Call for action as number of empty shops in Weymouth reaches 27

Call for action as number of empty shops in Weymouth reaches 27

CHAMBER: Julie Cleaver, president of Weymouth and Portland Chamber of Commerce,

BRANDED: RLA's Sam Butcher giving a presentation at the Mulberry Gallery

CLOTHES: Mary Reese of Ladybirds in St Alban Street

BID: Alison Theobald, co-chairman of the Weymouth Business Improvement District

AFRICAN FOOD: Gary and Sue Seymour

RATES CALL: Richard Drax MP

First published in News Dorset Echo: Photograph of the Author by , Trainee Reporter

CALLS are being made to revitalise Weymouth town centre as the number of empty shops continues to rise.

The Echo discovered there were 27 empty premises in the centre of town.

In February last year, the Echo found 20 properties vacant and three shops with closing down sales in the same area.

Julie Cleaver, president of Weymouth and Portland Chamber of Commerce, confirmed the chamber had a budget to look at the empty shops in Weymouth.

She said they would be looking at how to make the shops look more appealing to business owners as well as visually attractive.

This will tie in with the £100,000 marketing campaign to attract holidaymakers to Weymouth, funded by the Weymouth Business Improvement District (BID).

She said: “We are at the early stages. We are going to do it in conjunction with the brand launch.

“I’m not saying it’s the answer. It’s using the best of what we’ve got.”

She added: “It’s enticing people to come and use the area because of what they are seeing in the visuals.”

Councillor Ian Munro-Price, brief holder for economic development for Weymouth and Portland Borough Council, suggested the closure of shops was a sign of people’s changing shopping habits.

“I think that the town centre is one very visible part of the economy, but it’s not the whole economy” he said.

“It is a shame to see boarded up shops and restaurants. It’s a national problem in some ways. It seems as though we as consumers don’t shop in town centres in the way that we used to.”

Coun Munro-Price’s claim coincides with the government’s latest plans to assist small high street businesses.

A high street tax break is set to be implemented across the country to assist 300,000 retail shops in the next few weeks.

Retail premises will be eligible for an annual £1,000 discount over the next two years if they are occupied and have a rateable value below £50,000.

Coun Munro-Price suggested town centres will reinvent themselves as social hubs, which in turn will help draw more people to the area.

He revealed his own company Red House Estate Agents had recently taken over an empty shop in Westham Road.

Coun Munro-Price added: “Buildings in the commercial centre won’t stay empty for too long.”

However, a number of properties still remain vacant despite closing more than a year ago.

The Shirt Shack in Coburg Place closed down in November 2012, a decision influenced by poor trading and increased business rates. Its building has since been left unoccupied, still displaying posters from the shop’s closing down sale.

The increasing number of empty properties sheds a new light on the Olympic legacy for the Weymouth area.

Olympic related schemes helped implement £177 million of funding into the Weymouth and Portland area for facilities, regeneration and transport projects.

Mark Blunden, a renewable energy advisor at Puragen, a company based in Dorchester, said he would like to see local and national authorities take greater advantage of the Olympic legacy.

He said: “It has been a missed opportunity and we’ve had this millions of pounds of taxpayers’ money spent on the infrastructure, but the circus arrived, the circus left.”

New research, however, does suggest there’s been a marked improvement in the number of empty shops on the UK’s high streets.

The Local Data Company revealed average vacancy rates were below 14 per cent for the first time in four years.

Speaking before this research was published, Mr Blunden said Weymouth was faring better than other towns and cities.

He said: “If you look at the national average of shops closed percentage per town centre, then Weymouth is above average.

“It might not look it when you walk around and see the boarded-up shops, but there is too much retail based on demand. “Weymouth has a little too much retail. I could take you to towns around the country where they’re far worse off than we are.”

The area surveyed included St Thomas Street, St Mary Street, Bond Street, New Bond Street, School Street, Westham Road, Frederick Place, Coburg Place, Great George Street, St Alban Street and St Edmund Street.

The figure included five empty units at Colwell Shopping Centre on School Street.

MIDDLE CLASS TOURISTS TARGETED BY CAMPAIGN

BUSINESSES hope a new marketing campaign will attract middle class holidaymakers to Weymouth.

Details and artwork from the £100,000 campaign, which is funded by the Weymouth Business Improvement District (BID), was unveiled yesterday.

Scores of levy payers flocked to the Mulberry Gallery at Weymouth Library to find out more.

The marketing initiative, which will also include a website, is a move away from the resort’s traditional bucket and spade image.

It comes after the BID, which was voted in by town centre traders last year, identified promoting Weymouth and tackling seasonality as among its main priorities.

Christchurch marketing company RLA successfully pitched for the campaign.

It is designed to plug the gap left by cuts to tourism funding in the borough.

Groups of people specifically targeted by the campaign are ‘busy bees’ and ‘empty nesters’.

These are described as ‘professional’ families with young children who live in cul-de-sacs and are ‘reasonably well off’, spend their weekends on mini-breaks and have ‘money to spend’.

The other target audience is ‘empty nesters’, couples who are still very active and whose children have left home.

Sophie Kermani Jibet, of The Dining Room, praised the marketing initiative and urged other business owners to make the most of it.

She said: “If we look at London and Amsterdam and a lot of other places – they all have this type of branding.

“Something needs to be done to attract more people to Weymouth and the council has no funding to do it.

“We can’t just sit back and wait for something to happen.

“If you have a business in Weymouth we should all work together to get more people to the town.”

Levy payer and tourism marketer Andy Cooke said: “I think it is a great brand and investment.

“Those creative people in the town will be able to run with it and make the most of something positive.”

Emma Cogan, of The Dorset Burger Company, said: “I really like the brand – it looks really exciting.

“We have backed some of the BID events before and we really want to be involved in this.

“It is a chance for Weymouth to show what it has to offer.”

However, Mark Noble, of Weymouth creative agency Supreme PBA, questioned why the BID had gone to a company outside of the borough for branding.

He said: “It seems like people in the town have been hit with this idea but not asked to contribute in any way.

“I would have liked to have been involved in that process. It does look interesting though.”

Some residents expressed their concern over the new advertising, which neglects to mention or picture Portland and is funded by BID levy payers, of which Weymouth and Portland Borough Council is a major contributor.

  •  THE advertising campaign will be formally unveiled to the public at the Best of Dorset show being held at Weymouth Pavilion on March 30.

'CLOSURES IMPACT US ALL'

MARY Reese of Ladybirds in St Alban Street said the closure of other shops has a negative impact on business.

“When every other shop is closed, it doesn’t do us any good whatsoever.

“If we could afford it, we would move into the main street. But we can’t afford it, so we stay here and then we’re waiting for the summer trade.”

Ms Reese added: “I think the individual shops are what we need here, and that’s what we’ve tried in this street.”

The clothes shop has been based in Weymouth for the past 15 years. Ms Reese said the shop didn’t benefit from the arrival of the Olympics.

“Everybody came for the sport. It was absolutely heaving. The volume of people was fantastic, but it didn’t do us any good whatsoever.”

A NUMBER OF PROJECTS TO HELP 

ALISON Theobald, co-chairman of the Weymouth Business Improvement District (BID), said they were looking at a number of projects to help the town.

Ms Theobald said: “A vibrant town would appeal to more people but equally there are always opportunities to be had with empty premises on every high street.

“When looking at client perception, the more shops that are full the better.

“But I think it’s also important to get the right shops.”

She added: “We’ve got a number of objectives within our business plan, but one of those is to help to improve the vibrancy, feel and experience of the town centre and obviously attract people to visit Weymouth as a destination.”

EMPTY SPACES 'CREATES NEGATIVE IMAGE'

GARY and Sue Seymour recently re-opened Mama’s Spaza Shop in the Colwell Centre on School Street.

The shop sells South African convenience food and has enjoyed a steady flow of South African and English customers.

The joint owners believe the centre’s empty units are creating a negative image.

Mr Seymour said: “That is the biggest thing: the image of the centre itself. People have got to try and get this image out of their head that this is a rubbish centre and that everything’s shut down.

“It is not at all. I would go the opposite and say it is one of the places that can really take off.”

Plans have been drawn up to open an indoor market on the centre’s upper level.

MP AIMS TO TACKLE HIGH BUSINESS RATES

RICHARD Drax, MP for South Dorset, said he recognised the problems high business rates presented but revealed that work was underway to tackle the issue.

“A lot is being done.

“A lot of pressure is being applied to try and meet the wishes of small businesses, not least in the shops of Weymouth and other towns across the country.

“Business rates have often come to my attention.

“It is raised frequently.”

Mr Drax added: “Ultimately, a business will survive – whether it’s any business, small or big – on whether it makes a profit.

“That’s why we have to think as a government, at a macro side, how to make that infrastructure a level playing field as far as we can so that small to medium sized business can grow.”

He added: “The local authority and the Chamber of Trade and others have got to ensure that the correct environment is created in the town so that local shops are encouraged to open and survive.”

Mr Seymour added: “The problem we’ve got is filling these units downstairs.”

Comments (66)

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6:50am Tue 11 Mar 14

catwoman2 says...

I avoid shopping in Weymouth due to the ridiculously high parking charges. I can park in Dorchester for two hours for just £1!
I avoid shopping in Weymouth due to the ridiculously high parking charges. I can park in Dorchester for two hours for just £1! catwoman2
  • Score: 81

7:36am Tue 11 Mar 14

arlbergbahn says...

usual complacency as you'd expect from W and P B C from Coun Munro-Price.
“It is a shame to see boarded up shops and restaurants. It’s a national problem in some ways. It seems as though we as consumers don’t shop in town centres in the way that we used to.”

Other towns (e.g, to name two not a milion miles from here, Dorchester and Bridport), seem to have found ways to get round what are certainly changing shopping habits, no doubt about that, by encouraging different kinds of shops from the usual dull old mainstream High Street chains, & encouraging different kinds of activity for people to come into town for (i.e., yes, I know some people sneer at them, coffee shops, restaurants & wine bars etc.) In other words, having some imagination rather than being stuck in the dull old rut that "there's nothing we can do" and "we're a traditional Bucket & Spade resort".
usual complacency as you'd expect from W and P B C from Coun Munro-Price. “It is a shame to see boarded up shops and restaurants. It’s a national problem in some ways. It seems as though we as consumers don’t shop in town centres in the way that we used to.” Other towns (e.g, to name two not a milion miles from here, Dorchester and Bridport), seem to have found ways to get round what are certainly changing shopping habits, no doubt about that, by encouraging different kinds of shops from the usual dull old mainstream High Street chains, & encouraging different kinds of activity for people to come into town for (i.e., yes, I know some people sneer at them, coffee shops, restaurants & wine bars etc.) In other words, having some imagination rather than being stuck in the dull old rut that "there's nothing we can do" and "we're a traditional Bucket & Spade resort". arlbergbahn
  • Score: 29

8:06am Tue 11 Mar 14

not too distant says...

Implement something.. Reduced ground rents/business rates for new local start-ups for the first 12 months. Increase availability and affordablility of market pitches as a stepping stone to "going legit" and getting a premises (remember Tom Singh anyone?).... Im sure our wise and powerful council can think of something during the morning/lunch-time/b
runch-time/afternoon
/early evening tea break....
Implement something.. Reduced ground rents/business rates for new local start-ups for the first 12 months. Increase availability and affordablility of market pitches as a stepping stone to "going legit" and getting a premises (remember Tom Singh anyone?).... Im sure our wise and powerful council can think of something during the morning/lunch-time/b runch-time/afternoon /early evening tea break.... not too distant
  • Score: 25

8:21am Tue 11 Mar 14

scubadude says...

catwoman2 wrote:
I avoid shopping in Weymouth due to the ridiculously high parking charges. I can park in Dorchester for two hours for just £1!
Plenty of places to park for free if you are clever or prepared for a very short walk 5-10min... but I agree, council are moronic not to make parking cheaper and give discount for Long stay.
It should be mandatory that they fill every shop with a business at any cost before April, they need to fight to reclaim the tourists the Olympics scared off.
[quote][p][bold]catwoman2[/bold] wrote: I avoid shopping in Weymouth due to the ridiculously high parking charges. I can park in Dorchester for two hours for just £1![/p][/quote]Plenty of places to park for free if you are clever or prepared for a very short walk 5-10min... but I agree, council are moronic not to make parking cheaper and give discount for Long stay. It should be mandatory that they fill every shop with a business at any cost before April, they need to fight to reclaim the tourists the Olympics scared off. scubadude
  • Score: 21

8:27am Tue 11 Mar 14

JackJohnson says...

In general parking is too expensive in most towns. Many people who go shopping will head to where the parking is cheaper (or free)

Better prices are available online. Why would I pay to go somewhere I'm forced to pay for parking, then pay higher prices for goods that I can find cheaper online.

Convenience. Why would I waste my time and money trecking to , and round, the shops when I can get it all done from the comfort of my own home far quicker, and a lot cheaper?

The town centre is dead or dying. Find businesses that are appropriate for town centre trading. Most 'traditional' town centre shops are no longer suitable for their locations. That, inevitably, leads to them closing. In the future town centres will shrink as shops on the outskirts close and they are changed back to residential use. That, in turn, will help to meet the housing shortage and also reduce town centre traffic.

Struggling to keep town centre shops open is not worthwhile. Better to encourage shops on the outskirts to relocate to the empty shops, then return their former premises to residential use, or demolish the former premises and build housing in its place.
In general parking is too expensive in most towns. Many people who go shopping will head to where the parking is cheaper (or free) Better prices are available online. Why would I pay to go somewhere I'm forced to pay for parking, then pay higher prices for goods that I can find cheaper online. Convenience. Why would I waste my time and money trecking to , and round, the shops when I can get it all done from the comfort of my own home far quicker, and a lot cheaper? The town centre is dead or dying. Find businesses that are appropriate for town centre trading. Most 'traditional' town centre shops are no longer suitable for their locations. That, inevitably, leads to them closing. In the future town centres will shrink as shops on the outskirts close and they are changed back to residential use. That, in turn, will help to meet the housing shortage and also reduce town centre traffic. Struggling to keep town centre shops open is not worthwhile. Better to encourage shops on the outskirts to relocate to the empty shops, then return their former premises to residential use, or demolish the former premises and build housing in its place. JackJohnson
  • Score: 16

8:45am Tue 11 Mar 14

satisfecho says...

