that life runs its course and death is a very natural part of that cycle. Often is the case where negatives are initially perceived there are actually great opportunities to be had, as a young lad I would had found this fascinating and much more topical than sitting in a biology classroom on a winter day.[/p][/quote]So ignoring the carcasses for now (note the spelling by the way) what do you think would happen to the rest of the man-made debris unless it is removed by man. There is no natural process that would deal with it. At best it might eventually move elsewhere (very unlikely though given the local hydrography) but in the meantime it would accumulate further and remain a hazard to both wildlife and humans alike. I still believe it would be prudent to be careful about how the dead cow is handled but, if lessons are needed in the reality of life and death in the natural world, there are some excellent DVDs available. However, if you need a more 'first hand experience' you could even arrange a visit to your local abattoir. Bob Goulding

4:43pm Tue 14 Jan 14

shy talk says...

At last the Echo has taken on a freelence profreader and spelchecker. Welcome Bob Goulding.
At last the Echo has taken on a freelence profreader and spelchecker. Welcome Bob Goulding. shy talk

5:33pm Tue 14 Jan 14

Bob Goulding says...

shy talk wrote:
At last the Echo has taken on a freelence profreader and spelchecker. Welcome Bob Goulding.
Don't think I'll take the bate.
[quote][p][bold]shy talk[/bold] wrote: At last the Echo has taken on a freelence profreader and spelchecker. Welcome Bob Goulding.[/p][/quote]Don't think I'll take the bate. Bob Goulding

12:16pm Wed 15 Jan 14

cj07589 says...

Bob Goulding wrote:
cj07589 wrote:
Big deal! what an absolute non-story, there are far more important priorities than whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses it's called nature! nature will decompose the carcuss and returning the materials, minerals back to the sea and land.
Perhaps Amanda and Sean should have taken this opportunity to explain to their son that life runs its course and death is a very natural part of that cycle. Often is the case where negatives are initially perceived there are actually great opportunities to be had, as a young lad I would had found this fascinating and much more topical than sitting in a biology classroom on a winter day.
So ignoring the carcasses for now (note the spelling by the way) what do you think would happen to the rest of the man-made debris unless it is removed by man. There is no natural process that would deal with it. At best it might eventually move elsewhere (very unlikely though given the local hydrography) but in the meantime it would accumulate further and remain a hazard to both wildlife and humans alike. I still believe it would be prudent to be careful about how the dead cow is handled but, if lessons are needed in the reality of life and death in the natural world, there are some excellent DVDs available. However, if you need a more 'first hand experience' you could even arrange a visit to your local abattoir.
Bob, 'detritus' by definition refers to non-living particulate organic material which specifically excludes human produced composites. I whole heartily endorse the responsible and safe disposal of all man made rubbish spoiling the environment and ecological habitat. My view is that a beached dead cow is actually a food source for other creatures, organisms including bacteria and represents minimal risks to humans provide it is not interfered with. The best advice is do nothing and leave it well alone and let nature take it's course.
Thank you for your concern over my educational enlightenment but since I've lived and worked extensively on 10,000 HA farm, I am sufficiently familiar with abattoirs and the reality of what goes on within them. On a final note correcting spelling on the internet is a sure sign of someone who has lost the argument or someone with far too much time on their hands.
[quote][p][bold]Bob Goulding[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cj07589[/bold] wrote: Big deal! what an absolute non-story, there are far more important priorities than whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses it's called nature! nature will decompose the carcuss and returning the materials, minerals back to the sea and land. Perhaps Amanda and Sean should have taken this opportunity to explain to their son that life runs its course and death is a very natural part of that cycle. Often is the case where negatives are initially perceived there are actually great opportunities to be had, as a young lad I would had found this fascinating and much more topical than sitting in a biology classroom on a winter day.[/p][/quote]So ignoring the carcasses for now (note the spelling by the way) what do you think would happen to the rest of the man-made debris unless it is removed by man. There is no natural process that would deal with it. At best it might eventually move elsewhere (very unlikely though given the local hydrography) but in the meantime it would accumulate further and remain a hazard to both wildlife and humans alike. I still believe it would be prudent to be careful about how the dead cow is handled but, if lessons are needed in the reality of life and death in the natural world, there are some excellent DVDs available. However, if you need a more 'first hand experience' you could even arrange a visit to your local abattoir.[/p][/quote]Bob, 'detritus' by definition refers to non-living particulate organic material which specifically excludes human produced composites. I whole heartily endorse the responsible and safe disposal of all man made rubbish spoiling the environment and ecological habitat. My view is that a beached dead cow is actually a food source for other creatures, organisms including bacteria and represents minimal risks to humans provide it is not interfered with. The best advice is do nothing and leave it well alone and let nature take it's course. Thank you for your concern over my educational enlightenment but since I've lived and worked extensively on 10,000 HA farm, I am sufficiently familiar with abattoirs and the reality of what goes on within them. On a final note correcting spelling on the internet is a sure sign of someone who has lost the argument or someone with far too much time on their hands. cj07589

1:38pm Wed 15 Jan 14

acop40 says...

shy talk wrote:
“Parents Amanda and Sean Green, of Courtlands, said they have stopped taking their four-year-old son to visit the beach. Amanda said: “I'm an animal lover and it's just upsetting to see. I certainly don't want my son seeing that”

Take him to McDonald’s for a beefburger instead then. Chisel Beach is 18 miles long so plenty of choice of where to go.

Totally agree IslandJim1.
She cant take him to a Mc Donalds for a beefburger because she doesn't want him too see a dead cow.
[quote][p][bold]shy talk[/bold] wrote: “Parents Amanda and Sean Green, of Courtlands, said they have stopped taking their four-year-old son to visit the beach. Amanda said: “I'm an animal lover and it's just upsetting to see. I certainly don't want my son seeing that” Take him to McDonald’s for a beefburger instead then. Chisel Beach is 18 miles long so plenty of choice of where to go. Totally agree IslandJim1.[/p][/quote]She cant take him to a Mc Donalds for a beefburger because she doesn't want him too see a dead cow. acop40

2:27pm Wed 15 Jan 14

Bob Goulding says...

cj07589 wrote:
Bob Goulding wrote:
cj07589 wrote:
Big deal! what an absolute non-story, there are far more important priorities than whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses it's called nature! nature will decompose the carcuss and returning the materials, minerals back to the sea and land.
Perhaps Amanda and Sean should have taken this opportunity to explain to their son that life runs its course and death is a very natural part of that cycle. Often is the case where negatives are initially perceived there are actually great opportunities to be had, as a young lad I would had found this fascinating and much more topical than sitting in a biology classroom on a winter day.
So ignoring the carcasses for now (note the spelling by the way) what do you think would happen to the rest of the man-made debris unless it is removed by man. There is no natural process that would deal with it. At best it might eventually move elsewhere (very unlikely though given the local hydrography) but in the meantime it would accumulate further and remain a hazard to both wildlife and humans alike. I still believe it would be prudent to be careful about how the dead cow is handled but, if lessons are needed in the reality of life and death in the natural world, there are some excellent DVDs available. However, if you need a more 'first hand experience' you could even arrange a visit to your local abattoir.
Bob, 'detritus' by definition refers to non-living particulate organic material which specifically excludes human produced composites. I whole heartily endorse the responsible and safe disposal of all man made rubbish spoiling the environment and ecological habitat. My view is that a beached dead cow is actually a food source for other creatures, organisms including bacteria and represents minimal risks to humans provide it is not interfered with. The best advice is do nothing and leave it well alone and let nature take it's course.
Thank you for your concern over my educational enlightenment but since I've lived and worked extensively on 10,000 HA farm, I am sufficiently familiar with abattoirs and the reality of what goes on within them. On a final note correcting spelling on the internet is a sure sign of someone who has lost the argument or someone with far too much time on their hands.
I am glad you agree with me about the importance of clearing up the man-made debris. Your original post ignored this aspect of the clean-up which is what lead me to challenge your view-point.

