Serial burglar jailed after stealing tobacco worth £8,214 from Portland store

Dorset Echo: JAILED: Terence Michael Richard Bryant JAILED: Terence Michael Richard Bryant

A SERIAL burglar has been jailed after stealing tobacco worth thousands of pounds from a Portland store.

Terence Michael Richard Bryant aged 29, admitted one count of burglary at Dorchester Crown Court.

Prosecutor Mark Ruffell said the offence took place just weeks after the defendant, of Hillcrest Road, Weymouth, was released from prison.

He told the court that Bryant, together with another offender, went to the Esso Petrol Station in Easton Lane on August 14 last year, smashed the window with a rock and used a duvet cover to make off with tobacco worth £8,124.

Weeks later, again acting with an accomplice, Bryant targeted Portland Borstal Officers Club, where the pair stole £60 cash and eight packets of tobacco, and the Co-operative store in Easton Square, where alcohol worth £700 was taken.

Mr Ruffell said that stolen cars and motorcycles were used by the pair to make their getaway. In mitigation, Nicholas Robinson asked for the two later offences to be taken into consideration.

He told the court that Bryant, who has 37 previous convictions for 79 offences, simply wanted to live a ‘law-abiding life’.

Mr Robinson said: “He clearly is one of those people who most frustrate the court, he does not want to do the things that his record shows time and time again.

“But he has become institutionalised.”

He added: “He was released from prison in August last year with £47 in his pocket. He tried to get work but the answer he repeatedly got was ‘no’.”

Judge Roger Jarvis sentenced Bryant to 20 months in prison.

He said: “There are any number of victims of your behaviour, not only the victims of your crimes but your family are also victims.

“In a sense the lifestyle you have chosen has meant that you have not had the benefit of being out and enjoying the sorts of things the rest of us can.

“All of this because of the way you are consistently committing serious offences.”

He added: “I have at least some sense of relief in learning that you now appreciate you need to work hard to change your lifestyle.”

“Otherwise all you can look forward to is years and years in custody.”

Comments (13)

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7:33am Tue 18 Mar 14

cosmick says...

Only 20 months? With all those convictions 20 years would be more like it.SCUM.
Only 20 months? With all those convictions 20 years would be more like it.SCUM. cosmick
  • Score: 22

2:26pm Tue 18 Mar 14

Tinker2 says...

Unless Probation can work alongside another organisation that can provide real practical support for released offenders, the pattern will not be broken.
It is better, safer, and a lot cheaper, for society to provide solutions. Current reoffending rates can be as high as 75%, something has to change?
Unless Probation can work alongside another organisation that can provide real practical support for released offenders, the pattern will not be broken. It is better, safer, and a lot cheaper, for society to provide solutions. Current reoffending rates can be as high as 75%, something has to change? Tinker2
  • Score: 7

3:02pm Tue 18 Mar 14

elloello1980 says...

another scumbag off the streets. but for only 20months?

I've said it so many times, but Judge Roger Jarvis is clueless in todays world. often believing the rubbish from the defence (the defendant realises he's wrong, blah blah blah) and adding his personal feelings when sentencing

“I have at least some sense of relief in learning that you now appreciate you need to work hard to change your lifestyle.”

Like the last time he come out of prison?
another scumbag off the streets. but for only 20months? I've said it so many times, but Judge Roger Jarvis is clueless in todays world. often believing the rubbish from the defence (the defendant realises he's wrong, blah blah blah) and adding his personal feelings when sentencing “I have at least some sense of relief in learning that you now appreciate you need to work hard to change your lifestyle.” Like the last time he come out of prison? elloello1980
  • Score: 4

3:16pm Tue 18 Mar 14

Sigurd Hoberth says...

Tinker2 wrote:
Unless Probation can work alongside another organisation that can provide real practical support for released offenders, the pattern will not be broken.
It is better, safer, and a lot cheaper, for society to provide solutions. Current reoffending rates can be as high as 75%, something has to change?
The system don't care about men, they simply think locking problems out of sight out of mind is some sort of solution. In our society when a man stops being a good worker drone, human wallet and walking sperm donor, he starts being seen AS a problem, instead of HAVING problems. Our criminal system is a farce and reform is a myth within it. It is little more than a revolving door of social warehousing that allows the various systems not to deal with the issues long before prison is the only option left.

70%* of male inmates have one form of mental illness or another (*prison reform trust),
http://brightonmanpl
an.wordpress.com/201
1/01/12/mentally-ill
-men-still-stuck-in-
victorian-lunatic-as
ylums/

From UKgov docs.
24% have been in social "care" system
29% have been abused in their lives
2% have been in Foster care
27% come from single parent family's.
88%* of homeless are male .

