Energy firm reveals wind turbine plans for site east of Charminster

Dorset Echo: Fields and general area of the proposed wind farm north of Dorchester Fields and general area of the proposed wind farm north of Dorchester

AN ENERGY firm planning to erect up to seven wind turbines on agricultural land north of Dorchester has laid out its plans to the town council.

Broadview Energy Limited is currently developing proposals for a wind farm on land at Slyer’s Lane to the east of Charminster.

The scheme would involve up to seven turbines with a maximum height of 125 metres.

As part of Broadview’s commitment to engage and consult with the local community, project manager Tom Cosgrove address Dorchester Town Council’s planning and environment committee to inform them about the proposed scheme.

He said that the exact number of turbines had not been decided yet and the 125m height was also a maximum with no exact details yet decided.

Mr Cosgrove said that the closest any turbine would be to the northern edge of Dorchester was 2.5km and went on to explain why the site had been chosen.

He said there was a suitable wind resource at the location, the road network was suitable as was the connection into the power network and it was not a designated site of interest for ecological or aesthetic reasons.

Mr Cosgrove stressed that his firm was doing all it could to listen to any community concerns as it developed the plans.

He said: “It’s important to us that we speak to as many people as possible so we can at very least hear their concerns and give them the information they need.”

Mr Cosgrove said a site design was expected to be completed by the end of the month and there would be further consultation on that before a planning application is submitted in the summer.

He said that if the planning application was successful the site could be operational within 18 months to two years.

Mr Cosgrove also stated that Broadview would contribute to a community fund if the wind farm was to go ahead, with around £70,000 a year put towards local community projects.

After hearing the presentation, Councillor Richard Biggs said: “I’m broadly in favour of wind farms but I am, like a lot of people concerned about the height.”

Mr Cosgrove responded that when it came to height his firm would have to balance the benefits in terms of power output with any negative impact on the surrounding landscape.

Coun Tim Harries said he was very much in favour of the scheme and wind farms in general.

He said: “I think they are wonderful, let’s get on with it.”

Comments (19)

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2:17pm Wed 5 Feb 14

Budgie@home says...

Tim Harries is a Liberal; thank god they will never get to run the country. Still he probably wont be troubled by the noise and eyesore living in Poundbury.
Tim Harries is a Liberal; thank god they will never get to run the country. Still he probably wont be troubled by the noise and eyesore living in Poundbury. Budgie@home
  • Score: 4

6:38pm Thu 6 Feb 14

chrisholl says...

how much electricity for such an eyesore?
what happens when the wind doesn't blow or its too strong to turn them on?
How about putting them in Mr Harries' garden?
Will locals get a vote on it? Not if the Lib Dems block it like the EU debate in parliament?
how much electricity for such an eyesore? what happens when the wind doesn't blow or its too strong to turn them on? How about putting them in Mr Harries' garden? Will locals get a vote on it? Not if the Lib Dems block it like the EU debate in parliament? chrisholl
  • Score: 1

5:45pm Fri 7 Feb 14

avon52d says...

People should wake up and decide what is the least bad option when it comes to energy.

One of the good things about wind turbines is that if in a few years, no one wants them, them can be removed easily with no effects on the environment. Not so with fracking and other fossil fuels and definitely not so with nuclear which has insane follow on costs when you think of nuclear waste.

I lived on the continent for years close to wind farms and they were just fine, and it was also satisfying to know that as they turned they were generating clean energy.

The arguments about wind strength are just a distraction. Modern north european countries manage just fine and they aren't dissimilar to us in terms of weather.

It's about time we woke up, chose sustainable clean energy and thought about future generations.
People should wake up and decide what is the least bad option when it comes to energy. One of the good things about wind turbines is that if in a few years, no one wants them, them can be removed easily with no effects on the environment. Not so with fracking and other fossil fuels and definitely not so with nuclear which has insane follow on costs when you think of nuclear waste. I lived on the continent for years close to wind farms and they were just fine, and it was also satisfying to know that as they turned they were generating clean energy. The arguments about wind strength are just a distraction. Modern north european countries manage just fine and they aren't dissimilar to us in terms of weather. It's about time we woke up, chose sustainable clean energy and thought about future generations. avon52d
  • Score: 3

6:22pm Fri 7 Feb 14

Budgie@home says...