As far as I can tell no-one was 'whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses' it was simply reported that rotting animal corpses were included in the flotsam which made the job especially unpleasant and some walkers found unpalatable. It is to their great credit that the volunteers completed the job despite these unsavoury aspects.

I also don't agree that the corpses of large mammals should be left to rot on the beach if they can be removed. We do not know how they perished nor whether their demise involved or has given rise to pathogens that could be harmful to humans and/or other wildlife. If you found a dead cow in a field you would certainly not leave it there to rot.

By the way, my suggestion concerning a visit to a local abbattoire was not directed at you personally. With hindsight I should have referred to 'one' rather than 'you' and I do believe it would help youngsters come to terms with these issues once they are old enough to understand properly.

Finally, how on earth you can conclude that correcting a spelling error is a sign or someone who has lost an argument is beyond me. It was my first post in response to yours so, technically, we hadn't even started arguing at that point. Typing the correct spelling of carcasses took no additional time at all.
[quote][p][bold]cj07589[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bob Goulding[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cj07589[/bold] wrote: Big deal! what an absolute non-story, there are far more important priorities than whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses it's called nature! nature will decompose the carcuss and returning the materials, minerals back to the sea and land. Perhaps Amanda and Sean should have taken this opportunity to explain to their son that life runs its course and death is a very natural part of that cycle. Often is the case where negatives are initially perceived there are actually great opportunities to be had, as a young lad I would had found this fascinating and much more topical than sitting in a biology classroom on a winter day.[/p][/quote]So ignoring the carcasses for now (note the spelling by the way) what do you think would happen to the rest of the man-made debris unless it is removed by man. There is no natural process that would deal with it. At best it might eventually move elsewhere (very unlikely though given the local hydrography) but in the meantime it would accumulate further and remain a hazard to both wildlife and humans alike. I still believe it would be prudent to be careful about how the dead cow is handled but, if lessons are needed in the reality of life and death in the natural world, there are some excellent DVDs available. However, if you need a more 'first hand experience' you could even arrange a visit to your local abattoir.[/p][/quote]Bob, 'detritus' by definition refers to non-living particulate organic material which specifically excludes human produced composites. I whole heartily endorse the responsible and safe disposal of all man made rubbish spoiling the environment and ecological habitat. My view is that a beached dead cow is actually a food source for other creatures, organisms including bacteria and represents minimal risks to humans provide it is not interfered with. The best advice is do nothing and leave it well alone and let nature take it's course. Thank you for your concern over my educational enlightenment but since I've lived and worked extensively on 10,000 HA farm, I am sufficiently familiar with abattoirs and the reality of what goes on within them. On a final note correcting spelling on the internet is a sure sign of someone who has lost the argument or someone with far too much time on their hands.[/p][/quote]I am glad you agree with me about the importance of clearing up the man-made debris. Your original post ignored this aspect of the clean-up which is what lead me to challenge your view-point. As far as I can tell no-one was 'whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses' it was simply reported that rotting animal corpses were included in the flotsam which made the job especially unpleasant and some walkers found unpalatable. It is to their great credit that the volunteers completed the job despite these unsavoury aspects. I also don't agree that the corpses of large mammals should be left to rot on the beach if they can be removed. We do not know how they perished nor whether their demise involved or has given rise to pathogens that could be harmful to humans and/or other wildlife. If you found a dead cow in a field you would certainly not leave it there to rot. By the way, my suggestion concerning a visit to a local abbattoire was not directed at you personally. With hindsight I should have referred to 'one' rather than 'you' and I do believe it would help youngsters come to terms with these issues once they are old enough to understand properly. Finally, how on earth you can conclude that correcting a spelling error is a sign or someone who has lost an argument is beyond me. It was my first post in response to yours so, technically, we hadn't even started arguing at that point. Typing the correct spelling of carcasses took no additional time at all. Bob Goulding

3:38pm Wed 15 Jan 14

cj07589 says...

Bob Goulding wrote:
cj07589 wrote:
Bob Goulding wrote:
cj07589 wrote:
Big deal! what an absolute non-story, there are far more important priorities than whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses it's called nature! nature will decompose the carcuss and returning the materials, minerals back to the sea and land.
Perhaps Amanda and Sean should have taken this opportunity to explain to their son that life runs its course and death is a very natural part of that cycle. Often is the case where negatives are initially perceived there are actually great opportunities to be had, as a young lad I would had found this fascinating and much more topical than sitting in a biology classroom on a winter day.
So ignoring the carcasses for now (note the spelling by the way) what do you think would happen to the rest of the man-made debris unless it is removed by man. There is no natural process that would deal with it. At best it might eventually move elsewhere (very unlikely though given the local hydrography) but in the meantime it would accumulate further and remain a hazard to both wildlife and humans alike. I still believe it would be prudent to be careful about how the dead cow is handled but, if lessons are needed in the reality of life and death in the natural world, there are some excellent DVDs available. However, if you need a more 'first hand experience' you could even arrange a visit to your local abattoir.
Bob, 'detritus' by definition refers to non-living particulate organic material which specifically excludes human produced composites. I whole heartily endorse the responsible and safe disposal of all man made rubbish spoiling the environment and ecological habitat. My view is that a beached dead cow is actually a food source for other creatures, organisms including bacteria and represents minimal risks to humans provide it is not interfered with. The best advice is do nothing and leave it well alone and let nature take it's course.
Thank you for your concern over my educational enlightenment but since I've lived and worked extensively on 10,000 HA farm, I am sufficiently familiar with abattoirs and the reality of what goes on within them. On a final note correcting spelling on the internet is a sure sign of someone who has lost the argument or someone with far too much time on their hands.
I am glad you agree with me about the importance of clearing up the man-made debris. Your original post ignored this aspect of the clean-up which is what lead me to challenge your view-point.

As far as I can tell no-one was 'whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses' it was simply reported that rotting animal corpses were included in the flotsam which made the job especially unpleasant and some walkers found unpalatable. It is to their great credit that the volunteers completed the job despite these unsavoury aspects.

I also don't agree that the corpses of large mammals should be left to rot on the beach if they can be removed. We do not know how they perished nor whether their demise involved or has given rise to pathogens that could be harmful to humans and/or other wildlife. If you found a dead cow in a field you would certainly not leave it there to rot.

By the way, my suggestion concerning a visit to a local abbattoire was not directed at you personally. With hindsight I should have referred to 'one' rather than 'you' and I do believe it would help youngsters come to terms with these issues once they are old enough to understand properly.

