Dead birds washed up on Chesil Beach

Dorset Echo: SCENE: Dead birds laid out on Chesil Beach. Picture: Izzy Imset SCENE: Dead birds laid out on Chesil Beach. Picture: Izzy Imset

A HUGE amount of dead birds have washed up on Chesil Beach.

Some of the 100 or so different species have been found alive but the majority are dead or in distress.

Storms have washed them onto the beach.

Birds such as razorbills, guillemots and two kittiwakes have been found.

Five dead puffins, which are species of European conservation concern, have also been washed up.

Some of these birds were covered in oil, and those found alive are exhausted and need time to recover, says Dorset Wildlife Trust.

Concerned conservation officers have been able to rescue some of the stranded birds.  A trapped razorbill, stuck inside an empty metal cage filled with shingle to stabilise the shoreline was freed by Angela Thomas, Assistant Warden at the Chesil Bank and Fleet Nature Reserve.

She said: “The force of the waves had emptied the shingle from the metal cage, but somehow a razorbill had become trapped inside – it was hard to get it out, and we had no idea how it got in there.  It would not have escaped without our help, so we’re glad we managed to spot it.”  

Fine Foundation Chesil Beach Centre Officer Marc Smith said: “Whilst we usually see dead birds washed up on the beach in the winter, these storms have made life much harder for them.

"Birds being found alive are tired and hungry because they are weak from fighting against the harsh conditions.

"The death of these birds is an even bigger blow after the huge loss during the PIB incident last year, where over 1,000 seabirds were found dead on the South Coast, covered in a deadly sticky glue substance.

"It is sad to find more dead birds along Chesil Beach, but an inevitable consequence of the storms and high tides.” 

Chesil Centre Officers will be monitoring the beach to try and rescue as many birds as possible, but Dorset Wildlife Trust is advising the public not to touch dead or injured birds.

If you see a dead or injured bird on Chesil Beach, please contact the DWT Chesil Beach Centre on 01305 206191, or phone the RSPCA on 0300 1234 999.

 

Comments (4)

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1:49pm Mon 10 Feb 14

IDONTKNOWIFITISTRRUE says...

Pity the birds but nice of them to line up in neat rows to die!
Pity the birds but nice of them to line up in neat rows to die! IDONTKNOWIFITISTRRUE
  • Score: -17

3:27pm Mon 10 Feb 14

Tinker2 says...

Fine Foundation Chesil Beach Centre Officer Marc Smith said: “Whilst we usually see dead birds washed up on the beach in the winter, these storms have made life much harder for them.
It is sad to find more dead birds along Chesil Beach, but an inevitable consequence of the storms and high tides.”
What Poppycock!!!! Mr Smith you should know better than to just say their deaths are from natural causes and inevitable. Shame on you sir, these birds are covered in oil !

Over recent decades oil pollution has had a very serious effect on guillemot numbers. They suffer badly from oil because their natural reaction is to dive, so becoming even more polluted, whereas other seabirds such as gulls take off and can escape.
Commercial shipping is known to wash tanks and empty bilges when at sea in storms, because it goes by less noticed and they believe the storm wave action will disperse their polution.
Guillemots have also suffered from the overfishing of sand eels and sprats by humans. Conservationists would like to see this controlled because it is believed to be causing hundreds of birds to starve.
Guillemots are lovely little birds, penguin-like in appearance; slim, pointed bill, dark brown head and upperparts, white underparts.

Conservationists and those that wish to show some responsibility, should speak out against polution of our seas and the killing of our seabirds.
Fine Foundation Chesil Beach Centre Officer Marc Smith said: “Whilst we usually see dead birds washed up on the beach in the winter, these storms have made life much harder for them. It is sad to find more dead birds along Chesil Beach, but an inevitable consequence of the storms and high tides.” What Poppycock!!!! Mr Smith you should know better than to just say their deaths are from natural causes and inevitable. Shame on you sir, these birds are covered in oil ! Over recent decades oil pollution has had a very serious effect on guillemot numbers. They suffer badly from oil because their natural reaction is to dive, so becoming even more polluted, whereas other seabirds such as gulls take off and can escape. Commercial shipping is known to wash tanks and empty bilges when at sea in storms, because it goes by less noticed and they believe the storm wave action will disperse their polution. Guillemots have also suffered from the overfishing of sand eels and sprats by humans. Conservationists would like to see this controlled because it is believed to be causing hundreds of birds to starve. Guillemots are lovely little birds, penguin-like in appearance; slim, pointed bill, dark brown head and upperparts, white underparts. Conservationists and those that wish to show some responsibility, should speak out against polution of our seas and the killing of our seabirds. Tinker2
  • Score: 9

3:08am Tue 11 Feb 14

Dorsetdumpling says...

So, how many were actually covered in oil, as compared to, say, how many were caught up in the wire shingle cages set up for coastal defence?
So, how many were actually covered in oil, as compared to, say, how many were caught up in the wire shingle cages set up for coastal defence? Dorsetdumpling
  • Score: 3

12:15pm Tue 11 Feb 14

rjimmer says...

I bet if you found a distressed bird half-way along the beach and rang the numbers provided, they wouldn't do anything.
I bet if you found a distressed bird half-way along the beach and rang the numbers provided, they wouldn't do anything. rjimmer
  • Score: -3

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