I respect what you say avon52d but you are overlooking the infrastructure required and more particularly the tons and tons of concrete required for the foundations for these things which will never be removed. And what is the point of all the upset and real distress and harm caused to local residents if there is even the possibility that no one will want them in a few years time? They may generate clean energy while they are working but there is huge cost in subsidies which tends to affect our poor and elderly and what about the 100% standby that is required for when they are not generating. This will be from nuclear or more likely from C02 emitting conventional generators or even worse the Governments Short Term Operating Reserve (STOR) which is diesel generated in the main and is subsidised even more so than industrial wind turbines. These turbines are a con from a government which is trying to win votes from the greens rather than give us what we need which is a reliable and affordable source of energy.
I respect what you say avon52d but you are overlooking the infrastructure required and more particularly the tons and tons of concrete required for the foundations for these things which will never be removed. And what is the point of all the upset and real distress and harm caused to local residents if there is even the possibility that no one will want them in a few years time? They may generate clean energy while they are working but there is huge cost in subsidies which tends to affect our poor and elderly and what about the 100% standby that is required for when they are not generating. This will be from nuclear or more likely from C02 emitting conventional generators or even worse the Governments Short Term Operating Reserve (STOR) which is diesel generated in the main and is subsidised even more so than industrial wind turbines. These turbines are a con from a government which is trying to win votes from the greens rather than give us what we need which is a reliable and affordable source of energy. Budgie@home
  • Score: 0

6:25pm Fri 7 Feb 14

Ivy says...

Excellent news, hopefully DCC will show common sense and grant permission for this, especially as it will contribute to Dorset's Renewable energy targets. It's also far better that more oil or gas extraction.
Excellent news, hopefully DCC will show common sense and grant permission for this, especially as it will contribute to Dorset's Renewable energy targets. It's also far better that more oil or gas extraction. Ivy
  • Score: 0

6:36pm Fri 7 Feb 14

Budgie@home says...

Ivy wrote:
Excellent news, hopefully DCC will show common sense and grant permission for this, especially as it will contribute to Dorset's Renewable energy targets. It's also far better that more oil or gas extraction.
err, why is it far better and what is the point of these targets and what are they anyway?
[quote][p][bold]Ivy[/bold] wrote: Excellent news, hopefully DCC will show common sense and grant permission for this, especially as it will contribute to Dorset's Renewable energy targets. It's also far better that more oil or gas extraction.[/p][/quote]err, why is it far better and what is the point of these targets and what are they anyway? Budgie@home
  • Score: 1

8:40pm Fri 7 Feb 14

IDontKnow0 says...

My kids primary school has a turbine in their field. The kids all love it. It's not as big as you think and I think I've only seen it at complete stand still once or twice a year.
I would rather that than risk the quality of my drinking water through fracking or build up a stockpile of nuclear waste waiting for some natural disaster/ accident to cause massive, damaging radiation leaks. We really need to stop being selfishly narrow minded on this one and learn from our past mistakes not keep making the same ones in blind hope 'it'll be ok'.
We are only borrowing this planet from future generations, let's try not to totally abuse it for them?
My kids primary school has a turbine in their field. The kids all love it. It's not as big as you think and I think I've only seen it at complete stand still once or twice a year. I would rather that than risk the quality of my drinking water through fracking or build up a stockpile of nuclear waste waiting for some natural disaster/ accident to cause massive, damaging radiation leaks. We really need to stop being selfishly narrow minded on this one and learn from our past mistakes not keep making the same ones in blind hope 'it'll be ok'. We are only borrowing this planet from future generations, let's try not to totally abuse it for them? IDontKnow0
  • Score: 2

8:52pm Fri 7 Feb 14

Budgie@home says...