Finally, how on earth you can conclude that correcting a spelling error is a sign or someone who has lost an argument is beyond me. It was my first post in response to yours so, technically, we hadn't even started arguing at that point. Typing the correct spelling of carcasses took no additional time at all.
Ref. Spelling error, I have no issue in admitting that I'm not perfect by any means, not helped by the ipad predictive text which is generally a useful aid which can also hinder as demonstrated in this instance. I profess that I'm not the best at English since it is my second language to Cantonese and have never professed ever to be a scholar in it's application, nor do I wish to be!. However from a basic communication interaction perspective if someone's retort/opening sentence is crictism it is unlikely to be well received, nor is it conducive to the debate. We could sit here all day picking up spelling and grammar mistakes but the pertinent points made were understood, hence why I think purposely putting someone down for self gratification firstly sets a poor example, is unhelpful, is negative and is perceived by many as petty and pedantic especially in this age of modern communication.
[quote][p][bold]Bob Goulding[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cj07589[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bob Goulding[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cj07589[/bold] wrote: Big deal! what an absolute non-story, there are far more important priorities than whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses it's called nature! nature will decompose the carcuss and returning the materials, minerals back to the sea and land. Perhaps Amanda and Sean should have taken this opportunity to explain to their son that life runs its course and death is a very natural part of that cycle. Often is the case where negatives are initially perceived there are actually great opportunities to be had, as a young lad I would had found this fascinating and much more topical than sitting in a biology classroom on a winter day.[/p][/quote]So ignoring the carcasses for now (note the spelling by the way) what do you think would happen to the rest of the man-made debris unless it is removed by man. There is no natural process that would deal with it. At best it might eventually move elsewhere (very unlikely though given the local hydrography) but in the meantime it would accumulate further and remain a hazard to both wildlife and humans alike. I still believe it would be prudent to be careful about how the dead cow is handled but, if lessons are needed in the reality of life and death in the natural world, there are some excellent DVDs available. However, if you need a more 'first hand experience' you could even arrange a visit to your local abattoir.[/p][/quote]Bob, 'detritus' by definition refers to non-living particulate organic material which specifically excludes human produced composites. I whole heartily endorse the responsible and safe disposal of all man made rubbish spoiling the environment and ecological habitat. My view is that a beached dead cow is actually a food source for other creatures, organisms including bacteria and represents minimal risks to humans provide it is not interfered with. The best advice is do nothing and leave it well alone and let nature take it's course. Thank you for your concern over my educational enlightenment but since I've lived and worked extensively on 10,000 HA farm, I am sufficiently familiar with abattoirs and the reality of what goes on within them. On a final note correcting spelling on the internet is a sure sign of someone who has lost the argument or someone with far too much time on their hands.[/p][/quote]I am glad you agree with me about the importance of clearing up the man-made debris. Your original post ignored this aspect of the clean-up which is what lead me to challenge your view-point. As far as I can tell no-one was 'whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses' it was simply reported that rotting animal corpses were included in the flotsam which made the job especially unpleasant and some walkers found unpalatable. It is to their great credit that the volunteers completed the job despite these unsavoury aspects. I also don't agree that the corpses of large mammals should be left to rot on the beach if they can be removed. We do not know how they perished nor whether their demise involved or has given rise to pathogens that could be harmful to humans and/or other wildlife. If you found a dead cow in a field you would certainly not leave it there to rot. By the way, my suggestion concerning a visit to a local abbattoire was not directed at you personally. With hindsight I should have referred to 'one' rather than 'you' and I do believe it would help youngsters come to terms with these issues once they are old enough to understand properly. Finally, how on earth you can conclude that correcting a spelling error is a sign or someone who has lost an argument is beyond me. It was my first post in response to yours so, technically, we hadn't even started arguing at that point. Typing the correct spelling of carcasses took no additional time at all.[/p][/quote]Ref. Spelling error, I have no issue in admitting that I'm not perfect by any means, not helped by the ipad predictive text which is generally a useful aid which can also hinder as demonstrated in this instance. I profess that I'm not the best at English since it is my second language to Cantonese and have never professed ever to be a scholar in it's application, nor do I wish to be!. However from a basic communication interaction perspective if someone's retort/opening sentence is crictism it is unlikely to be well received, nor is it conducive to the debate. We could sit here all day picking up spelling and grammar mistakes but the pertinent points made were understood, hence why I think purposely putting someone down for self gratification firstly sets a poor example, is unhelpful, is negative and is perceived by many as petty and pedantic especially in this age of modern communication. cj07589

3:53pm Wed 15 Jan 14

Bob Goulding says...

cj07589 wrote:
Bob Goulding wrote:
cj07589 wrote:
Bob Goulding wrote:
cj07589 wrote:
Big deal! what an absolute non-story, there are far more important priorities than whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses it's called nature! nature will decompose the carcuss and returning the materials, minerals back to the sea and land.
Perhaps Amanda and Sean should have taken this opportunity to explain to their son that life runs its course and death is a very natural part of that cycle. Often is the case where negatives are initially perceived there are actually great opportunities to be had, as a young lad I would had found this fascinating and much more topical than sitting in a biology classroom on a winter day.
So ignoring the carcasses for now (note the spelling by the way) what do you think would happen to the rest of the man-made debris unless it is removed by man. There is no natural process that would deal with it. At best it might eventually move elsewhere (very unlikely though given the local hydrography) but in the meantime it would accumulate further and remain a hazard to both wildlife and humans alike. I still believe it would be prudent to be careful about how the dead cow is handled but, if lessons are needed in the reality of life and death in the natural world, there are some excellent DVDs available. However, if you need a more 'first hand experience' you could even arrange a visit to your local abattoir.
Bob, 'detritus' by definition refers to non-living particulate organic material which specifically excludes human produced composites. I whole heartily endorse the responsible and safe disposal of all man made rubbish spoiling the environment and ecological habitat. My view is that a beached dead cow is actually a food source for other creatures, organisms including bacteria and represents minimal risks to humans provide it is not interfered with. The best advice is do nothing and leave it well alone and let nature take it's course.
Thank you for your concern over my educational enlightenment but since I've lived and worked extensively on 10,000 HA farm, I am sufficiently familiar with abattoirs and the reality of what goes on within them. On a final note correcting spelling on the internet is a sure sign of someone who has lost the argument or someone with far too much time on their hands.
I am glad you agree with me about the importance of clearing up the man-made debris. Your original post ignored this aspect of the clean-up which is what lead me to challenge your view-point.

As far as I can tell no-one was 'whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses' it was simply reported that rotting animal corpses were included in the flotsam which made the job especially unpleasant and some walkers found unpalatable. It is to their great credit that the volunteers completed the job despite these unsavoury aspects.

I also don't agree that the corpses of large mammals should be left to rot on the beach if they can be removed. We do not know how they perished nor whether their demise involved or has given rise to pathogens that could be harmful to humans and/or other wildlife. If you found a dead cow in a field you would certainly not leave it there to rot.

By the way, my suggestion concerning a visit to a local abbattoire was not directed at you personally. With hindsight I should have referred to 'one' rather than 'you' and I do believe it would help youngsters come to terms with these issues once they are old enough to understand properly.

Finally, how on earth you can conclude that correcting a spelling error is a sign or someone who has lost an argument is beyond me. It was my first post in response to yours so, technically, we hadn't even started arguing at that point. Typing the correct spelling of carcasses took no additional time at all.
Ref. Spelling error, I have no issue in admitting that I'm not perfect by any means, not helped by the ipad predictive text which is generally a useful aid which can also hinder as demonstrated in this instance. I profess that I'm not the best at English since it is my second language to Cantonese and have never professed ever to be a scholar in it's application, nor do I wish to be!. However from a basic communication interaction perspective if someone's retort/opening sentence is crictism it is unlikely to be well received, nor is it conducive to the debate. We could sit here all day picking up spelling and grammar mistakes but the pertinent points made were understood, hence why I think purposely putting someone down for self gratification firstly sets a poor example, is unhelpful, is negative and is perceived by many as petty and pedantic especially in this age of modern communication.
How sad. Clearly you have more time on your hands than I.