And not just in Weymouth shops are closing.

Panasonic shop in Dorchester now gone.

Why, because the internet is grabbing the sales.

You could offer people to pay £5.00 to park, but if what they want to purchase is 20% cheaper online you know where they majority will spend their money.
And not just in Weymouth shops are closing. Panasonic shop in Dorchester now gone. Why, because the internet is grabbing the sales. You could offer people to pay £5.00 to park, but if what they want to purchase is 20% cheaper online you know where they majority will spend their money. satisfecho
  • Score: 19

8:52am Tue 11 Mar 14

Simon 1965 says...

No point blaiming the council or car parking charges, this is a UK wide trend, brought on by the move to out of town shopping centres and internet retailing.

Thankfully, and mainly due to the tourist trade, Weymouth retains a fairly vibrant town centre, it is actualy bucking the trend compared to the amount of empty shops in other areas.

If you don`t believe me, I can give you hundreds of examples, but lets start with Newport, South Wales.

Simon N.
No point blaiming the council or car parking charges, this is a UK wide trend, brought on by the move to out of town shopping centres and internet retailing. Thankfully, and mainly due to the tourist trade, Weymouth retains a fairly vibrant town centre, it is actualy bucking the trend compared to the amount of empty shops in other areas. If you don`t believe me, I can give you hundreds of examples, but lets start with Newport, South Wales. Simon N. Simon 1965
  • Score: 11

9:00am Tue 11 Mar 14

ronfogg says...

Perhaps there are too many shops. Why not turn some into residential properties.

It also needs to be remembered that W&P is a relatively poor part of Dorset and that the demographics work against it. We have a relatively rich elderly population (who are not big shoppers) supported by a relatively poor younger group (who don't have much money to spend). Well paid youngsters (who are the big spenders) are in short supply.

Parking is an issue, although spending £2-3 on petrol to shop in Dorchester seems to me to be a false saving. (15 miles return at £6 /gallon and 40mpg = £2.25)
Perhaps there are too many shops. Why not turn some into residential properties. It also needs to be remembered that W&P is a relatively poor part of Dorset and that the demographics work against it. We have a relatively rich elderly population (who are not big shoppers) supported by a relatively poor younger group (who don't have much money to spend). Well paid youngsters (who are the big spenders) are in short supply. Parking is an issue, although spending £2-3 on petrol to shop in Dorchester seems to me to be a false saving. (15 miles return at £6 /gallon and 40mpg = £2.25) ronfogg
  • Score: 8

9:21am Tue 11 Mar 14

PHonnor says...

Some really good sensible points raised in the posts above which the council would do well to take note of. As said above shopping habbits have changed which has lead to companies like NEXT leaving but having record online sales. In an ideal world those companies who currently dont trade in either St Marys or St Thomas street should be encouraged to move into empty spaces on those streets and the vacant properties, if viable be turned over to the residential letting market, I'm sure there are those who work in town but dont live there and would like to, this could reduce the amount of retail premises as the town does have too many and reduce the need to build on greenfield sites. In the meantime a corodinated approach from all parties should put a plan together, from the council, landlords to BID and come up with a plan of action.
Some really good sensible points raised in the posts above which the council would do well to take note of. As said above shopping habbits have changed which has lead to companies like NEXT leaving but having record online sales. In an ideal world those companies who currently dont trade in either St Marys or St Thomas street should be encouraged to move into empty spaces on those streets and the vacant properties, if viable be turned over to the residential letting market, I'm sure there are those who work in town but dont live there and would like to, this could reduce the amount of retail premises as the town does have too many and reduce the need to build on greenfield sites. In the meantime a corodinated approach from all parties should put a plan together, from the council, landlords to BID and come up with a plan of action. PHonnor
  • Score: 7

9:27am Tue 11 Mar 14

Mick16 says...

It's ok everyone. I saw a marketing strategy put forward by Weymouth BID which will turn Weymouht into the culture capital of the South. Weymouth has a beach. Market the beach properly and holidaymakers will come. Cut out the gimmicks about high class families, nide class families and focus on simply showcasing our award winning beach. In 4 years time the BID will not be voted back in and the Council will have to take the lead.
It's ok everyone. I saw a marketing strategy put forward by Weymouth BID which will turn Weymouht into the culture capital of the South. Weymouth has a beach. Market the beach properly and holidaymakers will come. Cut out the gimmicks about high class families, nide class families and focus on simply showcasing our award winning beach. In 4 years time the BID will not be voted back in and the Council will have to take the lead. Mick16
  • Score: 1

9:33am Tue 11 Mar 14

Parkstreetshufle says...

The old Next premises if for rent in St Marys street. £1350 per week rent. Im guessing but Id estimate that the business rates are at least half the rent, £700 pw, add electric and phone your looking at the fat end of £2,500 a week just to break even.
The council continue to raise rates. Whats the incentive to run a business in town. Its a dead end because infrastructure is not supporting business, its bleeding it dry.
Weymouth and Portland is controlled by those that have passed through the system and are not considering those that have yet to do so. Selfish and irresponsible. The entire council, local and county, needs to be gutted from the top floor, like an old building and hire fresh blood. Men and women that have an invested interest in creating a sustainable life in the area, not just a decade or so of reitrement.
The old Next premises if for rent in St Marys street. £1350 per week rent. Im guessing but Id estimate that the business rates are at least half the rent, £700 pw, add electric and phone your looking at the fat end of £2,500 a week just to break even. The council continue to raise rates. Whats the incentive to run a business in town. Its a dead end because infrastructure is not supporting business, its bleeding it dry. Weymouth and Portland is controlled by those that have passed through the system and are not considering those that have yet to do so. Selfish and irresponsible. The entire council, local and county, needs to be gutted from the top floor, like an old building and hire fresh blood. Men and women that have an invested interest in creating a sustainable life in the area, not just a decade or so of reitrement. Parkstreetshufle
  • Score: 26

9:46am Tue 11 Mar 14

melcombe boy says...

not too distant wrote:
Implement something.. Reduced ground rents/business rates for new local start-ups for the first 12 months. Increase availability and affordablility of market pitches as a stepping stone to "going legit" and getting a premises (remember Tom Singh anyone?).... Im sure our wise and powerful council can think of something during the morning/lunch-time/b

runch-time/afternoon

/early evening tea break....
The council don't have the power to reduce shop rents. That is down to the greedy private sector demanding too much rent. Business rates are dictated by central government and not the local council. Even if the council had the power to implement change there is no money available to do anything because of savage budget cuts again dictated by central government.
We live in a capitalist world. This is what happens when there is a recession.
Maybe it is time to start shifting away from greed dominated capitalism!
[quote][p][bold]not too distant[/bold] wrote: Implement something.. Reduced ground rents/business rates for new local start-ups for the first 12 months. Increase availability and affordablility of market pitches as a stepping stone to "going legit" and getting a premises (remember Tom Singh anyone?).... Im sure our wise and powerful council can think of something during the morning/lunch-time/b runch-time/afternoon /early evening tea break....[/p][/quote]The council don't have the power to reduce shop rents. That is down to the greedy private sector demanding too much rent. Business rates are dictated by central government and not the local council. Even if the council had the power to implement change there is no money available to do anything because of savage budget cuts again dictated by central government. We live in a capitalist world. This is what happens when there is a recession. Maybe it is time to start shifting away from greed dominated capitalism! melcombe boy
  • Score: 9

9:47am Tue 11 Mar 14

MrTomSmith says...

Mick16 wrote:
It's ok everyone. I saw a marketing strategy put forward by Weymouth BID which will turn Weymouht into the culture capital of the South. Weymouth has a beach. Market the beach properly and holidaymakers will come. Cut out the gimmicks about high class families, nide class families and focus on simply showcasing our award winning beach. In 4 years time the BID will not be voted back in and the Council will have to take the lead.
100% Agree Mick16. What Weymouth needs is wet weather attractions. Weymouth is packed in good weather it doesn't any marketing. But when the rain comes there is not so much to do. We have to look after our market. Our Market is young families, so we should provide facilities for them. That's where the 100k could go, not on a useless campaign aimed at the wrong market.
[quote][p][bold]Mick16[/bold] wrote: It's ok everyone. I saw a marketing strategy put forward by Weymouth BID which will turn Weymouht into the culture capital of the South. Weymouth has a beach. Market the beach properly and holidaymakers will come. Cut out the gimmicks about high class families, nide class families and focus on simply showcasing our award winning beach. In 4 years time the BID will not be voted back in and the Council will have to take the lead.[/p][/quote]100% Agree Mick16. What Weymouth needs is wet weather attractions. Weymouth is packed in good weather it doesn't any marketing. But when the rain comes there is not so much to do. We have to look after our market. Our Market is young families, so we should provide facilities for them. That's where the 100k could go, not on a useless campaign aimed at the wrong market. MrTomSmith
  • Score: 14

9:50am Tue 11 Mar 14

MrTomSmith says...

Pop Up Shops is the Answer, Rent £10 a week for 16 weeks. Lets go.
Pop Up Shops is the Answer, Rent £10 a week for 16 weeks. Lets go. MrTomSmith
  • Score: 14

9:51am Tue 11 Mar 14

chesil beach says...

Weymouth Ripoff Weymouth it should be named , Went to yeovil last thursday cost £1.60 for 3 hrs parking better shops AND police on patrol in town centre NO tramps NO beggers NO beggers disguised as buskers , and there were council street cleaners picking up litter , the town centre was clean and buzzing, Sooner weymouth close down the better,
Weymouth Ripoff Weymouth it should be named , Went to yeovil last thursday cost £1.60 for 3 hrs parking better shops AND police on patrol in town centre NO tramps NO beggers NO beggers disguised as buskers , and there were council street cleaners picking up litter , the town centre was clean and buzzing, Sooner weymouth close down the better, chesil beach
  • Score: -2

10:03am Tue 11 Mar 14

Dorset stuff says...

If I wanted to go shopping, it would not be to Weymouth. There is a Debenhams and . . . . . . . . a load of other shops you can find in any other town. Weymouth needs a USP, something to draw in the shoppers. Dorchester is a bit better but if I really want to go somewhere with more choice then it's off to Bournemouth.
If I wanted to go shopping, it would not be to Weymouth. There is a Debenhams and . . . . . . . . a load of other shops you can find in any other town. Weymouth needs a USP, something to draw in the shoppers. Dorchester is a bit better but if I really want to go somewhere with more choice then it's off to Bournemouth. Dorset stuff
  • Score: 8

11:01am Tue 11 Mar 14

Redmic99 says...

scubadude wrote:
catwoman2 wrote:
I avoid shopping in Weymouth due to the ridiculously high parking charges. I can park in Dorchester for two hours for just £1!
Plenty of places to park for free if you are clever or prepared for a very short walk 5-10min... but I agree, council are moronic not to make parking cheaper and give discount for Long stay.
It should be mandatory that they fill every shop with a business at any cost before April, they need to fight to reclaim the tourists the Olympics scared off.
I wouldn't say there are plenty within a 5 minute walk....I often try parking up the Nothe and there are rarely any spaces.....
[quote][p][bold]scubadude[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]catwoman2[/bold] wrote: I avoid shopping in Weymouth due to the ridiculously high parking charges. I can park in Dorchester for two hours for just £1![/p][/quote]Plenty of places to park for free if you are clever or prepared for a very short walk 5-10min... but I agree, council are moronic not to make parking cheaper and give discount for Long stay. It should be mandatory that they fill every shop with a business at any cost before April, they need to fight to reclaim the tourists the Olympics scared off.[/p][/quote]I wouldn't say there are plenty within a 5 minute walk....I often try parking up the Nothe and there are rarely any spaces..... Redmic99
  • Score: 3

11:22am Tue 11 Mar 14

Simon 1965 says...

The Park & Ride at Weymouth remains excellent value, especially outside of the tourist season.

Simon N.
The Park & Ride at Weymouth remains excellent value, especially outside of the tourist season. Simon N. Simon 1965
  • Score: 9

11:44am Tue 11 Mar 14

Get a grip says...

Parkstreetshufle wrote:
The old Next premises if for rent in St Marys street. £1350 per week rent. Im guessing but Id estimate that the business rates are at least half the rent, £700 pw, add electric and phone your looking at the fat end of £2,500 a week just to break even. The council continue to raise rates. Whats the incentive to run a business in town. Its a dead end because infrastructure is not supporting business, its bleeding it dry. Weymouth and Portland is controlled by those that have passed through the system and are not considering those that have yet to do so. Selfish and irresponsible. The entire council, local and county, needs to be gutted from the top floor, like an old building and hire fresh blood. Men and women that have an invested interest in creating a sustainable life in the area, not just a decade or so of reitrement.
You must understand that the council do not own the shops and have no control over the rents.

Business rates are not fixed by the council.
[quote][p][bold]Parkstreetshufle[/bold] wrote: The old Next premises if for rent in St Marys street. £1350 per week rent. Im guessing but Id estimate that the business rates are at least half the rent, £700 pw, add electric and phone your looking at the fat end of £2,500 a week just to break even. The council continue to raise rates. Whats the incentive to run a business in town. Its a dead end because infrastructure is not supporting business, its bleeding it dry. Weymouth and Portland is controlled by those that have passed through the system and are not considering those that have yet to do so. Selfish and irresponsible. The entire council, local and county, needs to be gutted from the top floor, like an old building and hire fresh blood. Men and women that have an invested interest in creating a sustainable life in the area, not just a decade or so of reitrement.[/p][/quote]You must understand that the council do not own the shops and have no control over the rents. Business rates are not fixed by the council. Get a grip
  • Score: 14

12:42pm Tue 11 Mar 14

K9 says...

As ronfogg said, there's too many retail units. We simply don't need that many for the population. The summer influx or tourists gives all the cafes and kiss-me-quick-hat shops trade but that then has to last them through the lean off-season. Old town centres need to catch up with how they are going to handle declining demand for the high street, and that probably means more conversions to domestic housing, with the accompanying drop in business rate revenues for the council.
As ronfogg said, there's too many retail units. We simply don't need that many for the population. The summer influx or tourists gives all the cafes and kiss-me-quick-hat shops trade but that then has to last them through the lean off-season. Old town centres need to catch up with how they are going to handle declining demand for the high street, and that probably means more conversions to domestic housing, with the accompanying drop in business rate revenues for the council. K9
  • Score: 5

12:57pm Tue 11 Mar 14

Dorsetdumpling says...