Men on average get 40% more sentence than women for the exact same crimes and are far more likely to go to prison at all, for the same crime.
http://www.avoicefor
men.com/mens-rights/
uk-mp-takes-a-stand-
for-male-prisoners/
[quote][p][bold]Tinker2[/bold] wrote: Unless Probation can work alongside another organisation that can provide real practical support for released offenders, the pattern will not be broken. It is better, safer, and a lot cheaper, for society to provide solutions. Current reoffending rates can be as high as 75%, something has to change?[/p][/quote]The system don't care about men, they simply think locking problems out of sight out of mind is some sort of solution. In our society when a man stops being a good worker drone, human wallet and walking sperm donor, he starts being seen AS a problem, instead of HAVING problems. Our criminal system is a farce and reform is a myth within it. It is little more than a revolving door of social warehousing that allows the various systems not to deal with the issues long before prison is the only option left. 70%* of male inmates have one form of mental illness or another (*prison reform trust), http://brightonmanpl an.wordpress.com/201 1/01/12/mentally-ill -men-still-stuck-in- victorian-lunatic-as ylums/ From UKgov docs. 24% have been in social "care" system 29% have been abused in their lives 2% have been in Foster care 27% come from single parent family's. 88%* of homeless are male . Men on average get 40% more sentence than women for the exact same crimes and are far more likely to go to prison at all, for the same crime. http://www.avoicefor men.com/mens-rights/ uk-mp-takes-a-stand- for-male-prisoners/ Sigurd Hoberth
  • Score: 2

4:50pm Tue 18 Mar 14

woodsedge says...

elloello1980 wrote:
another scumbag off the streets. but for only 20months?

I've said it so many times, but Judge Roger Jarvis is clueless in todays world. often believing the rubbish from the defence (the defendant realises he's wrong, blah blah blah) and adding his personal feelings when sentencing

“I have at least some sense of relief in learning that you now appreciate you need to work hard to change your lifestyle.”

Like the last time he come out of prison?
Quite agree with you elloello1980, far to lenient on low life. We have freedom of choice in this country and if someone makes a conscious choice to break the law, then they have to face the consequences. 20 months is not enough and the 20 months he has got will be considerably shortened and he will be out committing more crimes in next to no time. Leave them to rot in prison where they can exchange stories on how hard done by they are.
[quote][p][bold]elloello1980[/bold] wrote: another scumbag off the streets. but for only 20months? I've said it so many times, but Judge Roger Jarvis is clueless in todays world. often believing the rubbish from the defence (the defendant realises he's wrong, blah blah blah) and adding his personal feelings when sentencing “I have at least some sense of relief in learning that you now appreciate you need to work hard to change your lifestyle.” Like the last time he come out of prison?[/p][/quote]Quite agree with you elloello1980, far to lenient on low life. We have freedom of choice in this country and if someone makes a conscious choice to break the law, then they have to face the consequences. 20 months is not enough and the 20 months he has got will be considerably shortened and he will be out committing more crimes in next to no time. Leave them to rot in prison where they can exchange stories on how hard done by they are. woodsedge
  • Score: -1

4:58pm Tue 18 Mar 14

cosmick says...

Sigurd Hoberth wrote:
Tinker2 wrote:
Unless Probation can work alongside another organisation that can provide real practical support for released offenders, the pattern will not be broken.
It is better, safer, and a lot cheaper, for society to provide solutions. Current reoffending rates can be as high as 75%, something has to change?
The system don't care about men, they simply think locking problems out of sight out of mind is some sort of solution. In our society when a man stops being a good worker drone, human wallet and walking sperm donor, he starts being seen AS a problem, instead of HAVING problems. Our criminal system is a farce and reform is a myth within it. It is little more than a revolving door of social warehousing that allows the various systems not to deal with the issues long before prison is the only option left.

70%* of male inmates have one form of mental illness or another (*prison reform trust),
http://brightonmanpl

an.wordpress.com/201

1/01/12/mentally-ill

-men-still-stuck-in-

victorian-lunatic-as

ylums/

From UKgov docs.
24% have been in social "care" system
29% have been abused in their lives
2% have been in Foster care
27% come from single parent family's.
88%* of homeless are male .