What about the real issues. Rotting corpses in public places represent a potential health hazard. Period.
[quote][p][bold]cj07589[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bob Goulding[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cj07589[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bob Goulding[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cj07589[/bold] wrote: Big deal! what an absolute non-story, there are far more important priorities than whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses it's called nature! nature will decompose the carcuss and returning the materials, minerals back to the sea and land. Perhaps Amanda and Sean should have taken this opportunity to explain to their son that life runs its course and death is a very natural part of that cycle. Often is the case where negatives are initially perceived there are actually great opportunities to be had, as a young lad I would had found this fascinating and much more topical than sitting in a biology classroom on a winter day.[/p][/quote]So ignoring the carcasses for now (note the spelling by the way) what do you think would happen to the rest of the man-made debris unless it is removed by man. There is no natural process that would deal with it. At best it might eventually move elsewhere (very unlikely though given the local hydrography) but in the meantime it would accumulate further and remain a hazard to both wildlife and humans alike. I still believe it would be prudent to be careful about how the dead cow is handled but, if lessons are needed in the reality of life and death in the natural world, there are some excellent DVDs available. However, if you need a more 'first hand experience' you could even arrange a visit to your local abattoir.[/p][/quote]Bob, 'detritus' by definition refers to non-living particulate organic material which specifically excludes human produced composites. I whole heartily endorse the responsible and safe disposal of all man made rubbish spoiling the environment and ecological habitat. My view is that a beached dead cow is actually a food source for other creatures, organisms including bacteria and represents minimal risks to humans provide it is not interfered with. The best advice is do nothing and leave it well alone and let nature take it's course. Thank you for your concern over my educational enlightenment but since I've lived and worked extensively on 10,000 HA farm, I am sufficiently familiar with abattoirs and the reality of what goes on within them. On a final note correcting spelling on the internet is a sure sign of someone who has lost the argument or someone with far too much time on their hands.[/p][/quote]I am glad you agree with me about the importance of clearing up the man-made debris. Your original post ignored this aspect of the clean-up which is what lead me to challenge your view-point. As far as I can tell no-one was 'whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses' it was simply reported that rotting animal corpses were included in the flotsam which made the job especially unpleasant and some walkers found unpalatable. It is to their great credit that the volunteers completed the job despite these unsavoury aspects. I also don't agree that the corpses of large mammals should be left to rot on the beach if they can be removed. We do not know how they perished nor whether their demise involved or has given rise to pathogens that could be harmful to humans and/or other wildlife. If you found a dead cow in a field you would certainly not leave it there to rot. By the way, my suggestion concerning a visit to a local abbattoire was not directed at you personally. With hindsight I should have referred to 'one' rather than 'you' and I do believe it would help youngsters come to terms with these issues once they are old enough to understand properly. Finally, how on earth you can conclude that correcting a spelling error is a sign or someone who has lost an argument is beyond me. It was my first post in response to yours so, technically, we hadn't even started arguing at that point. Typing the correct spelling of carcasses took no additional time at all.[/p][/quote]Ref. Spelling error, I have no issue in admitting that I'm not perfect by any means, not helped by the ipad predictive text which is generally a useful aid which can also hinder as demonstrated in this instance. I profess that I'm not the best at English since it is my second language to Cantonese and have never professed ever to be a scholar in it's application, nor do I wish to be!. However from a basic communication interaction perspective if someone's retort/opening sentence is crictism it is unlikely to be well received, nor is it conducive to the debate. We could sit here all day picking up spelling and grammar mistakes but the pertinent points made were understood, hence why I think purposely putting someone down for self gratification firstly sets a poor example, is unhelpful, is negative and is perceived by many as petty and pedantic especially in this age of modern communication.[/p][/quote]How sad. Clearly you have more time on your hands than I. What about the real issues. Rotting corpses in public places represent a potential health hazard. Period. Bob Goulding

4:09pm Wed 15 Jan 14

cj07589 says...

Bob Goulding wrote:
cj07589 wrote:
Bob Goulding wrote:
cj07589 wrote:
Bob Goulding wrote:
cj07589 wrote:
Big deal! what an absolute non-story, there are far more important priorities than whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses it's called nature! nature will decompose the carcuss and returning the materials, minerals back to the sea and land.
Perhaps Amanda and Sean should have taken this opportunity to explain to their son that life runs its course and death is a very natural part of that cycle. Often is the case where negatives are initially perceived there are actually great opportunities to be had, as a young lad I would had found this fascinating and much more topical than sitting in a biology classroom on a winter day.
So ignoring the carcasses for now (note the spelling by the way) what do you think would happen to the rest of the man-made debris unless it is removed by man. There is no natural process that would deal with it. At best it might eventually move elsewhere (very unlikely though given the local hydrography) but in the meantime it would accumulate further and remain a hazard to both wildlife and humans alike. I still believe it would be prudent to be careful about how the dead cow is handled but, if lessons are needed in the reality of life and death in the natural world, there are some excellent DVDs available. However, if you need a more 'first hand experience' you could even arrange a visit to your local abattoir.
Bob, 'detritus' by definition refers to non-living particulate organic material which specifically excludes human produced composites. I whole heartily endorse the responsible and safe disposal of all man made rubbish spoiling the environment and ecological habitat. My view is that a beached dead cow is actually a food source for other creatures, organisms including bacteria and represents minimal risks to humans provide it is not interfered with. The best advice is do nothing and leave it well alone and let nature take it's course.
Thank you for your concern over my educational enlightenment but since I've lived and worked extensively on 10,000 HA farm, I am sufficiently familiar with abattoirs and the reality of what goes on within them. On a final note correcting spelling on the internet is a sure sign of someone who has lost the argument or someone with far too much time on their hands.
I am glad you agree with me about the importance of clearing up the man-made debris. Your original post ignored this aspect of the clean-up which is what lead me to challenge your view-point.

As far as I can tell no-one was 'whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses' it was simply reported that rotting animal corpses were included in the flotsam which made the job especially unpleasant and some walkers found unpalatable. It is to their great credit that the volunteers completed the job despite these unsavoury aspects.

I also don't agree that the corpses of large mammals should be left to rot on the beach if they can be removed. We do not know how they perished nor whether their demise involved or has given rise to pathogens that could be harmful to humans and/or other wildlife. If you found a dead cow in a field you would certainly not leave it there to rot.

By the way, my suggestion concerning a visit to a local abbattoire was not directed at you personally. With hindsight I should have referred to 'one' rather than 'you' and I do believe it would help youngsters come to terms with these issues once they are old enough to understand properly.

Finally, how on earth you can conclude that correcting a spelling error is a sign or someone who has lost an argument is beyond me. It was my first post in response to yours so, technically, we hadn't even started arguing at that point. Typing the correct spelling of carcasses took no additional time at all.
Ref. Spelling error, I have no issue in admitting that I'm not perfect by any means, not helped by the ipad predictive text which is generally a useful aid which can also hinder as demonstrated in this instance. I profess that I'm not the best at English since it is my second language to Cantonese and have never professed ever to be a scholar in it's application, nor do I wish to be!. However from a basic communication interaction perspective if someone's retort/opening sentence is crictism it is unlikely to be well received, nor is it conducive to the debate. We could sit here all day picking up spelling and grammar mistakes but the pertinent points made were understood, hence why I think purposely putting someone down for self gratification firstly sets a poor example, is unhelpful, is negative and is perceived by many as petty and pedantic especially in this age of modern communication.
How sad. Clearly you have more time on your hands than I.