Calm Down dears!

I'm sure the Olympic legacy will kick in any moment now....
Calm Down dears! I'm sure the Olympic legacy will kick in any moment now.... Dorsetdumpling
  • Score: 5

1:03pm Tue 11 Mar 14

elloello1980 says...

chesil beach wrote:
Weymouth Ripoff Weymouth it should be named , Went to yeovil last thursday cost £1.60 for 3 hrs parking better shops AND police on patrol in town centre NO tramps NO beggers NO beggers disguised as buskers , and there were council street cleaners picking up litter , the town centre was clean and buzzing, Sooner weymouth close down the better,
oh, Yeovil. what a lovely town... said no one!
[quote][p][bold]chesil beach[/bold] wrote: Weymouth Ripoff Weymouth it should be named , Went to yeovil last thursday cost £1.60 for 3 hrs parking better shops AND police on patrol in town centre NO tramps NO beggers NO beggers disguised as buskers , and there were council street cleaners picking up litter , the town centre was clean and buzzing, Sooner weymouth close down the better,[/p][/quote]oh, Yeovil. what a lovely town... said no one! elloello1980
  • Score: 24

1:04pm Tue 11 Mar 14

arlbergbahn says...

Mick16 wrote:
It's ok everyone. I saw a marketing strategy put forward by Weymouth BID which will turn Weymouht into the culture capital of the South. Weymouth has a beach. Market the beach properly and holidaymakers will come. Cut out the gimmicks about high class families, nide class families and focus on simply showcasing our award winning beach. In 4 years time the BID will not be voted back in and the Council will have to take the lead.
The bucket 'n' spade day trip tourist market won't do a thing for town centre shops, will it. They won't be likely to do any shopping while they're there, apart perhaps from an ice cream and fish and Chips from a beach kiosk. That'll make no difference to the great majority of shops. And what about out of season?
[quote][p][bold]Mick16[/bold] wrote: It's ok everyone. I saw a marketing strategy put forward by Weymouth BID which will turn Weymouht into the culture capital of the South. Weymouth has a beach. Market the beach properly and holidaymakers will come. Cut out the gimmicks about high class families, nide class families and focus on simply showcasing our award winning beach. In 4 years time the BID will not be voted back in and the Council will have to take the lead.[/p][/quote]The bucket 'n' spade day trip tourist market won't do a thing for town centre shops, will it. They won't be likely to do any shopping while they're there, apart perhaps from an ice cream and fish and Chips from a beach kiosk. That'll make no difference to the great majority of shops. And what about out of season? arlbergbahn
  • Score: 3

1:21pm Tue 11 Mar 14

Parkstreetshufle says...

Get a grip wrote:
Parkstreetshufle wrote:
The old Next premises if for rent in St Marys street. £1350 per week rent. Im guessing but Id estimate that the business rates are at least half the rent, £700 pw, add electric and phone your looking at the fat end of £2,500 a week just to break even. The council continue to raise rates. Whats the incentive to run a business in town. Its a dead end because infrastructure is not supporting business, its bleeding it dry. Weymouth and Portland is controlled by those that have passed through the system and are not considering those that have yet to do so. Selfish and irresponsible. The entire council, local and county, needs to be gutted from the top floor, like an old building and hire fresh blood. Men and women that have an invested interest in creating a sustainable life in the area, not just a decade or so of reitrement.
You must understand that the council do not own the shops and have no control over the rents.

Business rates are not fixed by the council.
Of course a realise that - where have I said that the council set rent?
Perhaps you would be better to read a response before rushing to point out mistakes. Being a pedant is the new trolling, slightly less offensive, but ultimately pointless and unrewarding for either poster or pedant. Keep your hands in your pockets...

Of the consortium owned property in town, the council will certainly advise the owners of the rent level, either directly or through others. The council collect the rates, you can bet your bottom euro they set the rates, they might be covered by government legislation but trying to suggest that the council are just government automatons is ridiculous. The council, just like every other government institution are a collection of people all using the rules to suit, its not a matter of if they do this - just to what extent and who that benefits.
Again I come back to my point, at some stage we will need to address the dwindling number of young people and young families. The mentality is to keep Weymouth as a picture postcard. This mentality is killing it. Soon it will be a ghost town like something from Wales. Nobody says you have to forget the past - but you have to embrace the future, and that is not allowing a council composed of very conservative much older people make all the decisions.
[quote][p][bold]Get a grip[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Parkstreetshufle[/bold] wrote: The old Next premises if for rent in St Marys street. £1350 per week rent. Im guessing but Id estimate that the business rates are at least half the rent, £700 pw, add electric and phone your looking at the fat end of £2,500 a week just to break even. The council continue to raise rates. Whats the incentive to run a business in town. Its a dead end because infrastructure is not supporting business, its bleeding it dry. Weymouth and Portland is controlled by those that have passed through the system and are not considering those that have yet to do so. Selfish and irresponsible. The entire council, local and county, needs to be gutted from the top floor, like an old building and hire fresh blood. Men and women that have an invested interest in creating a sustainable life in the area, not just a decade or so of reitrement.[/p][/quote]You must understand that the council do not own the shops and have no control over the rents. Business rates are not fixed by the council.[/p][/quote]Of course a realise that - where have I said that the council set rent? Perhaps you would be better to read a response before rushing to point out mistakes. Being a pedant is the new trolling, slightly less offensive, but ultimately pointless and unrewarding for either poster or pedant. Keep your hands in your pockets... Of the consortium owned property in town, the council will certainly advise the owners of the rent level, either directly or through others. The council collect the rates, you can bet your bottom euro they set the rates, they might be covered by government legislation but trying to suggest that the council are just government automatons is ridiculous. The council, just like every other government institution are a collection of people all using the rules to suit, its not a matter of if they do this - just to what extent and who that benefits. Again I come back to my point, at some stage we will need to address the dwindling number of young people and young families. The mentality is to keep Weymouth as a picture postcard. This mentality is killing it. Soon it will be a ghost town like something from Wales. Nobody says you have to forget the past - but you have to embrace the future, and that is not allowing a council composed of very conservative much older people make all the decisions. Parkstreetshufle
  • Score: -6

1:47pm Tue 11 Mar 14

wowfood says...

Personally I'd argue that what we need is a larger array of indoor entertainment and eat out places. Dorch has gotten wagamamas, nando, zizis etc, what do we have? A bella pasta and a couple McDs / subways. If a family comes down here on holiday there really aren't that many great places in town for them to eat, aside from getting fish and chips that is. Likewise for locals. If I want to go for a meal with friends / family we wind up in dorch because it's not bella pasta.

Likewise indoor entertainment. We have a load of arcades on the seafront with the same machines they had in there 20 years back. That's about it. Would be nice to have somewhere in town with a kids zone, for younger kids who come here and get rained out. They could probably make one out of the skeleton of the colwell center.

Would also be nice if the weymouth pavillion hired a decent advertiser. I'll ocasionally here wind of something I find interesting through the grapevine, but unless I'm looking I never know what they have there. I know more about what's happening at the Bic than the pavillion so it's no wonder it died and then came back only to risk death a second time.
Personally I'd argue that what we need is a larger array of indoor entertainment and eat out places. Dorch has gotten wagamamas, nando, zizis etc, what do we have? A bella pasta and a couple McDs / subways. If a family comes down here on holiday there really aren't that many great places in town for them to eat, aside from getting fish and chips that is. Likewise for locals. If I want to go for a meal with friends / family we wind up in dorch because it's not bella pasta. Likewise indoor entertainment. We have a load of arcades on the seafront with the same machines they had in there 20 years back. That's about it. Would be nice to have somewhere in town with a kids zone, for younger kids who come here and get rained out. They could probably make one out of the skeleton of the colwell center. Would also be nice if the weymouth pavillion hired a decent advertiser. I'll ocasionally here wind of something I find interesting through the grapevine, but unless I'm looking I never know what they have there. I know more about what's happening at the Bic than the pavillion so it's no wonder it died and then came back only to risk death a second time. wowfood
  • Score: 7

2:01pm Tue 11 Mar 14

2Sunny says...

catwoman2 wrote:
I avoid shopping in Weymouth due to the ridiculously high parking charges. I can park in Dorchester for two hours for just £1!
Ditto. I've just purchased a West Dorset Shopper's Permit entitling me to 2 hours free parking each day, valid for 6 months for just £16! Weymouth really need to follow suit. I'd also like to add how easy it was to purchase the pass at the Tourist Information Office situated conveniently in the town centre...perhaps Weymouth could follow suit again and relocate their TIC to the town centre. That would be one out of the 27 empty town premises occupied. It would also bring TIC customers into the town centre.
[quote][p][bold]catwoman2[/bold] wrote: I avoid shopping in Weymouth due to the ridiculously high parking charges. I can park in Dorchester for two hours for just £1![/p][/quote]Ditto. I've just purchased a West Dorset Shopper's Permit entitling me to 2 hours free parking each day, valid for 6 months for just £16! Weymouth really need to follow suit. I'd also like to add how easy it was to purchase the pass at the Tourist Information Office situated conveniently in the town centre...perhaps Weymouth could follow suit again and relocate their TIC to the town centre. That would be one out of the 27 empty town premises occupied. It would also bring TIC customers into the town centre. 2Sunny
  • Score: 8

2:23pm Tue 11 Mar 14

Sean1991 says...

wowfood wrote:
Personally I'd argue that what we need is a larger array of indoor entertainment and eat out places. Dorch has gotten wagamamas, nando, zizis etc, what do we have? A bella pasta and a couple McDs / subways. If a family comes down here on holiday there really aren't that many great places in town for them to eat, aside from getting fish and chips that is. Likewise for locals. If I want to go for a meal with friends / family we wind up in dorch because it's not bella pasta.

Likewise indoor entertainment. We have a load of arcades on the seafront with the same machines they had in there 20 years back. That's about it. Would be nice to have somewhere in town with a kids zone, for younger kids who come here and get rained out. They could probably make one out of the skeleton of the colwell center.

Would also be nice if the weymouth pavillion hired a decent advertiser. I'll ocasionally here wind of something I find interesting through the grapevine, but unless I'm looking I never know what they have there. I know more about what's happening at the Bic than the pavillion so it's no wonder it died and then came back only to risk death a second time.
The advertising at the Pavilion is shocking! Not a single poster anywhere apart from the ones inside The Pavilion. No wonder most of the shows don't sell very well, no one knows what's on! I check the website every 2-3 days.
[quote][p][bold]wowfood[/bold] wrote: Personally I'd argue that what we need is a larger array of indoor entertainment and eat out places. Dorch has gotten wagamamas, nando, zizis etc, what do we have? A bella pasta and a couple McDs / subways. If a family comes down here on holiday there really aren't that many great places in town for them to eat, aside from getting fish and chips that is. Likewise for locals. If I want to go for a meal with friends / family we wind up in dorch because it's not bella pasta. Likewise indoor entertainment. We have a load of arcades on the seafront with the same machines they had in there 20 years back. That's about it. Would be nice to have somewhere in town with a kids zone, for younger kids who come here and get rained out. They could probably make one out of the skeleton of the colwell center. Would also be nice if the weymouth pavillion hired a decent advertiser. I'll ocasionally here wind of something I find interesting through the grapevine, but unless I'm looking I never know what they have there. I know more about what's happening at the Bic than the pavillion so it's no wonder it died and then came back only to risk death a second time.[/p][/quote]The advertising at the Pavilion is shocking! Not a single poster anywhere apart from the ones inside The Pavilion. No wonder most of the shows don't sell very well, no one knows what's on! I check the website every 2-3 days. Sean1991
  • Score: 2

2:41pm Tue 11 Mar 14

Simon 1965 says...

Dear arlbergbahn,

I am probably what you consider a "bucket and spade" tourist, and I can assure you that I (along wth many of my friends that also visit Weymouth on a regular basis) DO spent a samll forturne in the retail area - the town is very lucky in that regard that the shops are directly situated next to the beach and harbour.

Simon N.
Dear arlbergbahn, I am probably what you consider a "bucket and spade" tourist, and I can assure you that I (along wth many of my friends that also visit Weymouth on a regular basis) DO spent a samll forturne in the retail area - the town is very lucky in that regard that the shops are directly situated next to the beach and harbour. Simon N. Simon 1965
  • Score: 5

2:42pm Tue 11 Mar 14

PHonnor says...

With the local council elections round the corner isnt this a good time for those prospective candidates to outline thier plans to regenerate the town or are they sitting on thier hands knowing they will get elected anyway?
With the local council elections round the corner isnt this a good time for those prospective candidates to outline thier plans to regenerate the town or are they sitting on thier hands knowing they will get elected anyway? PHonnor
  • Score: 9

3:11pm Tue 11 Mar 14

siriem says...

wowfood wrote:
Personally I'd argue that what we need is a larger array of indoor entertainment and eat out places. Dorch has gotten wagamamas, nando, zizis etc, what do we have? A bella pasta and a couple McDs / subways. If a family comes down here on holiday there really aren't that many great places in town for them to eat, aside from getting fish and chips that is. Likewise for locals. If I want to go for a meal with friends / family we wind up in dorch because it's not bella pasta.

Likewise indoor entertainment. We have a load of arcades on the seafront with the same machines they had in there 20 years back. That's about it. Would be nice to have somewhere in town with a kids zone, for younger kids who come here and get rained out. They could probably make one out of the skeleton of the colwell center.

