AFTER THE STORMS: Boulders there to protect repairs from future storms, says Environment Agency

ON THE MOVE? Boulders on Chesil Beach

ON THE MOVE? Boulders on Chesil Beach

First published in News Dorset Echo: Photograph of the Author by , Reporter

THE Environment Agency has revealed the purpose of the Chesil Beach boulders.

A spokesman said: “The rock which has been delivered to site will be used to create a temporary access to allow the repairs to go ahead.

“The rock may be used to protect the repairs from attack by future severe storms, buried beneath the shingle which continues to make its way back into the beach.

“The precise configuration of rock beneath the sea wall is under technical review while the piling and concrete repairs are being progressed as a matter of some urgency.”

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8:08am Fri 28 Feb 14

arlbergbahn says...

Why do official spokespersons always use such ponderous language? I'm still not sure what he actually means. They seem such a secretive and defensive organisation that seems to do whatever they want and just look down their nose at the temerity of anyone who questions them.
Why do official spokespersons always use such ponderous language? I'm still not sure what he actually means. They seem such a secretive and defensive organisation that seems to do whatever they want and just look down their nose at the temerity of anyone who questions them. arlbergbahn
  • Score: 4

10:57am Fri 28 Feb 14

portland rebel says...

it means they dont know what they are doing, but then they know better.
it means they dont know what they are doing, but then they know better. portland rebel
  • Score: 0

12:10pm Fri 28 Feb 14

portlandboy says...

The EA spokesman said:
“The rock may be used to protect the repairs from attack by future severe storms, buried beneath the shingle which continues to make its way back into the beach.
The precise configuration of rock beneath the sea wall is under technical review.."

What he meant was:
The rock cost a hell of a lot of money to transport to the beach and there is honestly little point in paying to take it away later because it will bury itself under the pebbles when nature rebuilds the beach.
Nobody ever bothered to detail what the bedrock was like, because it is obviously the same as the rest of Portland, but we'll spend the money that we save by not removing the rock on making sure the bedrock is the same as the rest of Portland.
The EA spokesman said: “The rock may be used to protect the repairs from attack by future severe storms, buried beneath the shingle which continues to make its way back into the beach. The precise configuration of rock beneath the sea wall is under technical review.." What he meant was: The rock cost a hell of a lot of money to transport to the beach and there is honestly little point in paying to take it away later because it will bury itself under the pebbles when nature rebuilds the beach. Nobody ever bothered to detail what the bedrock was like, because it is obviously the same as the rest of Portland, but we'll spend the money that we save by not removing the rock on making sure the bedrock is the same as the rest of Portland. portlandboy
  • Score: 2

12:28pm Fri 28 Feb 14

irisred says...

So the sea is gradually drawing them back in but if we do have another powerful storm before they've been reclaimed by the ocean then they'll be hurled at the sea defences or beyond causing more damage. But its fine as they may evenutally get covered with shingle before this happens...

Fills me with confidence!
So the sea is gradually drawing them back in but if we do have another powerful storm before they've been reclaimed by the ocean then they'll be hurled at the sea defences or beyond causing more damage. But its fine as they may evenutally get covered with shingle before this happens... Fills me with confidence! irisred
  • Score: 1

9:50pm Fri 28 Feb 14

Tinker2 says...

arlbergbahn wrote:
Why do official spokespersons always use such ponderous language? I'm still not sure what he actually means. They seem such a secretive and defensive organisation that seems to do whatever they want and just look down their nose at the temerity of anyone who questions them.
What else would you expect from a government organisation?
I understand the Environment Agency last year received a £723m grant from the taxpayer and spent in total £1207m, the rest paid for by charges. The organisation is huge with over 12,000 civil servants, none of which, it would appear, know anything about sea defences and the geology of chesil beach..
[quote][p][bold]arlbergbahn[/bold] wrote: Why do official spokespersons always use such ponderous language? I'm still not sure what he actually means. They seem such a secretive and defensive organisation that seems to do whatever they want and just look down their nose at the temerity of anyone who questions them.[/p][/quote]What else would you expect from a government organisation? I understand the Environment Agency last year received a £723m grant from the taxpayer and spent in total £1207m, the rest paid for by charges. The organisation is huge with over 12,000 civil servants, none of which, it would appear, know anything about sea defences and the geology of chesil beach.. Tinker2
  • Score: 0

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