What about the real issues. Rotting corpses in public places represent a potential health hazard. Period.
Nope your wrong again......I'm actually in HK on business writing off the jetlag by pointing out your complete lack of any emotional intellect and inability to communicate normally and reasonably.
Please don't let me hold you back by wasting your busy body life worrying about complete non-issues, if your so bloody minded and concerned about the problem why don't you pull your finger out get off your lazy backside and sort it out yourself for the good of the community rather than expecting others to do it for you!
[quote][p][bold]Bob Goulding[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cj07589[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bob Goulding[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cj07589[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bob Goulding[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cj07589[/bold] wrote: Big deal! what an absolute non-story, there are far more important priorities than whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses it's called nature! nature will decompose the carcuss and returning the materials, minerals back to the sea and land. Perhaps Amanda and Sean should have taken this opportunity to explain to their son that life runs its course and death is a very natural part of that cycle. Often is the case where negatives are initially perceived there are actually great opportunities to be had, as a young lad I would had found this fascinating and much more topical than sitting in a biology classroom on a winter day.[/p][/quote]So ignoring the carcasses for now (note the spelling by the way) what do you think would happen to the rest of the man-made debris unless it is removed by man. There is no natural process that would deal with it. At best it might eventually move elsewhere (very unlikely though given the local hydrography) but in the meantime it would accumulate further and remain a hazard to both wildlife and humans alike. I still believe it would be prudent to be careful about how the dead cow is handled but, if lessons are needed in the reality of life and death in the natural world, there are some excellent DVDs available. However, if you need a more 'first hand experience' you could even arrange a visit to your local abattoir.[/p][/quote]Bob, 'detritus' by definition refers to non-living particulate organic material which specifically excludes human produced composites. I whole heartily endorse the responsible and safe disposal of all man made rubbish spoiling the environment and ecological habitat. My view is that a beached dead cow is actually a food source for other creatures, organisms including bacteria and represents minimal risks to humans provide it is not interfered with. The best advice is do nothing and leave it well alone and let nature take it's course. Thank you for your concern over my educational enlightenment but since I've lived and worked extensively on 10,000 HA farm, I am sufficiently familiar with abattoirs and the reality of what goes on within them. On a final note correcting spelling on the internet is a sure sign of someone who has lost the argument or someone with far too much time on their hands.[/p][/quote]I am glad you agree with me about the importance of clearing up the man-made debris. Your original post ignored this aspect of the clean-up which is what lead me to challenge your view-point. As far as I can tell no-one was 'whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses' it was simply reported that rotting animal corpses were included in the flotsam which made the job especially unpleasant and some walkers found unpalatable. It is to their great credit that the volunteers completed the job despite these unsavoury aspects. I also don't agree that the corpses of large mammals should be left to rot on the beach if they can be removed. We do not know how they perished nor whether their demise involved or has given rise to pathogens that could be harmful to humans and/or other wildlife. If you found a dead cow in a field you would certainly not leave it there to rot. By the way, my suggestion concerning a visit to a local abbattoire was not directed at you personally. With hindsight I should have referred to 'one' rather than 'you' and I do believe it would help youngsters come to terms with these issues once they are old enough to understand properly. Finally, how on earth you can conclude that correcting a spelling error is a sign or someone who has lost an argument is beyond me. It was my first post in response to yours so, technically, we hadn't even started arguing at that point. Typing the correct spelling of carcasses took no additional time at all.[/p][/quote]Ref. Spelling error, I have no issue in admitting that I'm not perfect by any means, not helped by the ipad predictive text which is generally a useful aid which can also hinder as demonstrated in this instance. I profess that I'm not the best at English since it is my second language to Cantonese and have never professed ever to be a scholar in it's application, nor do I wish to be!. However from a basic communication interaction perspective if someone's retort/opening sentence is crictism it is unlikely to be well received, nor is it conducive to the debate. We could sit here all day picking up spelling and grammar mistakes but the pertinent points made were understood, hence why I think purposely putting someone down for self gratification firstly sets a poor example, is unhelpful, is negative and is perceived by many as petty and pedantic especially in this age of modern communication.[/p][/quote]How sad. Clearly you have more time on your hands than I. What about the real issues. Rotting corpses in public places represent a potential health hazard. Period.[/p][/quote]Nope your wrong again......I'm actually in HK on business writing off the jetlag by pointing out your complete lack of any emotional intellect and inability to communicate normally and reasonably. Please don't let me hold you back by wasting your busy body life worrying about complete non-issues, if your so bloody minded and concerned about the problem why don't you pull your finger out get off your lazy backside and sort it out yourself for the good of the community rather than expecting others to do it for you! cj07589

4:23pm Wed 15 Jan 14

Bob Goulding says...

cj07589 wrote:
Bob Goulding wrote:
cj07589 wrote:
Bob Goulding wrote:
cj07589 wrote:
Bob Goulding wrote:
cj07589 wrote:
Big deal! what an absolute non-story, there are far more important priorities than whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses it's called nature! nature will decompose the carcuss and returning the materials, minerals back to the sea and land.
Perhaps Amanda and Sean should have taken this opportunity to explain to their son that life runs its course and death is a very natural part of that cycle. Often is the case where negatives are initially perceived there are actually great opportunities to be had, as a young lad I would had found this fascinating and much more topical than sitting in a biology classroom on a winter day.
So ignoring the carcasses for now (note the spelling by the way) what do you think would happen to the rest of the man-made debris unless it is removed by man. There is no natural process that would deal with it. At best it might eventually move elsewhere (very unlikely though given the local hydrography) but in the meantime it would accumulate further and remain a hazard to both wildlife and humans alike. I still believe it would be prudent to be careful about how the dead cow is handled but, if lessons are needed in the reality of life and death in the natural world, there are some excellent DVDs available. However, if you need a more 'first hand experience' you could even arrange a visit to your local abattoir.
Bob, 'detritus' by definition refers to non-living particulate organic material which specifically excludes human produced composites. I whole heartily endorse the responsible and safe disposal of all man made rubbish spoiling the environment and ecological habitat. My view is that a beached dead cow is actually a food source for other creatures, organisms including bacteria and represents minimal risks to humans provide it is not interfered with. The best advice is do nothing and leave it well alone and let nature take it's course.
Thank you for your concern over my educational enlightenment but since I've lived and worked extensively on 10,000 HA farm, I am sufficiently familiar with abattoirs and the reality of what goes on within them. On a final note correcting spelling on the internet is a sure sign of someone who has lost the argument or someone with far too much time on their hands.
I am glad you agree with me about the importance of clearing up the man-made debris. Your original post ignored this aspect of the clean-up which is what lead me to challenge your view-point.

As far as I can tell no-one was 'whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses' it was simply reported that rotting animal corpses were included in the flotsam which made the job especially unpleasant and some walkers found unpalatable. It is to their great credit that the volunteers completed the job despite these unsavoury aspects.

I also don't agree that the corpses of large mammals should be left to rot on the beach if they can be removed. We do not know how they perished nor whether their demise involved or has given rise to pathogens that could be harmful to humans and/or other wildlife. If you found a dead cow in a field you would certainly not leave it there to rot.

By the way, my suggestion concerning a visit to a local abbattoire was not directed at you personally. With hindsight I should have referred to 'one' rather than 'you' and I do believe it would help youngsters come to terms with these issues once they are old enough to understand properly.

Finally, how on earth you can conclude that correcting a spelling error is a sign or someone who has lost an argument is beyond me. It was my first post in response to yours so, technically, we hadn't even started arguing at that point. Typing the correct spelling of carcasses took no additional time at all.
Ref. Spelling error, I have no issue in admitting that I'm not perfect by any means, not helped by the ipad predictive text which is generally a useful aid which can also hinder as demonstrated in this instance. I profess that I'm not the best at English since it is my second language to Cantonese and have never professed ever to be a scholar in it's application, nor do I wish to be!. However from a basic communication interaction perspective if someone's retort/opening sentence is crictism it is unlikely to be well received, nor is it conducive to the debate. We could sit here all day picking up spelling and grammar mistakes but the pertinent points made were understood, hence why I think purposely putting someone down for self gratification firstly sets a poor example, is unhelpful, is negative and is perceived by many as petty and pedantic especially in this age of modern communication.
How sad. Clearly you have more time on your hands than I.