Would also be nice if the weymouth pavillion hired a decent advertiser. I'll ocasionally here wind of something I find interesting through the grapevine, but unless I'm looking I never know what they have there. I know more about what's happening at the Bic than the pavillion so it's no wonder it died and then came back only to risk death a second time.
There are loads of amazing places to eat and drink in Weymouth and I would hate to see any incursion by the microwave jockeys of the high street chains. Il Porto, The Red Lion, Monkey's Fist, Ocean Bistro, Mallams, The Ship, The George Bar & Grill, Vaughn's, Flood 's, Sense, Manbo's, The Dining Room, Enzo's and The Dorset Burger Co are just a few of the fine eating places in Weymouth, not to mention the many excellent fish & chip shops, tea rooms and cafés. In fact the town is spoilt for choice and quality. And you want Nando's? The fact that Flamin' Chooks - a Nando's clone - didn't survive, shows that you're definitely in a minority.
[quote][p][bold]wowfood[/bold] wrote: Personally I'd argue that what we need is a larger array of indoor entertainment and eat out places. Dorch has gotten wagamamas, nando, zizis etc, what do we have? A bella pasta and a couple McDs / subways. If a family comes down here on holiday there really aren't that many great places in town for them to eat, aside from getting fish and chips that is. Likewise for locals. If I want to go for a meal with friends / family we wind up in dorch because it's not bella pasta. Likewise indoor entertainment. We have a load of arcades on the seafront with the same machines they had in there 20 years back. That's about it. Would be nice to have somewhere in town with a kids zone, for younger kids who come here and get rained out. They could probably make one out of the skeleton of the colwell center. Would also be nice if the weymouth pavillion hired a decent advertiser. I'll ocasionally here wind of something I find interesting through the grapevine, but unless I'm looking I never know what they have there. I know more about what's happening at the Bic than the pavillion so it's no wonder it died and then came back only to risk death a second time.[/p][/quote]There are loads of amazing places to eat and drink in Weymouth and I would hate to see any incursion by the microwave jockeys of the high street chains. Il Porto, The Red Lion, Monkey's Fist, Ocean Bistro, Mallams, The Ship, The George Bar & Grill, Vaughn's, Flood 's, Sense, Manbo's, The Dining Room, Enzo's and The Dorset Burger Co are just a few of the fine eating places in Weymouth, not to mention the many excellent fish & chip shops, tea rooms and cafés. In fact the town is spoilt for choice and quality. And you want Nando's? The fact that Flamin' Chooks - a Nando's clone - didn't survive, shows that you're definitely in a minority. siriem
  • Score: 15

3:19pm Tue 11 Mar 14

siriem says...

wowfood wrote:
Personally I'd argue that what we need is a larger array of indoor entertainment and eat out places. Dorch has gotten wagamamas, nando, zizis etc, what do we have? A bella pasta and a couple McDs / subways. If a family comes down here on holiday there really aren't that many great places in town for them to eat, aside from getting fish and chips that is. Likewise for locals. If I want to go for a meal with friends / family we wind up in dorch because it's not bella pasta.

Likewise indoor entertainment. We have a load of arcades on the seafront with the same machines they had in there 20 years back. That's about it. Would be nice to have somewhere in town with a kids zone, for younger kids who come here and get rained out. They could probably make one out of the skeleton of the colwell center.

Would also be nice if the weymouth pavillion hired a decent advertiser. I'll ocasionally here wind of something I find interesting through the grapevine, but unless I'm looking I never know what they have there. I know more about what's happening at the Bic than the pavillion so it's no wonder it died and then came back only to risk death a second time.
Would absolutely have to agree about he Pavilion though. Still advertising last year's panto when there is an Easter panto coming that I bet hardly anyone knows about. And what's with all the shows dedicated to people pretending to be other people? Instead of tribute acts, why can't we have some real theatre?
[quote][p][bold]wowfood[/bold] wrote: Personally I'd argue that what we need is a larger array of indoor entertainment and eat out places. Dorch has gotten wagamamas, nando, zizis etc, what do we have? A bella pasta and a couple McDs / subways. If a family comes down here on holiday there really aren't that many great places in town for them to eat, aside from getting fish and chips that is. Likewise for locals. If I want to go for a meal with friends / family we wind up in dorch because it's not bella pasta. Likewise indoor entertainment. We have a load of arcades on the seafront with the same machines they had in there 20 years back. That's about it. Would be nice to have somewhere in town with a kids zone, for younger kids who come here and get rained out. They could probably make one out of the skeleton of the colwell center. Would also be nice if the weymouth pavillion hired a decent advertiser. I'll ocasionally here wind of something I find interesting through the grapevine, but unless I'm looking I never know what they have there. I know more about what's happening at the Bic than the pavillion so it's no wonder it died and then came back only to risk death a second time.[/p][/quote]Would absolutely have to agree about he Pavilion though. Still advertising last year's panto when there is an Easter panto coming that I bet hardly anyone knows about. And what's with all the shows dedicated to people pretending to be other people? Instead of tribute acts, why can't we have some real theatre? siriem
  • Score: 5

3:26pm Tue 11 Mar 14

jennywimpy says...

Anyone moaning about empty Weymouth should have been in town on Sunday ,beach fairly packed with families , esplanade lots of people out for a Sunday stroll, and yes town centre packed with strollers, shoppers ,and lots of people having food and drink and enjoying what we have to offer down here so stop whingeing and look on the positive side.
On another note rates are set by government, collected by council and then go to government, to be put in there central pot, please do try to get facts right.
Anyone moaning about empty Weymouth should have been in town on Sunday ,beach fairly packed with families , esplanade lots of people out for a Sunday stroll, and yes town centre packed with strollers, shoppers ,and lots of people having food and drink and enjoying what we have to offer down here so stop whingeing and look on the positive side. On another note rates are set by government, collected by council and then go to government, to be put in there central pot, please do try to get facts right. jennywimpy
  • Score: 4

4:11pm Tue 11 Mar 14

annotater says...

jennywimpy wrote:
Anyone moaning about empty Weymouth should have been in town on Sunday ,beach fairly packed with families , esplanade lots of people out for a Sunday stroll, and yes town centre packed with strollers, shoppers ,and lots of people having food and drink and enjoying what we have to offer down here so stop whingeing and look on the positive side.
On another note rates are set by government, collected by council and then go to government, to be put in there central pot, please do try to get facts right.
Unfortunately, NO SHOPS!
[quote][p][bold]jennywimpy[/bold] wrote: Anyone moaning about empty Weymouth should have been in town on Sunday ,beach fairly packed with families , esplanade lots of people out for a Sunday stroll, and yes town centre packed with strollers, shoppers ,and lots of people having food and drink and enjoying what we have to offer down here so stop whingeing and look on the positive side. On another note rates are set by government, collected by council and then go to government, to be put in there central pot, please do try to get facts right.[/p][/quote]Unfortunately, NO SHOPS! annotater
  • Score: 3

4:22pm Tue 11 Mar 14

carlinste says...

Here in my part of Wyke Regis we only have two buses into town and only two back, yes aren't we lucky!! I do not drive and getting on in years, I find the new positions of the bus stops especially to and from Asda , when you are carrying shopping is a no-no. I wish I was in a position to move nearer the town, but then again, a new obstacle would probably be put in place to impede me! This is the reason I rarely venture into town.
Here in my part of Wyke Regis we only have two buses into town and only two back, yes aren't we lucky!! I do not drive and getting on in years, I find the new positions of the bus stops especially to and from Asda , when you are carrying shopping is a no-no. I wish I was in a position to move nearer the town, but then again, a new obstacle would probably be put in place to impede me! This is the reason I rarely venture into town. carlinste
  • Score: 4

4:28pm Tue 11 Mar 14

Get a grip says...

Parkstreetshufle wrote:
Get a grip wrote:
Parkstreetshufle wrote:
The old Next premises if for rent in St Marys street. £1350 per week rent. Im guessing but Id estimate that the business rates are at least half the rent, £700 pw, add electric and phone your looking at the fat end of £2,500 a week just to break even. The council continue to raise rates. Whats the incentive to run a business in town. Its a dead end because infrastructure is not supporting business, its bleeding it dry. Weymouth and Portland is controlled by those that have passed through the system and are not considering those that have yet to do so. Selfish and irresponsible. The entire council, local and county, needs to be gutted from the top floor, like an old building and hire fresh blood. Men and women that have an invested interest in creating a sustainable life in the area, not just a decade or so of reitrement.
You must understand that the council do not own the shops and have no control over the rents.

Business rates are not fixed by the council.
Of course a realise that - where have I said that the council set rent?
Perhaps you would be better to read a response before rushing to point out mistakes. Being a pedant is the new trolling, slightly less offensive, but ultimately pointless and unrewarding for either poster or pedant. Keep your hands in your pockets...

Of the consortium owned property in town, the council will certainly advise the owners of the rent level, either directly or through others. The council collect the rates, you can bet your bottom euro they set the rates, they might be covered by government legislation but trying to suggest that the council are just government automatons is ridiculous. The council, just like every other government institution are a collection of people all using the rules to suit, its not a matter of if they do this - just to what extent and who that benefits.
Again I come back to my point, at some stage we will need to address the dwindling number of young people and young families. The mentality is to keep Weymouth as a picture postcard. This mentality is killing it. Soon it will be a ghost town like something from Wales. Nobody says you have to forget the past - but you have to embrace the future, and that is not allowing a council composed of very conservative much older people make all the decisions.
Your comments only show to me that you simply do not understand the whole issues of how rent and rates are calculated.
[quote][p][bold]Parkstreetshufle[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Get a grip[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Parkstreetshufle[/bold] wrote: The old Next premises if for rent in St Marys street. £1350 per week rent. Im guessing but Id estimate that the business rates are at least half the rent, £700 pw, add electric and phone your looking at the fat end of £2,500 a week just to break even. The council continue to raise rates. Whats the incentive to run a business in town. Its a dead end because infrastructure is not supporting business, its bleeding it dry. Weymouth and Portland is controlled by those that have passed through the system and are not considering those that have yet to do so. Selfish and irresponsible. The entire council, local and county, needs to be gutted from the top floor, like an old building and hire fresh blood. Men and women that have an invested interest in creating a sustainable life in the area, not just a decade or so of reitrement.[/p][/quote]You must understand that the council do not own the shops and have no control over the rents. Business rates are not fixed by the council.[/p][/quote]Of course a realise that - where have I said that the council set rent? Perhaps you would be better to read a response before rushing to point out mistakes. Being a pedant is the new trolling, slightly less offensive, but ultimately pointless and unrewarding for either poster or pedant. Keep your hands in your pockets... Of the consortium owned property in town, the council will certainly advise the owners of the rent level, either directly or through others. The council collect the rates, you can bet your bottom euro they set the rates, they might be covered by government legislation but trying to suggest that the council are just government automatons is ridiculous. The council, just like every other government institution are a collection of people all using the rules to suit, its not a matter of if they do this - just to what extent and who that benefits. Again I come back to my point, at some stage we will need to address the dwindling number of young people and young families. The mentality is to keep Weymouth as a picture postcard. This mentality is killing it. Soon it will be a ghost town like something from Wales. Nobody says you have to forget the past - but you have to embrace the future, and that is not allowing a council composed of very conservative much older people make all the decisions.[/p][/quote]Your comments only show to me that you simply do not understand the whole issues of how rent and rates are calculated. Get a grip
  • Score: 4

4:44pm Tue 11 Mar 14

MrTomSmith says...

The problem is we have two seasons, the Summer when it is very busy, and the Winter when it is very quiet. How in this day and age can businesses work around that is almost impossible.

There is no real correct answer. I can't see how, with such a massive difference in numbers Weymouth can expect much more of a town centre than it has now.

Online shopping is stopping the major retailers, its the small retailers we need to encourage. Now the next question is, will the bucket and spade mob (and I have nothing against them at all) actually buy from small retailers?

I can't see much change ahead to be honest I think Weymouth is doing quite well.

The advertising of events at the Pavilion is fine online, but it could be better in town, however that is very expensive to do and The ever changing line up would mean a flyer would be out of date in 2 or 3 weeks. Can't see how they can improve without a massive outlay on posters and people to put them out.

I am not sure what people expect, we have a brilliant beach, great harbour, super restaurants and stacks of pubs, but admittedly shops are weak, so lets get these empty shops filled up. Give them away, it doesn't matter. Just don't stick dam posters in them!

I love the town myself. Not sure what all the fuss is about.
The problem is we have two seasons, the Summer when it is very busy, and the Winter when it is very quiet. How in this day and age can businesses work around that is almost impossible. There is no real correct answer. I can't see how, with such a massive difference in numbers Weymouth can expect much more of a town centre than it has now. Online shopping is stopping the major retailers, its the small retailers we need to encourage. Now the next question is, will the bucket and spade mob (and I have nothing against them at all) actually buy from small retailers? I can't see much change ahead to be honest I think Weymouth is doing quite well. The advertising of events at the Pavilion is fine online, but it could be better in town, however that is very expensive to do and The ever changing line up would mean a flyer would be out of date in 2 or 3 weeks. Can't see how they can improve without a massive outlay on posters and people to put them out. I am not sure what people expect, we have a brilliant beach, great harbour, super restaurants and stacks of pubs, but admittedly shops are weak, so lets get these empty shops filled up. Give them away, it doesn't matter. Just don't stick dam posters in them! I love the town myself. Not sure what all the fuss is about. MrTomSmith
  • Score: 7

4:45pm Tue 11 Mar 14

Under35andout says...

the council are stupid , they made this town like it is , expect high biz rates with hardly no income + , buy into weymouth watch the council suck you dry , wait till winter you will fail ,. sure buy now while its summer when winter comes you all gonna be sucked dry , no hmo licences for anyone , lose your morgages , your hotels and shops to the bloodsuckers at the council anyone in the right mind would sell up and leave this Flea invested town run by a corrupt council , look at all them faces in the paper , who do you trust ?>?? mt friend lost his house , his hotel and his life to these bloodsuckers
the council are stupid , they made this town like it is , expect high biz rates with hardly no income + , buy into weymouth watch the council suck you dry , wait till winter you will fail ,. sure buy now while its summer when winter comes you all gonna be sucked dry , no hmo licences for anyone , lose your morgages , your hotels and shops to the bloodsuckers at the council anyone in the right mind would sell up and leave this Flea invested town run by a corrupt council , look at all them faces in the paper , who do you trust ?>?? mt friend lost his house , his hotel and his life to these bloodsuckers Under35andout
  • Score: -9

5:00pm Tue 11 Mar 14

weymouthfox says...