IDontKnow0 wrote:
My kids primary school has a turbine in their field. The kids all love it. It's not as big as you think and I think I've only seen it at complete stand still once or twice a year.
I would rather that than risk the quality of my drinking water through fracking or build up a stockpile of nuclear waste waiting for some natural disaster/ accident to cause massive, damaging radiation leaks. We really need to stop being selfishly narrow minded on this one and learn from our past mistakes not keep making the same ones in blind hope 'it'll be ok'.
We are only borrowing this planet from future generations, let's try not to totally abuse it for them?
The point is that the proposed turbines here are 125 Metres high (410 feet in old money - higher than Salisbury Cathedral which is as big as I can possibly think) and you cannot do without old technology. They are not a replacement and at best are only a supplement because you need electricity 24/7. In other word they are pointless.
[quote][p][bold]IDontKnow0[/bold] wrote: My kids primary school has a turbine in their field. The kids all love it. It's not as big as you think and I think I've only seen it at complete stand still once or twice a year. I would rather that than risk the quality of my drinking water through fracking or build up a stockpile of nuclear waste waiting for some natural disaster/ accident to cause massive, damaging radiation leaks. We really need to stop being selfishly narrow minded on this one and learn from our past mistakes not keep making the same ones in blind hope 'it'll be ok'. We are only borrowing this planet from future generations, let's try not to totally abuse it for them?[/p][/quote]The point is that the proposed turbines here are 125 Metres high (410 feet in old money - higher than Salisbury Cathedral which is as big as I can possibly think) and you cannot do without old technology. They are not a replacement and at best are only a supplement because you need electricity 24/7. In other word they are pointless. Budgie@home
  • Score: 1

9:23pm Fri 7 Feb 14

IDontKnow0 says...

Surely they would store unused energy on the extra windy days to compensate for the not so windy days??
I'm sure some people didn't like Salisbury cathedral when that was first built either... probably?!
At least it's the less pollutive option. Granted it may not be so aesthetically pleasing as say a nuclear power plant but I guess we can't have our cake and eat it?
Surely they would store unused energy on the extra windy days to compensate for the not so windy days?? I'm sure some people didn't like Salisbury cathedral when that was first built either... probably?! At least it's the less pollutive option. Granted it may not be so aesthetically pleasing as say a nuclear power plant but I guess we can't have our cake and eat it? IDontKnow0
  • Score: 2

9:31pm Fri 7 Feb 14

Budgie@home says...

IDontKnow0 wrote:
Surely they would store unused energy on the extra windy days to compensate for the not so windy days??
I'm sure some people didn't like Salisbury cathedral when that was first built either... probably?!
At least it's the less pollutive option. Granted it may not be so aesthetically pleasing as say a nuclear power plant but I guess we can't have our cake and eat it?
That's the problem. You can't store the electricity that is produced. These developers conjure up a rosy picture that they power x number of houses as if you simply plug in to their production and that's all there is to worry about. The reality is that the electricity they produce is intermittent and unreliable which means that you have to have 100% backup from a reliable source. This will inevitable mean using existing technology or worse the Governments Short Term Operating reserve which means power from diesel generators. In other words the green credentials goes to pot.
[quote][p][bold]IDontKnow0[/bold] wrote: Surely they would store unused energy on the extra windy days to compensate for the not so windy days?? I'm sure some people didn't like Salisbury cathedral when that was first built either... probably?! At least it's the less pollutive option. Granted it may not be so aesthetically pleasing as say a nuclear power plant but I guess we can't have our cake and eat it?[/p][/quote]That's the problem. You can't store the electricity that is produced. These developers conjure up a rosy picture that they power x number of houses as if you simply plug in to their production and that's all there is to worry about. The reality is that the electricity they produce is intermittent and unreliable which means that you have to have 100% backup from a reliable source. This will inevitable mean using existing technology or worse the Governments Short Term Operating reserve which means power from diesel generators. In other words the green credentials goes to pot. Budgie@home
  • Score: 1

11:46pm Fri 7 Feb 14

felicityrg says...

I love Dorset! Have only visited a few times and it's such a beautiful green place with lovely people. Would be positively *encouraged* to visit even more often and it would make coming even more fab if there was more locally produced renewable energy from wind turbines in particular - seemed to be hardly any! Yes you can see them in the landscape, but surely that's a positive sign of giving a **** about the future and our children (and grandchildren) by choosing a positive clean and local way to power our homes etc rather than an old polluting way. And it seems they are really effective - see this article from 'good energy' - a small Wiltshire based energy firm that I think are really trustworthy (not like the big six energy company rip off merchants) http://www.goodenerg
y.co.uk/generate/cho
osing-your-technolog
y/home-generation/wi
nd-turbines/facts-ab
out-wind-farms
I love Dorset! Have only visited a few times and it's such a beautiful green place with lovely people. Would be positively *encouraged* to visit even more often and it would make coming even more fab if there was more locally produced renewable energy from wind turbines in particular - seemed to be hardly any! Yes you can see them in the landscape, but surely that's a positive sign of giving a **** about the future and our children (and grandchildren) by choosing a positive clean and local way to power our homes etc rather than an old polluting way. And it seems they are really effective - see this article from 'good energy' - a small Wiltshire based energy firm that I think are really trustworthy (not like the big six energy company rip off merchants) http://www.goodenerg y.co.uk/generate/cho osing-your-technolog y/home-generation/wi nd-turbines/facts-ab out-wind-farms felicityrg
  • Score: 1

12:41am Sat 8 Feb 14

IDontKnow0 says...