What about the real issues. Rotting corpses in public places represent a potential health hazard. Period.
Nope your wrong again......I'm actually in HK on business writing off the jetlag by pointing out your complete lack of any emotional intellect and inability to communicate normally and reasonably.
Please don't let me hold you back by wasting your busy body life worrying about complete non-issues, if your so bloody minded and concerned about the problem why don't you pull your finger out get off your lazy backside and sort it out yourself for the good of the community rather than expecting others to do it for you!
Interesting, albeit a totally inaccurate appraisal. By the way it's you're not your.
[quote][p][bold]cj07589[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bob Goulding[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cj07589[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bob Goulding[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cj07589[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bob Goulding[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cj07589[/bold] wrote: Big deal! what an absolute non-story, there are far more important priorities than whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses it's called nature! nature will decompose the carcuss and returning the materials, minerals back to the sea and land. Perhaps Amanda and Sean should have taken this opportunity to explain to their son that life runs its course and death is a very natural part of that cycle. Often is the case where negatives are initially perceived there are actually great opportunities to be had, as a young lad I would had found this fascinating and much more topical than sitting in a biology classroom on a winter day.[/p][/quote]So ignoring the carcasses for now (note the spelling by the way) what do you think would happen to the rest of the man-made debris unless it is removed by man. There is no natural process that would deal with it. At best it might eventually move elsewhere (very unlikely though given the local hydrography) but in the meantime it would accumulate further and remain a hazard to both wildlife and humans alike. I still believe it would be prudent to be careful about how the dead cow is handled but, if lessons are needed in the reality of life and death in the natural world, there are some excellent DVDs available. However, if you need a more 'first hand experience' you could even arrange a visit to your local abattoir.[/p][/quote]Bob, 'detritus' by definition refers to non-living particulate organic material which specifically excludes human produced composites. I whole heartily endorse the responsible and safe disposal of all man made rubbish spoiling the environment and ecological habitat. My view is that a beached dead cow is actually a food source for other creatures, organisms including bacteria and represents minimal risks to humans provide it is not interfered with. The best advice is do nothing and leave it well alone and let nature take it's course. Thank you for your concern over my educational enlightenment but since I've lived and worked extensively on 10,000 HA farm, I am sufficiently familiar with abattoirs and the reality of what goes on within them. On a final note correcting spelling on the internet is a sure sign of someone who has lost the argument or someone with far too much time on their hands.[/p][/quote]I am glad you agree with me about the importance of clearing up the man-made debris. Your original post ignored this aspect of the clean-up which is what lead me to challenge your view-point. As far as I can tell no-one was 'whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses' it was simply reported that rotting animal corpses were included in the flotsam which made the job especially unpleasant and some walkers found unpalatable. It is to their great credit that the volunteers completed the job despite these unsavoury aspects. I also don't agree that the corpses of large mammals should be left to rot on the beach if they can be removed. We do not know how they perished nor whether their demise involved or has given rise to pathogens that could be harmful to humans and/or other wildlife. If you found a dead cow in a field you would certainly not leave it there to rot. By the way, my suggestion concerning a visit to a local abbattoire was not directed at you personally. With hindsight I should have referred to 'one' rather than 'you' and I do believe it would help youngsters come to terms with these issues once they are old enough to understand properly. Finally, how on earth you can conclude that correcting a spelling error is a sign or someone who has lost an argument is beyond me. It was my first post in response to yours so, technically, we hadn't even started arguing at that point. Typing the correct spelling of carcasses took no additional time at all.[/p][/quote]Ref. Spelling error, I have no issue in admitting that I'm not perfect by any means, not helped by the ipad predictive text which is generally a useful aid which can also hinder as demonstrated in this instance. I profess that I'm not the best at English since it is my second language to Cantonese and have never professed ever to be a scholar in it's application, nor do I wish to be!. However from a basic communication interaction perspective if someone's retort/opening sentence is crictism it is unlikely to be well received, nor is it conducive to the debate. We could sit here all day picking up spelling and grammar mistakes but the pertinent points made were understood, hence why I think purposely putting someone down for self gratification firstly sets a poor example, is unhelpful, is negative and is perceived by many as petty and pedantic especially in this age of modern communication.[/p][/quote]How sad. Clearly you have more time on your hands than I. What about the real issues. Rotting corpses in public places represent a potential health hazard. Period.[/p][/quote]Nope your wrong again......I'm actually in HK on business writing off the jetlag by pointing out your complete lack of any emotional intellect and inability to communicate normally and reasonably. Please don't let me hold you back by wasting your busy body life worrying about complete non-issues, if your so bloody minded and concerned about the problem why don't you pull your finger out get off your lazy backside and sort it out yourself for the good of the community rather than expecting others to do it for you![/p][/quote]Interesting, albeit a totally inaccurate appraisal. By the way it's you're not your. Bob Goulding

4:30pm Wed 15 Jan 14

cj07589 says...

Bob Goulding wrote:
cj07589 wrote:
Bob Goulding wrote:
cj07589 wrote:
Bob Goulding wrote:
cj07589 wrote:
Bob Goulding wrote:
cj07589 wrote:
Big deal! what an absolute non-story, there are far more important priorities than whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses it's called nature! nature will decompose the carcuss and returning the materials, minerals back to the sea and land.
Perhaps Amanda and Sean should have taken this opportunity to explain to their son that life runs its course and death is a very natural part of that cycle. Often is the case where negatives are initially perceived there are actually great opportunities to be had, as a young lad I would had found this fascinating and much more topical than sitting in a biology classroom on a winter day.
So ignoring the carcasses for now (note the spelling by the way) what do you think would happen to the rest of the man-made debris unless it is removed by man. There is no natural process that would deal with it. At best it might eventually move elsewhere (very unlikely though given the local hydrography) but in the meantime it would accumulate further and remain a hazard to both wildlife and humans alike. I still believe it would be prudent to be careful about how the dead cow is handled but, if lessons are needed in the reality of life and death in the natural world, there are some excellent DVDs available. However, if you need a more 'first hand experience' you could even arrange a visit to your local abattoir.
Bob, 'detritus' by definition refers to non-living particulate organic material which specifically excludes human produced composites. I whole heartily endorse the responsible and safe disposal of all man made rubbish spoiling the environment and ecological habitat. My view is that a beached dead cow is actually a food source for other creatures, organisms including bacteria and represents minimal risks to humans provide it is not interfered with. The best advice is do nothing and leave it well alone and let nature take it's course.
Thank you for your concern over my educational enlightenment but since I've lived and worked extensively on 10,000 HA farm, I am sufficiently familiar with abattoirs and the reality of what goes on within them. On a final note correcting spelling on the internet is a sure sign of someone who has lost the argument or someone with far too much time on their hands.
I am glad you agree with me about the importance of clearing up the man-made debris. Your original post ignored this aspect of the clean-up which is what lead me to challenge your view-point.

As far as I can tell no-one was 'whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses' it was simply reported that rotting animal corpses were included in the flotsam which made the job especially unpleasant and some walkers found unpalatable. It is to their great credit that the volunteers completed the job despite these unsavoury aspects.

I also don't agree that the corpses of large mammals should be left to rot on the beach if they can be removed. We do not know how they perished nor whether their demise involved or has given rise to pathogens that could be harmful to humans and/or other wildlife. If you found a dead cow in a field you would certainly not leave it there to rot.

By the way, my suggestion concerning a visit to a local abbattoire was not directed at you personally. With hindsight I should have referred to 'one' rather than 'you' and I do believe it would help youngsters come to terms with these issues once they are old enough to understand properly.