So what have the Weymouth BID achieved other than to create a highly paid job for an ex-councillor? What sort of world does the Chamber of Trade President live it? They have a "budget to look at the empty shops in Weymouth." Well the Echo has looked today and found too many closed abd about to close shops. The Chamber won't do anything about that.
The BID has spent thousands on new artwork from a Christchurch agency to remarket Weymouth. What does it show- a yacht and some children on a beach. What a waste of money. No wonder many local businesses have no confidence in the Weymouth BID.
So what have the Weymouth BID achieved other than to create a highly paid job for an ex-councillor? What sort of world does the Chamber of Trade President live it? They have a "budget to look at the empty shops in Weymouth." Well the Echo has looked today and found too many closed abd about to close shops. The Chamber won't do anything about that. The BID has spent thousands on new artwork from a Christchurch agency to remarket Weymouth. What does it show- a yacht and some children on a beach. What a waste of money. No wonder many local businesses have no confidence in the Weymouth BID. weymouthfox
  • Score: 2

5:26pm Tue 11 Mar 14

melcombe boy says...

chesil beach wrote:
Weymouth Ripoff Weymouth it should be named , Went to yeovil last thursday cost £1.60 for 3 hrs parking better shops AND police on patrol in town centre NO tramps NO beggers NO beggers disguised as buskers , and there were council street cleaners picking up litter , the town centre was clean and buzzing, Sooner weymouth close down the better,
Why do you bother to live round here? If it makes you that sad just move away.
[quote][p][bold]chesil beach[/bold] wrote: Weymouth Ripoff Weymouth it should be named , Went to yeovil last thursday cost £1.60 for 3 hrs parking better shops AND police on patrol in town centre NO tramps NO beggers NO beggers disguised as buskers , and there were council street cleaners picking up litter , the town centre was clean and buzzing, Sooner weymouth close down the better,[/p][/quote]Why do you bother to live round here? If it makes you that sad just move away. melcombe boy
  • Score: 9

5:26pm Tue 11 Mar 14

melcombe boy says...

chesil beach wrote:
Weymouth Ripoff Weymouth it should be named , Went to yeovil last thursday cost £1.60 for 3 hrs parking better shops AND police on patrol in town centre NO tramps NO beggers NO beggers disguised as buskers , and there were council street cleaners picking up litter , the town centre was clean and buzzing, Sooner weymouth close down the better,
Why do you bother to live round here? If it makes you that sad just move away.
[quote][p][bold]chesil beach[/bold] wrote: Weymouth Ripoff Weymouth it should be named , Went to yeovil last thursday cost £1.60 for 3 hrs parking better shops AND police on patrol in town centre NO tramps NO beggers NO beggers disguised as buskers , and there were council street cleaners picking up litter , the town centre was clean and buzzing, Sooner weymouth close down the better,[/p][/quote]Why do you bother to live round here? If it makes you that sad just move away. melcombe boy
  • Score: 5

5:32pm Tue 11 Mar 14

melcombe boy says...

melcombe boy wrote:
chesil beach wrote:
Weymouth Ripoff Weymouth it should be named , Went to yeovil last thursday cost £1.60 for 3 hrs parking better shops AND police on patrol in town centre NO tramps NO beggers NO beggers disguised as buskers , and there were council street cleaners picking up litter , the town centre was clean and buzzing, Sooner weymouth close down the better,
Why do you bother to live round here? If it makes you that sad just move away.
Saved a pound in parking fees but wasted 10 pounds on fuel. I'm impressed with your financial reasoning.
[quote][p][bold]melcombe boy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]chesil beach[/bold] wrote: Weymouth Ripoff Weymouth it should be named , Went to yeovil last thursday cost £1.60 for 3 hrs parking better shops AND police on patrol in town centre NO tramps NO beggers NO beggers disguised as buskers , and there were council street cleaners picking up litter , the town centre was clean and buzzing, Sooner weymouth close down the better,[/p][/quote]Why do you bother to live round here? If it makes you that sad just move away.[/p][/quote]Saved a pound in parking fees but wasted 10 pounds on fuel. I'm impressed with your financial reasoning. melcombe boy
  • Score: 8

6:54pm Tue 11 Mar 14

Pete_wey says...

There's not enough money in Weymouth, too many people doing 16 hrs a week on minimum wage.

What we need is several big employers to come to town where you can earn £20'000 per year.

The shops and recreation facilities will follow. Just look at Poole & Bournemouth!!!

The council should be trying to get several big financial institutions into the area.

Also I think we missed an opportunity to Southampton when Ikea was looking for a base on the south coast. It is all well and good getting big shops come to town but if it is the same shops as Bournemouth / Exeter have what chance do we have as we will always be the lesser option.

Think Nike village Oxford street - Harvey Nichols in Leeds.
There's not enough money in Weymouth, too many people doing 16 hrs a week on minimum wage. What we need is several big employers to come to town where you can earn £20'000 per year. The shops and recreation facilities will follow. Just look at Poole & Bournemouth!!! The council should be trying to get several big financial institutions into the area. Also I think we missed an opportunity to Southampton when Ikea was looking for a base on the south coast. It is all well and good getting big shops come to town but if it is the same shops as Bournemouth / Exeter have what chance do we have as we will always be the lesser option. Think Nike village Oxford street - Harvey Nichols in Leeds. Pete_wey
  • Score: 3

7:04pm Tue 11 Mar 14

topsy2 says...

I originated from W&P but moved away over 20 years ago. I still come back to see family and friends a couple of times a year. It does sadden me though when I walk around Weymouth Town Centre just how much has changed and I miss those shops which I frequented growing up that have now gone. I know some businesses have long ceased trading, but I remember the good old days of Timothy Whites, Hepworths and of course Woolies which gave the town some shopping vibrancy. I always understood that the business rates appeared very high in Weymouth, though how they bore in comparison to other areas, I have no idea. I also accept that the Council don't set the business rates.

As others have pointed out, internet sales of goods are becoming almost the norm for some people, myself included. But what are we supposed to do? Internet shopping can literally save someone hundreds of £s depending on what is bought and so the trade that would have gone to the shop is now done annonymously over the web.

Even when I did live in the area, my family and I often travelled to Salisbury or Exeter to go shopping because both cities were just an hour away and because sadly, Weymouth just couldn't hack it in the shopping stakes despite some of the former big names I mentioned earlier.

I hope the town pulls itself back on track, though now, not even the train runs along Weymouth quayside anymore!? I have no idea what happened to the Brewers Quay development, but I quite enjoyed going there and it did seem to attract tourists who in turn undoubtedly spent their money in the shops

Quite what the future holds is anyones guess but some serious work needs to be done.
I originated from W&P but moved away over 20 years ago. I still come back to see family and friends a couple of times a year. It does sadden me though when I walk around Weymouth Town Centre just how much has changed and I miss those shops which I frequented growing up that have now gone. I know some businesses have long ceased trading, but I remember the good old days of Timothy Whites, Hepworths and of course Woolies which gave the town some shopping vibrancy. I always understood that the business rates appeared very high in Weymouth, though how they bore in comparison to other areas, I have no idea. I also accept that the Council don't set the business rates. As others have pointed out, internet sales of goods are becoming almost the norm for some people, myself included. But what are we supposed to do? Internet shopping can literally save someone hundreds of £s depending on what is bought and so the trade that would have gone to the shop is now done annonymously over the web. Even when I did live in the area, my family and I often travelled to Salisbury or Exeter to go shopping because both cities were just an hour away and because sadly, Weymouth just couldn't hack it in the shopping stakes despite some of the former big names I mentioned earlier. I hope the town pulls itself back on track, though now, not even the train runs along Weymouth quayside anymore!? I have no idea what happened to the Brewers Quay development, but I quite enjoyed going there and it did seem to attract tourists who in turn undoubtedly spent their money in the shops Quite what the future holds is anyones guess but some serious work needs to be done. topsy2
  • Score: 8

7:04pm Tue 11 Mar 14

I'mavoter says...

catwoman2 wrote:
I avoid shopping in Weymouth due to the ridiculously high parking charges. I can park in Dorchester for two hours for just £1!
Me too, for the same reason. Very few empty shops in Dorchester , the town is buzzing.
[quote][p][bold]catwoman2[/bold] wrote: I avoid shopping in Weymouth due to the ridiculously high parking charges. I can park in Dorchester for two hours for just £1![/p][/quote]Me too, for the same reason. Very few empty shops in Dorchester , the town is buzzing. I'mavoter
  • Score: 6

7:13pm Tue 11 Mar 14

I'mavoter says...

Simon 1965 wrote:
No point blaiming the council or car parking charges, this is a UK wide trend, brought on by the move to out of town shopping centres and internet retailing.

Thankfully, and mainly due to the tourist trade, Weymouth retains a fairly vibrant town centre, it is actualy bucking the trend compared to the amount of empty shops in other areas.

If you don`t believe me, I can give you hundreds of examples, but lets start with Newport, South Wales.

Simon N.
Simon, we're not bothered about Newport South Wales, we're interested in Weymouth . And if you think Weymouth is bucking the trend, how come it looks so run down and virtually derelict, whereas Dorchester is alive and well, with far fewer empty shops, and is buzzing by comparison, eh ?
[quote][p][bold]Simon 1965[/bold] wrote: No point blaiming the council or car parking charges, this is a UK wide trend, brought on by the move to out of town shopping centres and internet retailing. Thankfully, and mainly due to the tourist trade, Weymouth retains a fairly vibrant town centre, it is actualy bucking the trend compared to the amount of empty shops in other areas. If you don`t believe me, I can give you hundreds of examples, but lets start with Newport, South Wales. Simon N.[/p][/quote]Simon, we're not bothered about Newport South Wales, we're interested in Weymouth . And if you think Weymouth is bucking the trend, how come it looks so run down and virtually derelict, whereas Dorchester is alive and well, with far fewer empty shops, and is buzzing by comparison, eh ? I'mavoter
  • Score: 5

8:09pm Tue 11 Mar 14

Akita_Abigail says...

As a small business in Weymouth with even an extra offering of a unique service to Weymouth to my normal day-to-day business I still feel like I am swimming in mud.... I am like Ladybirds not in the two main streets due to the astronomical rents, etc.... I am constantly offering leaflets with discounts and welcoming passers by with a good morning, whether they come in or not.... making me the cheapest around... I hold several charity events... what more can I do?
As a small business in Weymouth with even an extra offering of a unique service to Weymouth to my normal day-to-day business I still feel like I am swimming in mud.... I am like Ladybirds not in the two main streets due to the astronomical rents, etc.... I am constantly offering leaflets with discounts and welcoming passers by with a good morning, whether they come in or not.... making me the cheapest around... I hold several charity events... what more can I do? Akita_Abigail
  • Score: 5

8:13pm Tue 11 Mar 14

I'mavoter says...

Simon 1965 wrote:
The Park & Ride at Weymouth remains excellent value, especially outside of the tourist season.

Simon N.
.... You mean Only outside the tourist season, he he.
[quote][p][bold]Simon 1965[/bold] wrote: The Park & Ride at Weymouth remains excellent value, especially outside of the tourist season. Simon N.[/p][/quote].... You mean Only outside the tourist season, he he. I'mavoter
  • Score: -5

8:16pm Tue 11 Mar 14

Simon Nicholas says...

As an outsider, I have always found Dorchester underwhelming, as do all my mates, and their families from my home area, who choose to holiday in Dorset. And this is why we holiday in Weymouth, happily spending considerable amounts of money there in the process. Its got it all for us, and still very much "buzzing" in the Summer months,

Whilst I respect Dorchester, I have no wish to eat Nandos style fast food, or do not wish to see teddy bears, immitations of Tuten Khamoon or dinosaur relics, so I shall continue to visit Weymouth thank you very much.

I can only assume you are "a glass half empty" person if you think Weymouth is derelict. The fact that the posting you object to got 10 likes, and your response only got 1, says it all really.

If you don`t like the place, please move away - otherwise stop moaning and help the town by spending some money there - the fact that you don`t means that you are part of the problem..........

Cheers
Simon N.
As an outsider, I have always found Dorchester underwhelming, as do all my mates, and their families from my home area, who choose to holiday in Dorset. And this is why we holiday in Weymouth, happily spending considerable amounts of money there in the process. Its got it all for us, and still very much "buzzing" in the Summer months, Whilst I respect Dorchester, I have no wish to eat Nandos style fast food, or do not wish to see teddy bears, immitations of Tuten Khamoon or dinosaur relics, so I shall continue to visit Weymouth thank you very much. I can only assume you are "a glass half empty" person if you think Weymouth is derelict. The fact that the posting you object to got 10 likes, and your response only got 1, says it all really. If you don`t like the place, please move away - otherwise stop moaning and help the town by spending some money there - the fact that you don`t means that you are part of the problem.......... Cheers Simon N. Simon Nicholas
  • Score: 12

8:26pm Tue 11 Mar 14

I'mavoter says...

Under35andout wrote:
the council are stupid , they made this town like it is , expect high biz rates with hardly no income + , buy into weymouth watch the council suck you dry , wait till winter you will fail ,. sure buy now while its summer when winter comes you all gonna be sucked dry , no hmo licences for anyone , lose your morgages , your hotels and shops to the bloodsuckers at the council anyone in the right mind would sell up and leave this Flea invested town run by a corrupt council , look at all them faces in the paper , who do you trust ?>?? mt friend lost his house , his hotel and his life to these bloodsuckers
So why are you still here. ???
[quote][p][bold]Under35andout[/bold] wrote: the council are stupid , they made this town like it is , expect high biz rates with hardly no income + , buy into weymouth watch the council suck you dry , wait till winter you will fail ,. sure buy now while its summer when winter comes you all gonna be sucked dry , no hmo licences for anyone , lose your morgages , your hotels and shops to the bloodsuckers at the council anyone in the right mind would sell up and leave this Flea invested town run by a corrupt council , look at all them faces in the paper , who do you trust ?>?? mt friend lost his house , his hotel and his life to these bloodsuckers[/p][/quote]So why are you still here. ??? I'mavoter
  • Score: 4

9:00pm Tue 11 Mar 14

Simon Nicholas says...

