STORM CHAOS: Inconsiderate walkers ignore warning signs hindering clean-up operation by EA workers

Dorset Echo: Heavy machinery at work on Preston Beach at Overcombe Corner Buy this photo Heavy machinery at work on Preston Beach at Overcombe Corner

WALKERS have been criticised for not heeding closure signs at Preston Beach.

Some people are ignoring footpath closure signs and ‘exerting their right to walk where it is clearly dangerous’ the Environment Agency said.

The EA has been working with Weymouth and Portland Borough Council and the military to repair and reinforce the sea defences while the weather is calm.

It is continuing with the repair work to bury rock into Preston Beach to give it some strength as a buffer against future storms.

A spokesman said: “There is one area of health and safety that is causing the Agency some concern. Some people are ignoring footpath closure signs and exerting their right to walk where it is clearly dangerous.

“When this happens the Environment Agency has to stop machines to let them pass and therefore this is holding up the recovery process.”

Comments (5)

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4:43pm Mon 17 Feb 14

Scruples says...

The Health & Safety of everyone is paramount plus the window to repair the sea defence had to be carried out on the first decent day since the storm. However I do sympathise with the walkers, who after so many days of being told to stay at home were able to venture out then found themselves facing the closure on Preston Beach. Again not condoning their actions the ludicrous situation would not have arisen if there was free parking in Weymouth on Sundays so Individuals, couples and families were able to park without concern about the expense, length of time and worry of a parking ticket. Taking nothing away from the beautiful scenery but this is why so many people park at Preston / Bowleze because they can relax and avoid being ripped off. Surely by the nature of all these walkers parking in Weymouth town centre for free on a Sunday, they would have to walk through the town keeping Weymouth busy all year round and maybe spending money whilst there.
The Health & Safety of everyone is paramount plus the window to repair the sea defence had to be carried out on the first decent day since the storm. However I do sympathise with the walkers, who after so many days of being told to stay at home were able to venture out then found themselves facing the closure on Preston Beach. Again not condoning their actions the ludicrous situation would not have arisen if there was free parking in Weymouth on Sundays so Individuals, couples and families were able to park without concern about the expense, length of time and worry of a parking ticket. Taking nothing away from the beautiful scenery but this is why so many people park at Preston / Bowleze because they can relax and avoid being ripped off. Surely by the nature of all these walkers parking in Weymouth town centre for free on a Sunday, they would have to walk through the town keeping Weymouth busy all year round and maybe spending money whilst there. Scruples
  • Score: -8

6:33pm Mon 17 Feb 14

35vulcan35 says...

The reason people were still walking on Preston Beach promenade was because the "closure" was unneccessary and 'over the top' . Provided walkers kept off the beach area where the machinery and men were working, which from my observations they did, there was no reason not to walk on the promenade. There was no shingle or stones from the paddling pool area to at least half way down to the 'Oasis' cafe. Even though there were stones on the walkway at the Overcombe end, it was just the same as walking on stones on a beach. Just needs a little bit of care and common sense ! I can fully understand people do not wish to be patronised to the point that they are treated like plebs who are incapable of making a decision whether it is safe to walk on a few stones.
The reason people were still walking on Preston Beach promenade was because the "closure" was unneccessary and 'over the top' . Provided walkers kept off the beach area where the machinery and men were working, which from my observations they did, there was no reason not to walk on the promenade. There was no shingle or stones from the paddling pool area to at least half way down to the 'Oasis' cafe. Even though there were stones on the walkway at the Overcombe end, it was just the same as walking on stones on a beach. Just needs a little bit of care and common sense ! I can fully understand people do not wish to be patronised to the point that they are treated like plebs who are incapable of making a decision whether it is safe to walk on a few stones. 35vulcan35
  • Score: 0

1:49pm Tue 18 Feb 14

Dorsetdumpling says...

Now would that be the sign that said :

'footpath closed'
(assuming of course they had the legal right to close a footpath or right of way),

or the sign that said :

'due to ongoing work please keep to the concrete path'
(both were within a few feet of each other approaching from the Bowleaze end.
Now would that be the sign that said : 'footpath closed' (assuming of course they had the legal right to close a footpath or right of way), or the sign that said : 'due to ongoing work please keep to the concrete path' (both were within a few feet of each other approaching from the Bowleaze end. Dorsetdumpling
  • Score: 0

2:27pm Tue 18 Feb 14

Scruples says...

Well done vulcan for not only missing or ignoring the signs at the start of the beach promenade but for missing my point by a mile.
Well done vulcan for not only missing or ignoring the signs at the start of the beach promenade but for missing my point by a mile. Scruples
  • Score: 0

9:39pm Tue 18 Feb 14

35vulcan35 says...

Scruples - no I have not 'missed your point by a mile' . I agree with the first to lines of your original text. The rest is irrelevant because it has nothing to do with the subject initially raised. Parking restrictions have nothing to do with promenade closures, machinery and workmen on the beach, or stones on the promenade. I am very safety conscious, but o occasions health & safety measures are way 'over the top' and therefore lose their credibility - the closure of the promenade being an example. I repeat, provided walkers did not go onto the beach where the work was being carried out, which from my observations, no-one did, there was no reason not to walk on the promenade provided a bit of extra care was taken near the Overcombe end, where stones were on the walkway. I use the promenade regularly, and note that walkers, runners, cyclists and dog walkers are considerate and safety conscious almost always. My point, keeping to the original subject, is that the closure was not necessary. The fact that so many people ignored the closure signs proves that I was not alone in my thoughts.
Scruples - no I have not 'missed your point by a mile' . I agree with the first to lines of your original text. The rest is irrelevant because it has nothing to do with the subject initially raised. Parking restrictions have nothing to do with promenade closures, machinery and workmen on the beach, or stones on the promenade. I am very safety conscious, but o occasions health & safety measures are way 'over the top' and therefore lose their credibility - the closure of the promenade being an example. I repeat, provided walkers did not go onto the beach where the work was being carried out, which from my observations, no-one did, there was no reason not to walk on the promenade provided a bit of extra care was taken near the Overcombe end, where stones were on the walkway. I use the promenade regularly, and note that walkers, runners, cyclists and dog walkers are considerate and safety conscious almost always. My point, keeping to the original subject, is that the closure was not necessary. The fact that so many people ignored the closure signs proves that I was not alone in my thoughts. 35vulcan35
  • Score: 0

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