Finally, how on earth you can conclude that correcting a spelling error is a sign or someone who has lost an argument is beyond me. It was my first post in response to yours so, technically, we hadn't even started arguing at that point. Typing the correct spelling of carcasses took no additional time at all.
Ref. Spelling error, I have no issue in admitting that I'm not perfect by any means, not helped by the ipad predictive text which is generally a useful aid which can also hinder as demonstrated in this instance. I profess that I'm not the best at English since it is my second language to Cantonese and have never professed ever to be a scholar in it's application, nor do I wish to be!. However from a basic communication interaction perspective if someone's retort/opening sentence is crictism it is unlikely to be well received, nor is it conducive to the debate. We could sit here all day picking up spelling and grammar mistakes but the pertinent points made were understood, hence why I think purposely putting someone down for self gratification firstly sets a poor example, is unhelpful, is negative and is perceived by many as petty and pedantic especially in this age of modern communication.
How sad. Clearly you have more time on your hands than I.

What about the real issues. Rotting corpses in public places represent a potential health hazard. Period.
Nope your wrong again......I'm actually in HK on business writing off the jetlag by pointing out your complete lack of any emotional intellect and inability to communicate normally and reasonably.
Please don't let me hold you back by wasting your busy body life worrying about complete non-issues, if your so bloody minded and concerned about the problem why don't you pull your finger out get off your lazy backside and sort it out yourself for the good of the community rather than expecting others to do it for you!
Interesting, albeit a totally inaccurate appraisal. By the way it's you're not your.
And you're all talk, no action nor substance. Or would you prefer to converse in Cantonese since your not making much sense using English! Haven't you got a beach to go clean?
[quote][p][bold]Bob Goulding[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cj07589[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bob Goulding[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cj07589[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bob Goulding[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cj07589[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bob Goulding[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cj07589[/bold] wrote: Big deal! what an absolute non-story, there are far more important priorities than whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses it's called nature! nature will decompose the carcuss and returning the materials, minerals back to the sea and land. Perhaps Amanda and Sean should have taken this opportunity to explain to their son that life runs its course and death is a very natural part of that cycle. Often is the case where negatives are initially perceived there are actually great opportunities to be had, as a young lad I would had found this fascinating and much more topical than sitting in a biology classroom on a winter day.[/p][/quote]So ignoring the carcasses for now (note the spelling by the way) what do you think would happen to the rest of the man-made debris unless it is removed by man. There is no natural process that would deal with it. At best it might eventually move elsewhere (very unlikely though given the local hydrography) but in the meantime it would accumulate further and remain a hazard to both wildlife and humans alike. I still believe it would be prudent to be careful about how the dead cow is handled but, if lessons are needed in the reality of life and death in the natural world, there are some excellent DVDs available. However, if you need a more 'first hand experience' you could even arrange a visit to your local abattoir.[/p][/quote]Bob, 'detritus' by definition refers to non-living particulate organic material which specifically excludes human produced composites. I whole heartily endorse the responsible and safe disposal of all man made rubbish spoiling the environment and ecological habitat. My view is that a beached dead cow is actually a food source for other creatures, organisms including bacteria and represents minimal risks to humans provide it is not interfered with. The best advice is do nothing and leave it well alone and let nature take it's course. Thank you for your concern over my educational enlightenment but since I've lived and worked extensively on 10,000 HA farm, I am sufficiently familiar with abattoirs and the reality of what goes on within them. On a final note correcting spelling on the internet is a sure sign of someone who has lost the argument or someone with far too much time on their hands.[/p][/quote]I am glad you agree with me about the importance of clearing up the man-made debris. Your original post ignored this aspect of the clean-up which is what lead me to challenge your view-point. As far as I can tell no-one was 'whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses' it was simply reported that rotting animal corpses were included in the flotsam which made the job especially unpleasant and some walkers found unpalatable. It is to their great credit that the volunteers completed the job despite these unsavoury aspects. I also don't agree that the corpses of large mammals should be left to rot on the beach if they can be removed. We do not know how they perished nor whether their demise involved or has given rise to pathogens that could be harmful to humans and/or other wildlife. If you found a dead cow in a field you would certainly not leave it there to rot. By the way, my suggestion concerning a visit to a local abbattoire was not directed at you personally. With hindsight I should have referred to 'one' rather than 'you' and I do believe it would help youngsters come to terms with these issues once they are old enough to understand properly. Finally, how on earth you can conclude that correcting a spelling error is a sign or someone who has lost an argument is beyond me. It was my first post in response to yours so, technically, we hadn't even started arguing at that point. Typing the correct spelling of carcasses took no additional time at all.[/p][/quote]Ref. Spelling error, I have no issue in admitting that I'm not perfect by any means, not helped by the ipad predictive text which is generally a useful aid which can also hinder as demonstrated in this instance. I profess that I'm not the best at English since it is my second language to Cantonese and have never professed ever to be a scholar in it's application, nor do I wish to be!. However from a basic communication interaction perspective if someone's retort/opening sentence is crictism it is unlikely to be well received, nor is it conducive to the debate. We could sit here all day picking up spelling and grammar mistakes but the pertinent points made were understood, hence why I think purposely putting someone down for self gratification firstly sets a poor example, is unhelpful, is negative and is perceived by many as petty and pedantic especially in this age of modern communication.[/p][/quote]How sad. Clearly you have more time on your hands than I. What about the real issues. Rotting corpses in public places represent a potential health hazard. Period.[/p][/quote]Nope your wrong again......I'm actually in HK on business writing off the jetlag by pointing out your complete lack of any emotional intellect and inability to communicate normally and reasonably. Please don't let me hold you back by wasting your busy body life worrying about complete non-issues, if your so bloody minded and concerned about the problem why don't you pull your finger out get off your lazy backside and sort it out yourself for the good of the community rather than expecting others to do it for you![/p][/quote]Interesting, albeit a totally inaccurate appraisal. By the way it's you're not your.[/p][/quote]And you're all talk, no action nor substance. Or would you prefer to converse in Cantonese since your not making much sense using English! Haven't you got a beach to go clean? cj07589

5:35pm Wed 15 Jan 14

Bob Goulding says...

cj07589 wrote:
Bob Goulding wrote:
cj07589 wrote:
Bob Goulding wrote:
cj07589 wrote:
Bob Goulding wrote:
cj07589 wrote:
Bob Goulding wrote:
cj07589 wrote:
Big deal! what an absolute non-story, there are far more important priorities than whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses it's called nature! nature will decompose the carcuss and returning the materials, minerals back to the sea and land.
Perhaps Amanda and Sean should have taken this opportunity to explain to their son that life runs its course and death is a very natural part of that cycle. Often is the case where negatives are initially perceived there are actually great opportunities to be had, as a young lad I would had found this fascinating and much more topical than sitting in a biology classroom on a winter day.
So ignoring the carcasses for now (note the spelling by the way) what do you think would happen to the rest of the man-made debris unless it is removed by man. There is no natural process that would deal with it. At best it might eventually move elsewhere (very unlikely though given the local hydrography) but in the meantime it would accumulate further and remain a hazard to both wildlife and humans alike. I still believe it would be prudent to be careful about how the dead cow is handled but, if lessons are needed in the reality of life and death in the natural world, there are some excellent DVDs available. However, if you need a more 'first hand experience' you could even arrange a visit to your local abattoir.
Bob, 'detritus' by definition refers to non-living particulate organic material which specifically excludes human produced composites. I whole heartily endorse the responsible and safe disposal of all man made rubbish spoiling the environment and ecological habitat. My view is that a beached dead cow is actually a food source for other creatures, organisms including bacteria and represents minimal risks to humans provide it is not interfered with. The best advice is do nothing and leave it well alone and let nature take it's course.
Thank you for your concern over my educational enlightenment but since I've lived and worked extensively on 10,000 HA farm, I am sufficiently familiar with abattoirs and the reality of what goes on within them. On a final note correcting spelling on the internet is a sure sign of someone who has lost the argument or someone with far too much time on their hands.
I am glad you agree with me about the importance of clearing up the man-made debris. Your original post ignored this aspect of the clean-up which is what lead me to challenge your view-point.