Do any of you think that your town is any different to the vast majority in the UK. I travel extensively with my work, and enjoy reading the local press when I am away - its almost always a carbon copy of this site and the comments are always the same "our town is derelict, all the shops are closed, it was much better in 1970, the council are corrupt and to blaim for everything, parking charges are too high" - you however are VERY lucky, you have thousands of people who come back year after year to visit this wonderful town with a fantastic beach and harbour, great coastline, and a still more and adequate town centre retail offering, spending shedloads of money in the process. This however will be my final post on this web-site, I have finally realised that people do not like the truth, they would rather just rejoice in their humorous (to them anyway) put downs about how rubbish everything is - if this was meant to be a forum for intelligent debate, its lost of here unfortunately, due to the "wind up" merchants, who seem to have nothing else to do in their petty lives but spread misery, when it reality, things really are not that bad.

Very best wishes to the people who support Weymouth (which like everything else is less than perfect, but its more than fine), shop in Weymouth, and are doing their best to make a difference.

(The last posting of) Simon N.
Do any of you think that your town is any different to the vast majority in the UK. I travel extensively with my work, and enjoy reading the local press when I am away - its almost always a carbon copy of this site and the comments are always the same "our town is derelict, all the shops are closed, it was much better in 1970, the council are corrupt and to blaim for everything, parking charges are too high" - you however are VERY lucky, you have thousands of people who come back year after year to visit this wonderful town with a fantastic beach and harbour, great coastline, and a still more and adequate town centre retail offering, spending shedloads of money in the process. This however will be my final post on this web-site, I have finally realised that people do not like the truth, they would rather just rejoice in their humorous (to them anyway) put downs about how rubbish everything is - if this was meant to be a forum for intelligent debate, its lost of here unfortunately, due to the "wind up" merchants, who seem to have nothing else to do in their petty lives but spread misery, when it reality, things really are not that bad. Very best wishes to the people who support Weymouth (which like everything else is less than perfect, but its more than fine), shop in Weymouth, and are doing their best to make a difference. (The last posting of) Simon N. Simon Nicholas
  • Score: 10

9:10pm Tue 11 Mar 14

Parkstreetshufle says...

Get a grip wrote:
Parkstreetshufle wrote:
Get a grip wrote:
Parkstreetshufle wrote:
The old Next premises if for rent in St Marys street. £1350 per week rent. Im guessing but Id estimate that the business rates are at least half the rent, £700 pw, add electric and phone your looking at the fat end of £2,500 a week just to break even. The council continue to raise rates. Whats the incentive to run a business in town. Its a dead end because infrastructure is not supporting business, its bleeding it dry. Weymouth and Portland is controlled by those that have passed through the system and are not considering those that have yet to do so. Selfish and irresponsible. The entire council, local and county, needs to be gutted from the top floor, like an old building and hire fresh blood. Men and women that have an invested interest in creating a sustainable life in the area, not just a decade or so of reitrement.
You must understand that the council do not own the shops and have no control over the rents.

Business rates are not fixed by the council.
Of course a realise that - where have I said that the council set rent?
Perhaps you would be better to read a response before rushing to point out mistakes. Being a pedant is the new trolling, slightly less offensive, but ultimately pointless and unrewarding for either poster or pedant. Keep your hands in your pockets...

Of the consortium owned property in town, the council will certainly advise the owners of the rent level, either directly or through others. The council collect the rates, you can bet your bottom euro they set the rates, they might be covered by government legislation but trying to suggest that the council are just government automatons is ridiculous. The council, just like every other government institution are a collection of people all using the rules to suit, its not a matter of if they do this - just to what extent and who that benefits.
Again I come back to my point, at some stage we will need to address the dwindling number of young people and young families. The mentality is to keep Weymouth as a picture postcard. This mentality is killing it. Soon it will be a ghost town like something from Wales. Nobody says you have to forget the past - but you have to embrace the future, and that is not allowing a council composed of very conservative much older people make all the decisions.
Your comments only show to me that you simply do not understand the whole issues of how rent and rates are calculated.
Your comments show me you just want to put people down. If you did understand anything you would be trying to tell us but your more interested in trying to pretend you are better than everyone else.
That makes you a troll. You might dress it up a bit but that's what your doing. Nothing constructive to say - don't bother commenting...
[quote][p][bold]Get a grip[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Parkstreetshufle[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Get a grip[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Parkstreetshufle[/bold] wrote: The old Next premises if for rent in St Marys street. £1350 per week rent. Im guessing but Id estimate that the business rates are at least half the rent, £700 pw, add electric and phone your looking at the fat end of £2,500 a week just to break even. The council continue to raise rates. Whats the incentive to run a business in town. Its a dead end because infrastructure is not supporting business, its bleeding it dry. Weymouth and Portland is controlled by those that have passed through the system and are not considering those that have yet to do so. Selfish and irresponsible. The entire council, local and county, needs to be gutted from the top floor, like an old building and hire fresh blood. Men and women that have an invested interest in creating a sustainable life in the area, not just a decade or so of reitrement.[/p][/quote]You must understand that the council do not own the shops and have no control over the rents. Business rates are not fixed by the council.[/p][/quote]Of course a realise that - where have I said that the council set rent? Perhaps you would be better to read a response before rushing to point out mistakes. Being a pedant is the new trolling, slightly less offensive, but ultimately pointless and unrewarding for either poster or pedant. Keep your hands in your pockets... Of the consortium owned property in town, the council will certainly advise the owners of the rent level, either directly or through others. The council collect the rates, you can bet your bottom euro they set the rates, they might be covered by government legislation but trying to suggest that the council are just government automatons is ridiculous. The council, just like every other government institution are a collection of people all using the rules to suit, its not a matter of if they do this - just to what extent and who that benefits. Again I come back to my point, at some stage we will need to address the dwindling number of young people and young families. The mentality is to keep Weymouth as a picture postcard. This mentality is killing it. Soon it will be a ghost town like something from Wales. Nobody says you have to forget the past - but you have to embrace the future, and that is not allowing a council composed of very conservative much older people make all the decisions.[/p][/quote]Your comments only show to me that you simply do not understand the whole issues of how rent and rates are calculated.[/p][/quote]Your comments show me you just want to put people down. If you did understand anything you would be trying to tell us but your more interested in trying to pretend you are better than everyone else. That makes you a troll. You might dress it up a bit but that's what your doing. Nothing constructive to say - don't bother commenting... Parkstreetshufle
  • Score: 0

9:27pm Tue 11 Mar 14

Get a grip says...

Parkstreetshufle wrote:
Get a grip wrote:
Parkstreetshufle wrote:
Get a grip wrote:
Parkstreetshufle wrote:
The old Next premises if for rent in St Marys street. £1350 per week rent. Im guessing but Id estimate that the business rates are at least half the rent, £700 pw, add electric and phone your looking at the fat end of £2,500 a week just to break even. The council continue to raise rates. Whats the incentive to run a business in town. Its a dead end because infrastructure is not supporting business, its bleeding it dry. Weymouth and Portland is controlled by those that have passed through the system and are not considering those that have yet to do so. Selfish and irresponsible. The entire council, local and county, needs to be gutted from the top floor, like an old building and hire fresh blood. Men and women that have an invested interest in creating a sustainable life in the area, not just a decade or so of reitrement.
You must understand that the council do not own the shops and have no control over the rents.

Business rates are not fixed by the council.
Of course a realise that - where have I said that the council set rent?
Perhaps you would be better to read a response before rushing to point out mistakes. Being a pedant is the new trolling, slightly less offensive, but ultimately pointless and unrewarding for either poster or pedant. Keep your hands in your pockets...

Of the consortium owned property in town, the council will certainly advise the owners of the rent level, either directly or through others. The council collect the rates, you can bet your bottom euro they set the rates, they might be covered by government legislation but trying to suggest that the council are just government automatons is ridiculous. The council, just like every other government institution are a collection of people all using the rules to suit, its not a matter of if they do this - just to what extent and who that benefits.
Again I come back to my point, at some stage we will need to address the dwindling number of young people and young families. The mentality is to keep Weymouth as a picture postcard. This mentality is killing it. Soon it will be a ghost town like something from Wales. Nobody says you have to forget the past - but you have to embrace the future, and that is not allowing a council composed of very conservative much older people make all the decisions.
Your comments only show to me that you simply do not understand the whole issues of how rent and rates are calculated.
Your comments show me you just want to put people down. If you did understand anything you would be trying to tell us but your more interested in trying to pretend you are better than everyone else.
That makes you a troll. You might dress it up a bit but that's what your doing. Nothing constructive to say - don't bother commenting...
When you are in a hole stop digging
[quote][p][bold]Parkstreetshufle[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Get a grip[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Parkstreetshufle[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Get a grip[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Parkstreetshufle[/bold] wrote: The old Next premises if for rent in St Marys street. £1350 per week rent. Im guessing but Id estimate that the business rates are at least half the rent, £700 pw, add electric and phone your looking at the fat end of £2,500 a week just to break even. The council continue to raise rates. Whats the incentive to run a business in town. Its a dead end because infrastructure is not supporting business, its bleeding it dry. Weymouth and Portland is controlled by those that have passed through the system and are not considering those that have yet to do so. Selfish and irresponsible. The entire council, local and county, needs to be gutted from the top floor, like an old building and hire fresh blood. Men and women that have an invested interest in creating a sustainable life in the area, not just a decade or so of reitrement.[/p][/quote]You must understand that the council do not own the shops and have no control over the rents. Business rates are not fixed by the council.[/p][/quote]Of course a realise that - where have I said that the council set rent? Perhaps you would be better to read a response before rushing to point out mistakes. Being a pedant is the new trolling, slightly less offensive, but ultimately pointless and unrewarding for either poster or pedant. Keep your hands in your pockets... Of the consortium owned property in town, the council will certainly advise the owners of the rent level, either directly or through others. The council collect the rates, you can bet your bottom euro they set the rates, they might be covered by government legislation but trying to suggest that the council are just government automatons is ridiculous. The council, just like every other government institution are a collection of people all using the rules to suit, its not a matter of if they do this - just to what extent and who that benefits. Again I come back to my point, at some stage we will need to address the dwindling number of young people and young families. The mentality is to keep Weymouth as a picture postcard. This mentality is killing it. Soon it will be a ghost town like something from Wales. Nobody says you have to forget the past - but you have to embrace the future, and that is not allowing a council composed of very conservative much older people make all the decisions.[/p][/quote]Your comments only show to me that you simply do not understand the whole issues of how rent and rates are calculated.[/p][/quote]Your comments show me you just want to put people down. If you did understand anything you would be trying to tell us but your more interested in trying to pretend you are better than everyone else. That makes you a troll. You might dress it up a bit but that's what your doing. Nothing constructive to say - don't bother commenting...[/p][/quote]When you are in a hole stop digging Get a grip
  • Score: 4

9:38pm Tue 11 Mar 14

I'mavoter says...

Simon Nicholas wrote:
As an outsider, I have always found Dorchester underwhelming, as do all my mates, and their families from my home area, who choose to holiday in Dorset. And this is why we holiday in Weymouth, happily spending considerable amounts of money there in the process. Its got it all for us, and still very much "buzzing" in the Summer months,

Whilst I respect Dorchester, I have no wish to eat Nandos style fast food, or do not wish to see teddy bears, immitations of Tuten Khamoon or dinosaur relics, so I shall continue to visit Weymouth thank you very much.

I can only assume you are "a glass half empty" person if you think Weymouth is derelict. The fact that the posting you object to got 10 likes, and your response only got 1, says it all really.

If you don`t like the place, please move away - otherwise stop moaning and help the town by spending some money there - the fact that you don`t means that you are part of the problem..........

Cheers
Simon N.
I appreciate your comments Simon , but the point I was trying to make ( which I notice you failed to answer in your less than complimentary second posting) was that you said Weymouth was bucking the trend, and I asked how that could be, with 27 empty shops, several empty pubs, a struggling theatre, and a backward looking council, whereas I made the comparison to our neighbours just a few miles away in Dorchester , where there is a definite 'buzz' and lots of investment. I didn't say I didn't like Weymouth , indeed I do, but I would just like to see it do a lot better.. We really do need decent indoor things to do for our visitors when the weather is bad, where the council offices are now, I would like to see a really good quality hotel, perhaps with small conference facilities. Yes I do tend to shop more in Dorchester, because there are a far better range of shps there, and much cheaper parking, and some excellent eating places too, not just Nandos.
[quote][p][bold]Simon Nicholas[/bold] wrote: As an outsider, I have always found Dorchester underwhelming, as do all my mates, and their families from my home area, who choose to holiday in Dorset. And this is why we holiday in Weymouth, happily spending considerable amounts of money there in the process. Its got it all for us, and still very much "buzzing" in the Summer months, Whilst I respect Dorchester, I have no wish to eat Nandos style fast food, or do not wish to see teddy bears, immitations of Tuten Khamoon or dinosaur relics, so I shall continue to visit Weymouth thank you very much. I can only assume you are "a glass half empty" person if you think Weymouth is derelict. The fact that the posting you object to got 10 likes, and your response only got 1, says it all really. If you don`t like the place, please move away - otherwise stop moaning and help the town by spending some money there - the fact that you don`t means that you are part of the problem.......... Cheers Simon N.[/p][/quote]I appreciate your comments Simon , but the point I was trying to make ( which I notice you failed to answer in your less than complimentary second posting) was that you said Weymouth was bucking the trend, and I asked how that could be, with 27 empty shops, several empty pubs, a struggling theatre, and a backward looking council, whereas I made the comparison to our neighbours just a few miles away in Dorchester , where there is a definite 'buzz' and lots of investment. I didn't say I didn't like Weymouth , indeed I do, but I would just like to see it do a lot better.. We really do need decent indoor things to do for our visitors when the weather is bad, where the council offices are now, I would like to see a really good quality hotel, perhaps with small conference facilities. Yes I do tend to shop more in Dorchester, because there are a far better range of shps there, and much cheaper parking, and some excellent eating places too, not just Nandos. I'mavoter
  • Score: 3

9:56pm Tue 11 Mar 14

Caption Sensible says...

Let some space along Commercial Road for large shopping development. Allow a 'Lanes' type development to evolve in the existing shopping streets. At the moment there is no large spaces to tempt the bigger stores into town. The spaces available in St. Mary and Thomas Streets are too small.