So, if you could only make use of them say - I don't know - 30% of the time? They would still reduce the amount of 'bad energy' by 30%(?). It may not be 'the' solution but it could be part of many, so it seems a good start?
So, if you could only make use of them say - I don't know - 30% of the time? They would still reduce the amount of 'bad energy' by 30%(?). It may not be 'the' solution but it could be part of many, so it seems a good start? IDontKnow0
  • Score: 0

8:50am Sat 8 Feb 14

Budgie@home says...

IDontKnow0 wrote:
So, if you could only make use of them say - I don't know - 30% of the time? They would still reduce the amount of 'bad energy' by 30%(?). It may not be 'the' solution but it could be part of many, so it seems a good start?
Hi,
For the facts about this particular proposal I suggest that you visit noslyerslaneturbines
.co.uk and for the Tolpuddle proposal Google TAINT. Unfortunately they don't reduce "bad energy" by their output for the reasons I mention above. Wind turbines even on this industrial scale are as much use as throwing a few sandbags at the Somerset Levels but it makes people feel better if they believe they are doing something however misguided that is.
[quote][p][bold]IDontKnow0[/bold] wrote: So, if you could only make use of them say - I don't know - 30% of the time? They would still reduce the amount of 'bad energy' by 30%(?). It may not be 'the' solution but it could be part of many, so it seems a good start?[/p][/quote]Hi, For the facts about this particular proposal I suggest that you visit noslyerslaneturbines .co.uk and for the Tolpuddle proposal Google TAINT. Unfortunately they don't reduce "bad energy" by their output for the reasons I mention above. Wind turbines even on this industrial scale are as much use as throwing a few sandbags at the Somerset Levels but it makes people feel better if they believe they are doing something however misguided that is. Budgie@home
  • Score: -1

4:26pm Sat 8 Feb 14

jch78* says...

Budgie@home wrote:
IDontKnow0 wrote:
So, if you could only make use of them say - I don't know - 30% of the time? They would still reduce the amount of 'bad energy' by 30%(?). It may not be 'the' solution but it could be part of many, so it seems a good start?
Hi,
For the facts about this particular proposal I suggest that you visit noslyerslaneturbines

.co.uk and for the Tolpuddle proposal Google TAINT. Unfortunately they don't reduce "bad energy" by their output for the reasons I mention above. Wind turbines even on this industrial scale are as much use as throwing a few sandbags at the Somerset Levels but it makes people feel better if they believe they are doing something however misguided that is.
Please don't rely on the websites mentioned in the comment above for "the facts" - these websites are not impartial and are full of emotive phrases such as "giant industrial" which are designed to alienate people without giving them the real facts. We in Dorset have a responsibility to play our part in the generation of renewable energy, which is needed if we are to avoid the worst effects of climate change. Wind turbines must be included as one of the ways to do this because Dorset happens to have good wind resources. Failing to act on climate change will have far worse consequences on the landscape of our beautiful county.
[quote][p][bold]Budgie@home[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]IDontKnow0[/bold] wrote: So, if you could only make use of them say - I don't know - 30% of the time? They would still reduce the amount of 'bad energy' by 30%(?). It may not be 'the' solution but it could be part of many, so it seems a good start?[/p][/quote]Hi, For the facts about this particular proposal I suggest that you visit noslyerslaneturbines .co.uk and for the Tolpuddle proposal Google TAINT. Unfortunately they don't reduce "bad energy" by their output for the reasons I mention above. Wind turbines even on this industrial scale are as much use as throwing a few sandbags at the Somerset Levels but it makes people feel better if they believe they are doing something however misguided that is.[/p][/quote]Please don't rely on the websites mentioned in the comment above for "the facts" - these websites are not impartial and are full of emotive phrases such as "giant industrial" which are designed to alienate people without giving them the real facts. We in Dorset have a responsibility to play our part in the generation of renewable energy, which is needed if we are to avoid the worst effects of climate change. Wind turbines must be included as one of the ways to do this because Dorset happens to have good wind resources. Failing to act on climate change will have far worse consequences on the landscape of our beautiful county. jch78*
  • Score: 0