Men on average get 40% more sentence than women for the exact same crimes and are far more likely to go to prison at all, for the same crime.
http://www.avoicefor

men.com/mens-rights/

uk-mp-takes-a-stand-

for-male-prisoners/
So the problem is, Problem Familys. Just an excuse plenty of people get out of the gutter, others choose to stay there. Who pays we do.
[quote][p][bold]Sigurd Hoberth[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Tinker2[/bold] wrote: Unless Probation can work alongside another organisation that can provide real practical support for released offenders, the pattern will not be broken. It is better, safer, and a lot cheaper, for society to provide solutions. Current reoffending rates can be as high as 75%, something has to change?[/p][/quote]The system don't care about men, they simply think locking problems out of sight out of mind is some sort of solution. In our society when a man stops being a good worker drone, human wallet and walking sperm donor, he starts being seen AS a problem, instead of HAVING problems. Our criminal system is a farce and reform is a myth within it. It is little more than a revolving door of social warehousing that allows the various systems not to deal with the issues long before prison is the only option left. 70%* of male inmates have one form of mental illness or another (*prison reform trust), http://brightonmanpl an.wordpress.com/201 1/01/12/mentally-ill -men-still-stuck-in- victorian-lunatic-as ylums/ From UKgov docs. 24% have been in social "care" system 29% have been abused in their lives 2% have been in Foster care 27% come from single parent family's. 88%* of homeless are male . Men on average get 40% more sentence than women for the exact same crimes and are far more likely to go to prison at all, for the same crime. http://www.avoicefor men.com/mens-rights/ uk-mp-takes-a-stand- for-male-prisoners/[/p][/quote]So the problem is, Problem Familys. Just an excuse plenty of people get out of the gutter, others choose to stay there. Who pays we do. cosmick
  • Score: -2

7:43pm Tue 18 Mar 14

I'mavoter says...

Make the sentence mean the sentence, and not half of it. Given 20 months, serve 20 months. Re -offend within 3 years, then minimum sentence automatically 5 years. Make it less like a holiday camp too, ... No TV, no computers, no visits., no pocket money. Then watch the repeat offenders decrease.
Make the sentence mean the sentence, and not half of it. Given 20 months, serve 20 months. Re -offend within 3 years, then minimum sentence automatically 5 years. Make it less like a holiday camp too, ... No TV, no computers, no visits., no pocket money. Then watch the repeat offenders decrease. I'mavoter
  • Score: 1

7:56pm Tue 18 Mar 14

JackJohnson says...

Time we starting using three strikes sentencing. After the third conviction they're unlikely to be rehabilitated, so lock 'em up and throw away the key. Cheaper to do that than let them roam the streets.
Time we starting using three strikes sentencing. After the third conviction they're unlikely to be rehabilitated, so lock 'em up and throw away the key. Cheaper to do that than let them roam the streets. JackJohnson
  • Score: 1

10:18pm Tue 18 Mar 14

Tinker2 says...

I'mavoter wrote:
Make the sentence mean the sentence, and not half of it. Given 20 months, serve 20 months. Re -offend within 3 years, then minimum sentence automatically 5 years. Make it less like a holiday camp too, ... No TV, no computers, no visits., no pocket money. Then watch the repeat offenders decrease.
Locking people up, for many, has been shown not to be a deterent. It does not break the cycle of their behavour and the repeat offending. Locking them up for longer makes no difference.
Address the problem and give the offender some further education, some new work skills with recognised qualifications and inside work experience.
At the same time tackle any drink or drug issues.
Turn the thing around, give the offender a chance and some tools needed, to stand a chance of a new start on release.
[quote][p][bold]I'mavoter[/bold] wrote: Make the sentence mean the sentence, and not half of it. Given 20 months, serve 20 months. Re -offend within 3 years, then minimum sentence automatically 5 years. Make it less like a holiday camp too, ... No TV, no computers, no visits., no pocket money. Then watch the repeat offenders decrease.[/p][/quote]Locking people up, for many, has been shown not to be a deterent. It does not break the cycle of their behavour and the repeat offending. Locking them up for longer makes no difference. Address the problem and give the offender some further education, some new work skills with recognised qualifications and inside work experience. At the same time tackle any drink or drug issues. Turn the thing around, give the offender a chance and some tools needed, to stand a chance of a new start on release. Tinker2
  • Score: 2

8:35am Wed 19 Mar 14

woodsedge says...