Or, build a proper development out of town.
Let some space along Commercial Road for large shopping development. Allow a 'Lanes' type development to evolve in the existing shopping streets. At the moment there is no large spaces to tempt the bigger stores into town. The spaces available in St. Mary and Thomas Streets are too small. Or, build a proper development out of town. Caption Sensible
  • Score: 4

10:50pm Tue 11 Mar 14

luffy22 says...

The problem with the empty shops is due to one fact, highly unaffordable expensive rent and rates,I used to own a business in Weymouth and when looking for properties was completely surprised at rents. If the big multiples can't afford the rents and rates how do people expect small startups to stump up that sort of cash. Perhaps rent and rates should be based on turnover of the business, but thats not going to happen as the landlords are pension pot holders looking for return for their money.
The problem with the empty shops is due to one fact, highly unaffordable expensive rent and rates,I used to own a business in Weymouth and when looking for properties was completely surprised at rents. If the big multiples can't afford the rents and rates how do people expect small startups to stump up that sort of cash. Perhaps rent and rates should be based on turnover of the business, but thats not going to happen as the landlords are pension pot holders looking for return for their money. luffy22
  • Score: 8

11:39pm Tue 11 Mar 14

JamesYoung says...

It's no good dreaming of low rents. Retail is in long term downtrend - you can see that everywhere. Remember the electronics shops in Tottenham Court Road in London, where everybody went to shop for computer bargains. Pretty much all gone now, or moved online. This isn't a Weymouth specific problem.
People want a revitalised Weymouth, but that is going to be hard to achieve with such a large town centre, and with a culture based around alcohol. Areas of the town need to be gentrified and converted to something other than shops - residential housing is much needed, but must be cheap enough for local people, because it is local people who spend the money in the off season.
I'd start by demolishing the Pavilion and building a large water park on the site. Working along the lines of Torquay's Living Coasts or the National Aquarium in Plymouth, i'd also relocate the Sea Life Centre to the same area. Knock down the Alexandra Gardens and build a smaller theatre there. Build a double deck car park where the Swannery Car Park is now. Turn the seafront roadway into a single, one way carriageway, and use the other carriageway to provide a tramway running from Lodmoor (which would become a big park and ride site) to the Harbour side, where the main attractions are. Recognize that the sea front is an area for families and enforce strict no alcohol rules there. Move the pubs and clubs back into the town, away from the sea front.
Of course all of this requires money and vision, but if you don't invest in your tourists and instead rely on a declining retail industry you will just end up like every other crumbling seaside town: a haven for benefit tourists, with long term unemployment, teen pregnancy, drug and alcohol problems bubbling below the surface.
It's no good dreaming of low rents. Retail is in long term downtrend - you can see that everywhere. Remember the electronics shops in Tottenham Court Road in London, where everybody went to shop for computer bargains. Pretty much all gone now, or moved online. This isn't a Weymouth specific problem. People want a revitalised Weymouth, but that is going to be hard to achieve with such a large town centre, and with a culture based around alcohol. Areas of the town need to be gentrified and converted to something other than shops - residential housing is much needed, but must be cheap enough for local people, because it is local people who spend the money in the off season. I'd start by demolishing the Pavilion and building a large water park on the site. Working along the lines of Torquay's Living Coasts or the National Aquarium in Plymouth, i'd also relocate the Sea Life Centre to the same area. Knock down the Alexandra Gardens and build a smaller theatre there. Build a double deck car park where the Swannery Car Park is now. Turn the seafront roadway into a single, one way carriageway, and use the other carriageway to provide a tramway running from Lodmoor (which would become a big park and ride site) to the Harbour side, where the main attractions are. Recognize that the sea front is an area for families and enforce strict no alcohol rules there. Move the pubs and clubs back into the town, away from the sea front. Of course all of this requires money and vision, but if you don't invest in your tourists and instead rely on a declining retail industry you will just end up like every other crumbling seaside town: a haven for benefit tourists, with long term unemployment, teen pregnancy, drug and alcohol problems bubbling below the surface. JamesYoung
  • Score: 4

12:54am Wed 12 Mar 14

westbaywonder says...

chesil beach wrote:
Weymouth Ripoff Weymouth it should be named , Went to yeovil last thursday cost £1.60 for 3 hrs parking better shops AND police on patrol in town centre NO tramps NO beggers NO beggers disguised as buskers , and there were council street cleaners picking up litter , the town centre was clean and buzzing, Sooner weymouth close down the better,
So you went all the way to Yeovil to buy a copy of the big issue and look for coppers and social outcasts.LOL!

How Sad, add the price of the fuel to get to Yeovil and your £1.60 car park fee is no longer a cheap option.
Have a coffee and think before you act Sir.
[quote][p][bold]chesil beach[/bold] wrote: Weymouth Ripoff Weymouth it should be named , Went to yeovil last thursday cost £1.60 for 3 hrs parking better shops AND police on patrol in town centre NO tramps NO beggers NO beggers disguised as buskers , and there were council street cleaners picking up litter , the town centre was clean and buzzing, Sooner weymouth close down the better,[/p][/quote]So you went all the way to Yeovil to buy a copy of the big issue and look for coppers and social outcasts.LOL! How Sad, add the price of the fuel to get to Yeovil and your £1.60 car park fee is no longer a cheap option. Have a coffee and think before you act Sir. westbaywonder
  • Score: 4

8:08am Wed 12 Mar 14

arlbergbahn says...

Simon Nicholas wrote:
As an outsider, I have always found Dorchester underwhelming, as do all my mates, and their families from my home area, who choose to holiday in Dorset. And this is why we holiday in Weymouth, happily spending considerable amounts of money there in the process. Its got it all for us, and still very much "buzzing" in the Summer months,

Whilst I respect Dorchester, I have no wish to eat Nandos style fast food, or do not wish to see teddy bears, immitations of Tuten Khamoon or dinosaur relics, so I shall continue to visit Weymouth thank you very much.

I can only assume you are "a glass half empty" person if you think Weymouth is derelict. The fact that the posting you object to got 10 likes, and your response only got 1, says it all really.

If you don`t like the place, please move away - otherwise stop moaning and help the town by spending some money there - the fact that you don`t means that you are part of the problem..........

Cheers
Simon N.
What is it about Weymouthy you find so appealing? the beach? That's about it. Which is fine from say May to September, but what about the rest of the year? The rest of the year it's dreary, cold, windswept and depressing. What is it about Weymouth that appeals during the wintry months?
[quote][p][bold]Simon Nicholas[/bold] wrote: As an outsider, I have always found Dorchester underwhelming, as do all my mates, and their families from my home area, who choose to holiday in Dorset. And this is why we holiday in Weymouth, happily spending considerable amounts of money there in the process. Its got it all for us, and still very much "buzzing" in the Summer months, Whilst I respect Dorchester, I have no wish to eat Nandos style fast food, or do not wish to see teddy bears, immitations of Tuten Khamoon or dinosaur relics, so I shall continue to visit Weymouth thank you very much. I can only assume you are "a glass half empty" person if you think Weymouth is derelict. The fact that the posting you object to got 10 likes, and your response only got 1, says it all really. If you don`t like the place, please move away - otherwise stop moaning and help the town by spending some money there - the fact that you don`t means that you are part of the problem.......... Cheers Simon N.[/p][/quote]What is it about Weymouthy you find so appealing? the beach? That's about it. Which is fine from say May to September, but what about the rest of the year? The rest of the year it's dreary, cold, windswept and depressing. What is it about Weymouth that appeals during the wintry months? arlbergbahn
  • Score: -5

10:08am Wed 12 Mar 14

Get a grip says...

JamesYoung wrote:
It's no good dreaming of low rents. Retail is in long term downtrend - you can see that everywhere. Remember the electronics shops in Tottenham Court Road in London, where everybody went to shop for computer bargains. Pretty much all gone now, or moved online. This isn't a Weymouth specific problem. People want a revitalised Weymouth, but that is going to be hard to achieve with such a large town centre, and with a culture based around alcohol. Areas of the town need to be gentrified and converted to something other than shops - residential housing is much needed, but must be cheap enough for local people, because it is local people who spend the money in the off season. I'd start by demolishing the Pavilion and building a large water park on the site. Working along the lines of Torquay's Living Coasts or the National Aquarium in Plymouth, i'd also relocate the Sea Life Centre to the same area. Knock down the Alexandra Gardens and build a smaller theatre there. Build a double deck car park where the Swannery Car Park is now. Turn the seafront roadway into a single, one way carriageway, and use the other carriageway to provide a tramway running from Lodmoor (which would become a big park and ride site) to the Harbour side, where the main attractions are. Recognize that the sea front is an area for families and enforce strict no alcohol rules there. Move the pubs and clubs back into the town, away from the sea front. Of course all of this requires money and vision, but if you don't invest in your tourists and instead rely on a declining retail industry you will just end up like every other crumbling seaside town: a haven for benefit tourists, with long term unemployment, teen pregnancy, drug and alcohol problems bubbling below the surface.
Many good ideas here but as you say all require money.

But if we do not try then we might just as well put up the "closed sign"
[quote][p][bold]JamesYoung[/bold] wrote: It's no good dreaming of low rents. Retail is in long term downtrend - you can see that everywhere. Remember the electronics shops in Tottenham Court Road in London, where everybody went to shop for computer bargains. Pretty much all gone now, or moved online. This isn't a Weymouth specific problem. People want a revitalised Weymouth, but that is going to be hard to achieve with such a large town centre, and with a culture based around alcohol. Areas of the town need to be gentrified and converted to something other than shops - residential housing is much needed, but must be cheap enough for local people, because it is local people who spend the money in the off season. I'd start by demolishing the Pavilion and building a large water park on the site. Working along the lines of Torquay's Living Coasts or the National Aquarium in Plymouth, i'd also relocate the Sea Life Centre to the same area. Knock down the Alexandra Gardens and build a smaller theatre there. Build a double deck car park where the Swannery Car Park is now. Turn the seafront roadway into a single, one way carriageway, and use the other carriageway to provide a tramway running from Lodmoor (which would become a big park and ride site) to the Harbour side, where the main attractions are. Recognize that the sea front is an area for families and enforce strict no alcohol rules there. Move the pubs and clubs back into the town, away from the sea front. Of course all of this requires money and vision, but if you don't invest in your tourists and instead rely on a declining retail industry you will just end up like every other crumbling seaside town: a haven for benefit tourists, with long term unemployment, teen pregnancy, drug and alcohol problems bubbling below the surface.[/p][/quote]Many good ideas here but as you say all require money. But if we do not try then we might just as well put up the "closed sign" Get a grip
  • Score: 0

10:46am Wed 12 Mar 14

wowfood says...

siriem wrote:
wowfood wrote:
Personally I'd argue that what we need is a larger array of indoor entertainment and eat out places. Dorch has gotten wagamamas, nando, zizis etc, what do we have? A bella pasta and a couple McDs / subways. If a family comes down here on holiday there really aren't that many great places in town for them to eat, aside from getting fish and chips that is. Likewise for locals. If I want to go for a meal with friends / family we wind up in dorch because it's not bella pasta.

Likewise indoor entertainment. We have a load of arcades on the seafront with the same machines they had in there 20 years back. That's about it. Would be nice to have somewhere in town with a kids zone, for younger kids who come here and get rained out. They could probably make one out of the skeleton of the colwell center.

Would also be nice if the weymouth pavillion hired a decent advertiser. I'll ocasionally here wind of something I find interesting through the grapevine, but unless I'm looking I never know what they have there. I know more about what's happening at the Bic than the pavillion so it's no wonder it died and then came back only to risk death a second time.
There are loads of amazing places to eat and drink in Weymouth and I would hate to see any incursion by the microwave jockeys of the high street chains. Il Porto, The Red Lion, Monkey's Fist, Ocean Bistro, Mallams, The Ship, The George Bar & Grill, Vaughn's, Flood 's, Sense, Manbo's, The Dining Room, Enzo's and The Dorset Burger Co are just a few of the fine eating places in Weymouth, not to mention the many excellent fish & chip shops, tea rooms and cafés. In fact the town is spoilt for choice and quality. And you want Nando's? The fact that Flamin' Chooks - a Nando's clone - didn't survive, shows that you're definitely in a minority.
I'm not disputing the number of places to eat, and for a local or somebody who knows somebody local it's great. The problem is the tourists. If you're on holiday though a lot of people will want somewhere familiar, as opposed to local grub from the pub. That's why a few chain stores would be nice...

Okay in all honesty all I want is an Edz and a wagamamas. Possibly a burger king. but still.
[quote][p][bold]siriem[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]wowfood[/bold] wrote: Personally I'd argue that what we need is a larger array of indoor entertainment and eat out places. Dorch has gotten wagamamas, nando, zizis etc, what do we have? A bella pasta and a couple McDs / subways. If a family comes down here on holiday there really aren't that many great places in town for them to eat, aside from getting fish and chips that is. Likewise for locals. If I want to go for a meal with friends / family we wind up in dorch because it's not bella pasta. Likewise indoor entertainment. We have a load of arcades on the seafront with the same machines they had in there 20 years back. That's about it. Would be nice to have somewhere in town with a kids zone, for younger kids who come here and get rained out. They could probably make one out of the skeleton of the colwell center. Would also be nice if the weymouth pavillion hired a decent advertiser. I'll ocasionally here wind of something I find interesting through the grapevine, but unless I'm looking I never know what they have there. I know more about what's happening at the Bic than the pavillion so it's no wonder it died and then came back only to risk death a second time.[/p][/quote]There are loads of amazing places to eat and drink in Weymouth and I would hate to see any incursion by the microwave jockeys of the high street chains. Il Porto, The Red Lion, Monkey's Fist, Ocean Bistro, Mallams, The Ship, The George Bar & Grill, Vaughn's, Flood 's, Sense, Manbo's, The Dining Room, Enzo's and The Dorset Burger Co are just a few of the fine eating places in Weymouth, not to mention the many excellent fish & chip shops, tea rooms and cafés. In fact the town is spoilt for choice and quality. And you want Nando's? The fact that Flamin' Chooks - a Nando's clone - didn't survive, shows that you're definitely in a minority.[/p][/quote]I'm not disputing the number of places to eat, and for a local or somebody who knows somebody local it's great. The problem is the tourists. If you're on holiday though a lot of people will want somewhere familiar, as opposed to local grub from the pub. That's why a few chain stores would be nice... Okay in all honesty all I want is an Edz and a wagamamas. Possibly a burger king. but still. wowfood
  • Score: -3

12:18pm Wed 12 Mar 14

Parkstreetshufle says...