As far as I can tell no-one was 'whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses' it was simply reported that rotting animal corpses were included in the flotsam which made the job especially unpleasant and some walkers found unpalatable. It is to their great credit that the volunteers completed the job despite these unsavoury aspects.

I also don't agree that the corpses of large mammals should be left to rot on the beach if they can be removed. We do not know how they perished nor whether their demise involved or has given rise to pathogens that could be harmful to humans and/or other wildlife. If you found a dead cow in a field you would certainly not leave it there to rot.

By the way, my suggestion concerning a visit to a local abbattoire was not directed at you personally. With hindsight I should have referred to 'one' rather than 'you' and I do believe it would help youngsters come to terms with these issues once they are old enough to understand properly.

Finally, how on earth you can conclude that correcting a spelling error is a sign or someone who has lost an argument is beyond me. It was my first post in response to yours so, technically, we hadn't even started arguing at that point. Typing the correct spelling of carcasses took no additional time at all.
Ref. Spelling error, I have no issue in admitting that I'm not perfect by any means, not helped by the ipad predictive text which is generally a useful aid which can also hinder as demonstrated in this instance. I profess that I'm not the best at English since it is my second language to Cantonese and have never professed ever to be a scholar in it's application, nor do I wish to be!. However from a basic communication interaction perspective if someone's retort/opening sentence is crictism it is unlikely to be well received, nor is it conducive to the debate. We could sit here all day picking up spelling and grammar mistakes but the pertinent points made were understood, hence why I think purposely putting someone down for self gratification firstly sets a poor example, is unhelpful, is negative and is perceived by many as petty and pedantic especially in this age of modern communication.
How sad. Clearly you have more time on your hands than I.

What about the real issues. Rotting corpses in public places represent a potential health hazard. Period.
Nope your wrong again......I'm actually in HK on business writing off the jetlag by pointing out your complete lack of any emotional intellect and inability to communicate normally and reasonably.
Please don't let me hold you back by wasting your busy body life worrying about complete non-issues, if your so bloody minded and concerned about the problem why don't you pull your finger out get off your lazy backside and sort it out yourself for the good of the community rather than expecting others to do it for you!
Interesting, albeit a totally inaccurate appraisal. By the way it's you're not your.
And you're all talk, no action nor substance. Or would you prefer to converse in Cantonese since your not making much sense using English! Haven't you got a beach to go clean?
So where is your action or substance? By the way the 'your' in your second sentence should also be you're. You are clearly a slow learner.

If you were on the ball you would know that the beach has already been cleaned thanks to the volunteers although you have not given them any credit for their work. I have.

Why would I need to speak Cantonese by the way?
[quote][p][bold]cj07589[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bob Goulding[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cj07589[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bob Goulding[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cj07589[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bob Goulding[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cj07589[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bob Goulding[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cj07589[/bold] wrote: Big deal! what an absolute non-story, there are far more important priorities than whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses it's called nature! nature will decompose the carcuss and returning the materials, minerals back to the sea and land. Perhaps Amanda and Sean should have taken this opportunity to explain to their son that life runs its course and death is a very natural part of that cycle. Often is the case where negatives are initially perceived there are actually great opportunities to be had, as a young lad I would had found this fascinating and much more topical than sitting in a biology classroom on a winter day.[/p][/quote]So ignoring the carcasses for now (note the spelling by the way) what do you think would happen to the rest of the man-made debris unless it is removed by man. There is no natural process that would deal with it. At best it might eventually move elsewhere (very unlikely though given the local hydrography) but in the meantime it would accumulate further and remain a hazard to both wildlife and humans alike. I still believe it would be prudent to be careful about how the dead cow is handled but, if lessons are needed in the reality of life and death in the natural world, there are some excellent DVDs available. However, if you need a more 'first hand experience' you could even arrange a visit to your local abattoir.[/p][/quote]Bob, 'detritus' by definition refers to non-living particulate organic material which specifically excludes human produced composites. I whole heartily endorse the responsible and safe disposal of all man made rubbish spoiling the environment and ecological habitat. My view is that a beached dead cow is actually a food source for other creatures, organisms including bacteria and represents minimal risks to humans provide it is not interfered with. The best advice is do nothing and leave it well alone and let nature take it's course. Thank you for your concern over my educational enlightenment but since I've lived and worked extensively on 10,000 HA farm, I am sufficiently familiar with abattoirs and the reality of what goes on within them. On a final note correcting spelling on the internet is a sure sign of someone who has lost the argument or someone with far too much time on their hands.[/p][/quote]I am glad you agree with me about the importance of clearing up the man-made debris. Your original post ignored this aspect of the clean-up which is what lead me to challenge your view-point. As far as I can tell no-one was 'whinging about clearing up washed up detritus and animal carcusses' it was simply reported that rotting animal corpses were included in the flotsam which made the job especially unpleasant and some walkers found unpalatable. It is to their great credit that the volunteers completed the job despite these unsavoury aspects. I also don't agree that the corpses of large mammals should be left to rot on the beach if they can be removed. We do not know how they perished nor whether their demise involved or has given rise to pathogens that could be harmful to humans and/or other wildlife. If you found a dead cow in a field you would certainly not leave it there to rot. By the way, my suggestion concerning a visit to a local abbattoire was not directed at you personally. With hindsight I should have referred to 'one' rather than 'you' and I do believe it would help youngsters come to terms with these issues once they are old enough to understand properly. Finally, how on earth you can conclude that correcting a spelling error is a sign or someone who has lost an argument is beyond me. It was my first post in response to yours so, technically, we hadn't even started arguing at that point. Typing the correct spelling of carcasses took no additional time at all.[/p][/quote]Ref. Spelling error, I have no issue in admitting that I'm not perfect by any means, not helped by the ipad predictive text which is generally a useful aid which can also hinder as demonstrated in this instance. I profess that I'm not the best at English since it is my second language to Cantonese and have never professed ever to be a scholar in it's application, nor do I wish to be!. However from a basic communication interaction perspective if someone's retort/opening sentence is crictism it is unlikely to be well received, nor is it conducive to the debate. We could sit here all day picking up spelling and grammar mistakes but the pertinent points made were understood, hence why I think purposely putting someone down for self gratification firstly sets a poor example, is unhelpful, is negative and is perceived by many as petty and pedantic especially in this age of modern communication.[/p][/quote]How sad. Clearly you have more time on your hands than I. What about the real issues. Rotting corpses in public places represent a potential health hazard. Period.[/p][/quote]Nope your wrong again......I'm actually in HK on business writing off the jetlag by pointing out your complete lack of any emotional intellect and inability to communicate normally and reasonably. Please don't let me hold you back by wasting your busy body life worrying about complete non-issues, if your so bloody minded and concerned about the problem why don't you pull your finger out get off your lazy backside and sort it out yourself for the good of the community rather than expecting others to do it for you![/p][/quote]Interesting, albeit a totally inaccurate appraisal. By the way it's you're not your.[/p][/quote]And you're all talk, no action nor substance. Or would you prefer to converse in Cantonese since your not making much sense using English! Haven't you got a beach to go clean?[/p][/quote]So where is your action or substance? By the way the 'your' in your second sentence should also be you're. You are clearly a slow learner. If you were on the ball you would know that the beach has already been cleaned thanks to the volunteers although you have not given them any credit for their work. I have. Why would I need to speak Cantonese by the way? Bob Goulding

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