7:54pm Sat 8 Feb 14

Budgie@home says...

jch78* wrote:
Budgie@home wrote:
IDontKnow0 wrote:
So, if you could only make use of them say - I don't know - 30% of the time? They would still reduce the amount of 'bad energy' by 30%(?). It may not be 'the' solution but it could be part of many, so it seems a good start?
Hi,
For the facts about this particular proposal I suggest that you visit noslyerslaneturbines


.co.uk and for the Tolpuddle proposal Google TAINT. Unfortunately they don't reduce "bad energy" by their output for the reasons I mention above. Wind turbines even on this industrial scale are as much use as throwing a few sandbags at the Somerset Levels but it makes people feel better if they believe they are doing something however misguided that is.
Please don't rely on the websites mentioned in the comment above for "the facts" - these websites are not impartial and are full of emotive phrases such as "giant industrial" which are designed to alienate people without giving them the real facts. We in Dorset have a responsibility to play our part in the generation of renewable energy, which is needed if we are to avoid the worst effects of climate change. Wind turbines must be included as one of the ways to do this because Dorset happens to have good wind resources. Failing to act on climate change will have far worse consequences on the landscape of our beautiful county.
Too right "giant industrial" are emotive phrases but they happen to be true.
[quote][p][bold]jch78*[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Budgie@home[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]IDontKnow0[/bold] wrote: So, if you could only make use of them say - I don't know - 30% of the time? They would still reduce the amount of 'bad energy' by 30%(?). It may not be 'the' solution but it could be part of many, so it seems a good start?[/p][/quote]Hi, For the facts about this particular proposal I suggest that you visit noslyerslaneturbines .co.uk and for the Tolpuddle proposal Google TAINT. Unfortunately they don't reduce "bad energy" by their output for the reasons I mention above. Wind turbines even on this industrial scale are as much use as throwing a few sandbags at the Somerset Levels but it makes people feel better if they believe they are doing something however misguided that is.[/p][/quote]Please don't rely on the websites mentioned in the comment above for "the facts" - these websites are not impartial and are full of emotive phrases such as "giant industrial" which are designed to alienate people without giving them the real facts. We in Dorset have a responsibility to play our part in the generation of renewable energy, which is needed if we are to avoid the worst effects of climate change. Wind turbines must be included as one of the ways to do this because Dorset happens to have good wind resources. Failing to act on climate change will have far worse consequences on the landscape of our beautiful county.[/p][/quote]Too right "giant industrial" are emotive phrases but they happen to be true. Budgie@home
  • Score: -1

6:33pm Sat 15 Feb 14

Natasha15 says...

This looks like a fantastic idea, I love seeing wind projects making the most of nature and enhancing our great island environment
This looks like a fantastic idea, I love seeing wind projects making the most of nature and enhancing our great island environment Natasha15
  • Score: -1

6:36pm Sat 15 Feb 14

Budgie@home says...

Rubbish!
Rubbish! Budgie@home
  • Score: 1

8:48am Sun 16 Feb 14

Len Herbert says...

they profit and our environment suffers, renewable energy community partnerships are the way forward - can't people see they have us over a barrel and are laughing at us
http://www.independe
nt.co.uk/news/busine
ss/news/your-bills-h
elp-british-gas-to-6
00m-profit-9131082.h
tml
they profit and our environment suffers, renewable energy community partnerships are the way forward - can't people see they have us over a barrel and are laughing at us http://www.independe nt.co.uk/news/busine ss/news/your-bills-h elp-british-gas-to-6 00m-profit-9131082.h tml Len Herbert
  • Score: -1

2:29pm Wed 19 Feb 14

Len Herbert says...

only today yet more evidence its the way to go http://www.irishtime
s.com/news/environme
nt/wind-power-has-sa
ved-1bn-in-fuel-cost
s-seai-claims-1.1696
202
only today yet more evidence its the way to go http://www.irishtime s.com/news/environme nt/wind-power-has-sa ved-1bn-in-fuel-cost s-seai-claims-1.1696 202 Len Herbert
  • Score: 1

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