Get a grip wrote:
Parkstreetshufle wrote:
Get a grip wrote:
Parkstreetshufle wrote:
Get a grip wrote:
Parkstreetshufle wrote:
The old Next premises if for rent in St Marys street. £1350 per week rent. Im guessing but Id estimate that the business rates are at least half the rent, £700 pw, add electric and phone your looking at the fat end of £2,500 a week just to break even. The council continue to raise rates. Whats the incentive to run a business in town. Its a dead end because infrastructure is not supporting business, its bleeding it dry. Weymouth and Portland is controlled by those that have passed through the system and are not considering those that have yet to do so. Selfish and irresponsible. The entire council, local and county, needs to be gutted from the top floor, like an old building and hire fresh blood. Men and women that have an invested interest in creating a sustainable life in the area, not just a decade or so of reitrement.
You must understand that the council do not own the shops and have no control over the rents.

Business rates are not fixed by the council.
Of course a realise that - where have I said that the council set rent?
Perhaps you would be better to read a response before rushing to point out mistakes. Being a pedant is the new trolling, slightly less offensive, but ultimately pointless and unrewarding for either poster or pedant. Keep your hands in your pockets...

Of the consortium owned property in town, the council will certainly advise the owners of the rent level, either directly or through others. The council collect the rates, you can bet your bottom euro they set the rates, they might be covered by government legislation but trying to suggest that the council are just government automatons is ridiculous. The council, just like every other government institution are a collection of people all using the rules to suit, its not a matter of if they do this - just to what extent and who that benefits.
Again I come back to my point, at some stage we will need to address the dwindling number of young people and young families. The mentality is to keep Weymouth as a picture postcard. This mentality is killing it. Soon it will be a ghost town like something from Wales. Nobody says you have to forget the past - but you have to embrace the future, and that is not allowing a council composed of very conservative much older people make all the decisions.
Your comments only show to me that you simply do not understand the whole issues of how rent and rates are calculated.
Your comments show me you just want to put people down. If you did understand anything you would be trying to tell us but your more interested in trying to pretend you are better than everyone else.
That makes you a troll. You might dress it up a bit but that's what your doing. Nothing constructive to say - don't bother commenting...
When you are in a hole stop digging
Why don't you tell us then genius - how does it work? We are all ears, fill us with your new statesman like business acumen...
[quote][p][bold]Get a grip[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Parkstreetshufle[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Get a grip[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Parkstreetshufle[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Get a grip[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Parkstreetshufle[/bold] wrote: The old Next premises if for rent in St Marys street. £1350 per week rent. Im guessing but Id estimate that the business rates are at least half the rent, £700 pw, add electric and phone your looking at the fat end of £2,500 a week just to break even. The council continue to raise rates. Whats the incentive to run a business in town. Its a dead end because infrastructure is not supporting business, its bleeding it dry. Weymouth and Portland is controlled by those that have passed through the system and are not considering those that have yet to do so. Selfish and irresponsible. The entire council, local and county, needs to be gutted from the top floor, like an old building and hire fresh blood. Men and women that have an invested interest in creating a sustainable life in the area, not just a decade or so of reitrement.[/p][/quote]You must understand that the council do not own the shops and have no control over the rents. Business rates are not fixed by the council.[/p][/quote]Of course a realise that - where have I said that the council set rent? Perhaps you would be better to read a response before rushing to point out mistakes. Being a pedant is the new trolling, slightly less offensive, but ultimately pointless and unrewarding for either poster or pedant. Keep your hands in your pockets... Of the consortium owned property in town, the council will certainly advise the owners of the rent level, either directly or through others. The council collect the rates, you can bet your bottom euro they set the rates, they might be covered by government legislation but trying to suggest that the council are just government automatons is ridiculous. The council, just like every other government institution are a collection of people all using the rules to suit, its not a matter of if they do this - just to what extent and who that benefits. Again I come back to my point, at some stage we will need to address the dwindling number of young people and young families. The mentality is to keep Weymouth as a picture postcard. This mentality is killing it. Soon it will be a ghost town like something from Wales. Nobody says you have to forget the past - but you have to embrace the future, and that is not allowing a council composed of very conservative much older people make all the decisions.[/p][/quote]Your comments only show to me that you simply do not understand the whole issues of how rent and rates are calculated.[/p][/quote]Your comments show me you just want to put people down. If you did understand anything you would be trying to tell us but your more interested in trying to pretend you are better than everyone else. That makes you a troll. You might dress it up a bit but that's what your doing. Nothing constructive to say - don't bother commenting...[/p][/quote]When you are in a hole stop digging[/p][/quote]Why don't you tell us then genius - how does it work? We are all ears, fill us with your new statesman like business acumen... Parkstreetshufle
  • Score: -1

2:31pm Wed 12 Mar 14

siriem says...

wowfood wrote:
siriem wrote:
wowfood wrote:
Personally I'd argue that what we need is a larger array of indoor entertainment and eat out places. Dorch has gotten wagamamas, nando, zizis etc, what do we have? A bella pasta and a couple McDs / subways. If a family comes down here on holiday there really aren't that many great places in town for them to eat, aside from getting fish and chips that is. Likewise for locals. If I want to go for a meal with friends / family we wind up in dorch because it's not bella pasta.

Likewise indoor entertainment. We have a load of arcades on the seafront with the same machines they had in there 20 years back. That's about it. Would be nice to have somewhere in town with a kids zone, for younger kids who come here and get rained out. They could probably make one out of the skeleton of the colwell center.

Would also be nice if the weymouth pavillion hired a decent advertiser. I'll ocasionally here wind of something I find interesting through the grapevine, but unless I'm looking I never know what they have there. I know more about what's happening at the Bic than the pavillion so it's no wonder it died and then came back only to risk death a second time.
There are loads of amazing places to eat and drink in Weymouth and I would hate to see any incursion by the microwave jockeys of the high street chains. Il Porto, The Red Lion, Monkey's Fist, Ocean Bistro, Mallams, The Ship, The George Bar & Grill, Vaughn's, Flood 's, Sense, Manbo's, The Dining Room, Enzo's and The Dorset Burger Co are just a few of the fine eating places in Weymouth, not to mention the many excellent fish & chip shops, tea rooms and cafés. In fact the town is spoilt for choice and quality. And you want Nando's? The fact that Flamin' Chooks - a Nando's clone - didn't survive, shows that you're definitely in a minority.
I'm not disputing the number of places to eat, and for a local or somebody who knows somebody local it's great. The problem is the tourists. If you're on holiday though a lot of people will want somewhere familiar, as opposed to local grub from the pub. That's why a few chain stores would be nice...

Okay in all honesty all I want is an Edz and a wagamamas. Possibly a burger king. but still.
Absolutely understand your point about the visitors to Weymouth, but I believe one of the best things about a holiday is doing things that you can't do at home. Why travel halfway across the country to eat a mass produced meal that you could have got in your home town? It's up to us locals - especially the hoteliers - to be recommending places to the holidaymakers. Rather than settling for the familiar, let's get everyone to support our local businesses. Same goes for the shops - it's all very well bemoaning what we don't have, but we should be encouraging the use of what we do have. If we can get the footfall into the town centre, more shops will be encouraged to open and will thrive. I'm not sure I'd want to open a shop in a town that many locals - stupidly in my opinion - haven't got a good thing to say for. I'm a newcomer to Weymouth and I love it. I've lived and worked all over the country but I don't want to leave Weymouth - I think it's a great place! My business is now here - I've invested my time and money into this town and I strongly believe it still has a great future. The closed shops are not indigenous to Weymouth - it's a country wide phenomenon and there are many many places much worse off than we are.
[quote][p][bold]wowfood[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]siriem[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]wowfood[/bold] wrote: Personally I'd argue that what we need is a larger array of indoor entertainment and eat out places. Dorch has gotten wagamamas, nando, zizis etc, what do we have? A bella pasta and a couple McDs / subways. If a family comes down here on holiday there really aren't that many great places in town for them to eat, aside from getting fish and chips that is. Likewise for locals. If I want to go for a meal with friends / family we wind up in dorch because it's not bella pasta. Likewise indoor entertainment. We have a load of arcades on the seafront with the same machines they had in there 20 years back. That's about it. Would be nice to have somewhere in town with a kids zone, for younger kids who come here and get rained out. They could probably make one out of the skeleton of the colwell center. Would also be nice if the weymouth pavillion hired a decent advertiser. I'll ocasionally here wind of something I find interesting through the grapevine, but unless I'm looking I never know what they have there. I know more about what's happening at the Bic than the pavillion so it's no wonder it died and then came back only to risk death a second time.[/p][/quote]There are loads of amazing places to eat and drink in Weymouth and I would hate to see any incursion by the microwave jockeys of the high street chains. Il Porto, The Red Lion, Monkey's Fist, Ocean Bistro, Mallams, The Ship, The George Bar & Grill, Vaughn's, Flood 's, Sense, Manbo's, The Dining Room, Enzo's and The Dorset Burger Co are just a few of the fine eating places in Weymouth, not to mention the many excellent fish & chip shops, tea rooms and cafés. In fact the town is spoilt for choice and quality. And you want Nando's? The fact that Flamin' Chooks - a Nando's clone - didn't survive, shows that you're definitely in a minority.[/p][/quote]I'm not disputing the number of places to eat, and for a local or somebody who knows somebody local it's great. The problem is the tourists. If you're on holiday though a lot of people will want somewhere familiar, as opposed to local grub from the pub. That's why a few chain stores would be nice... Okay in all honesty all I want is an Edz and a wagamamas. Possibly a burger king. but still.[/p][/quote]Absolutely understand your point about the visitors to Weymouth, but I believe one of the best things about a holiday is doing things that you can't do at home. Why travel halfway across the country to eat a mass produced meal that you could have got in your home town? It's up to us locals - especially the hoteliers - to be recommending places to the holidaymakers. Rather than settling for the familiar, let's get everyone to support our local businesses. Same goes for the shops - it's all very well bemoaning what we don't have, but we should be encouraging the use of what we do have. If we can get the footfall into the town centre, more shops will be encouraged to open and will thrive. I'm not sure I'd want to open a shop in a town that many locals - stupidly in my opinion - haven't got a good thing to say for. I'm a newcomer to Weymouth and I love it. I've lived and worked all over the country but I don't want to leave Weymouth - I think it's a great place! My business is now here - I've invested my time and money into this town and I strongly believe it still has a great future. The closed shops are not indigenous to Weymouth - it's a country wide phenomenon and there are many many places much worse off than we are. siriem
  • Score: 5

2:54pm Wed 12 Mar 14

bluehorizon54 says...

catwoman2 wrote:
I avoid shopping in Weymouth due to the ridiculously high parking charges. I can park in Dorchester for two hours for just £1!
I agree everytime I pay to park in Weymouth I feel robbed. Loads of cheaper towns to shop in. Good luck to the council in trying to sort it out. All so the year or to of chaos before the Olympics hasn't done the place any favours. All I remember is sitting in endless traffic jams!!!! However there was hardly any traffic during the games, All those thousands of people must have been hiding{maybe in the empty shops}
[quote][p][bold]catwoman2[/bold] wrote: I avoid shopping in Weymouth due to the ridiculously high parking charges. I can park in Dorchester for two hours for just £1![/p][/quote]I agree everytime I pay to park in Weymouth I feel robbed. Loads of cheaper towns to shop in. Good luck to the council in trying to sort it out. All so the year or to of chaos before the Olympics hasn't done the place any favours. All I remember is sitting in endless traffic jams!!!! However there was hardly any traffic during the games, All those thousands of people must have been hiding{maybe in the empty shops} bluehorizon54
  • Score: 3

12:36am Thu 13 Mar 14

oldbrock says...

"busy bees" and "empty nesters" these people love this politician speak, whats wrong with just wanting to attract "people" per se, then again, it doesn't sound grand enough, also, some visitors might just not come to the area to drag about in shops all day or need something or somebody to constantly "entertain" them? Weymouth is a beautiful place, the area round it is interesting and full of beauty - long may it remain so.
"busy bees" and "empty nesters" these people love this politician speak, whats wrong with just wanting to attract "people" per se, then again, it doesn't sound grand enough, also, some visitors might just not come to the area to drag about in shops all day or need something or somebody to constantly "entertain" them? Weymouth is a beautiful place, the area round it is interesting and full of beauty - long may it remain so. oldbrock
  • Score: 2

7:52pm Thu 13 Mar 14

portlandpete says...

I think the general feeling of most of the comments here about the empty shops in Weymouth by most people is wake up GREEDY LAND LORDS AND COUNCIL if you want to have a busy Weymouth shopping center reduce the rent and rates ,who can afford £18/25k upwards in this economic climate for most shops,make it so that prospective tenants wanting to go in your empty run down shops have a chance to try and make some money for there selves and not just break even after paying the rent and rates and other consumable costs,most will run at a loss in the first year or more only to close again.If the rent etc was achievable Weymouth could get on the map again,instead of losing trade to the surrounding areas.
I think the general feeling of most of the comments here about the empty shops in Weymouth by most people is wake up GREEDY LAND LORDS AND COUNCIL if you want to have a busy Weymouth shopping center reduce the rent and rates ,who can afford £18/25k upwards in this economic climate for most shops,make it so that prospective tenants wanting to go in your empty run down shops have a chance to try and make some money for there selves and not just break even after paying the rent and rates and other consumable costs,most will run at a loss in the first year or more only to close again.If the rent etc was achievable Weymouth could get on the map again,instead of losing trade to the surrounding areas. portlandpete
  • Score: 2

12:28pm Tue 18 Mar 14

weymouth lady says...

Every town has empty shops, take Poole for instance I went there on sunday and Monsoon has even left due to high rents because of greedy landlords, also expensive car parking set by the council puts locals and visitors off.
Every town has empty shops, take Poole for instance I went there on sunday and Monsoon has even left due to high rents because of greedy landlords, also expensive car parking set by the council puts locals and visitors off. weymouth lady
  • Score: 0

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