Tinker2 wrote:
I'mavoter wrote:
Make the sentence mean the sentence, and not half of it. Given 20 months, serve 20 months. Re -offend within 3 years, then minimum sentence automatically 5 years. Make it less like a holiday camp too, ... No TV, no computers, no visits., no pocket money. Then watch the repeat offenders decrease.
Locking people up, for many, has been shown not to be a deterent. It does not break the cycle of their behavour and the repeat offending. Locking them up for longer makes no difference.
Address the problem and give the offender some further education, some new work skills with recognised qualifications and inside work experience.
At the same time tackle any drink or drug issues.
Turn the thing around, give the offender a chance and some tools needed, to stand a chance of a new start on release.
I agree that rehabilitation should be a big part of any prison sentence as well as rehab offered for those that want to change. That said the old saying that 'you can take a horse to water but you cannot make it drink is also true. This character had 37 previous convictions for 79 offences so it's not like he has not had the opportunity to ponder on making changes! As for the only having £47 in his pocket, does that give us all the excuse at the end of the month to commit crime to make ends meet?
[quote][p][bold]Tinker2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]I'mavoter[/bold] wrote: Make the sentence mean the sentence, and not half of it. Given 20 months, serve 20 months. Re -offend within 3 years, then minimum sentence automatically 5 years. Make it less like a holiday camp too, ... No TV, no computers, no visits., no pocket money. Then watch the repeat offenders decrease.[/p][/quote]Locking people up, for many, has been shown not to be a deterent. It does not break the cycle of their behavour and the repeat offending. Locking them up for longer makes no difference. Address the problem and give the offender some further education, some new work skills with recognised qualifications and inside work experience. At the same time tackle any drink or drug issues. Turn the thing around, give the offender a chance and some tools needed, to stand a chance of a new start on release.[/p][/quote]I agree that rehabilitation should be a big part of any prison sentence as well as rehab offered for those that want to change. That said the old saying that 'you can take a horse to water but you cannot make it drink is also true. This character had 37 previous convictions for 79 offences so it's not like he has not had the opportunity to ponder on making changes! As for the only having £47 in his pocket, does that give us all the excuse at the end of the month to commit crime to make ends meet? woodsedge
  • Score: 4

8:02pm Wed 19 Mar 14

fraggle36 says...

I met this individual about 9 years ago. I visited him at Portland YOI after receiving his application for accommodation upon release. He was a likeable character and I took a risk and offered him the accommodation; believing I was giving him a chance to find his feet. Within an extremely short period of time he was being accused of burglary. He proclaimed his innocence but suggested he would plead guilty as he would be sent to "big boy's prison". He was fed up of mixing with boys. It seems mixing with the big boys did him no favours. Disappointing
I met this individual about 9 years ago. I visited him at Portland YOI after receiving his application for accommodation upon release. He was a likeable character and I took a risk and offered him the accommodation; believing I was giving him a chance to find his feet. Within an extremely short period of time he was being accused of burglary. He proclaimed his innocence but suggested he would plead guilty as he would be sent to "big boy's prison". He was fed up of mixing with boys. It seems mixing with the big boys did him no favours. Disappointing fraggle36
  • Score: 0

8:12pm Wed 19 Mar 14

JackJohnson says...

fraggle36 wrote:
I met this individual about 9 years ago. I visited him at Portland YOI after receiving his application for accommodation upon release. He was a likeable character and I took a risk and offered him the accommodation; believing I was giving him a chance to find his feet. Within an extremely short period of time he was being accused of burglary. He proclaimed his innocence but suggested he would plead guilty as he would be sent to "big boy's prison". He was fed up of mixing with boys. It seems mixing with the big boys did him no favours. Disappointing
He'll be fine - somebody will have taken him under their wing as their ****.
[quote][p][bold]fraggle36[/bold] wrote: I met this individual about 9 years ago. I visited him at Portland YOI after receiving his application for accommodation upon release. He was a likeable character and I took a risk and offered him the accommodation; believing I was giving him a chance to find his feet. Within an extremely short period of time he was being accused of burglary. He proclaimed his innocence but suggested he would plead guilty as he would be sent to "big boy's prison". He was fed up of mixing with boys. It seems mixing with the big boys did him no favours. Disappointing[/p][/quote]He'll be fine - somebody will have taken him under their wing as their ****. JackJohnson
  • Score: 0

8:13pm Wed 19 Mar 14

JackJohnson says...

JackJohnson wrote:
fraggle36 wrote:
I met this individual about 9 years ago. I visited him at Portland YOI after receiving his application for accommodation upon release. He was a likeable character and I took a risk and offered him the accommodation; believing I was giving him a chance to find his feet. Within an extremely short period of time he was being accused of burglary. He proclaimed his innocence but suggested he would plead guilty as he would be sent to "big boy's prison". He was fed up of mixing with boys. It seems mixing with the big boys did him no favours. Disappointing
He'll be fine - somebody will have taken him under their wing as their ****.
(b-i-t-c-h).
[quote][p][bold]JackJohnson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]fraggle36[/bold] wrote: I met this individual about 9 years ago. I visited him at Portland YOI after receiving his application for accommodation upon release. He was a likeable character and I took a risk and offered him the accommodation; believing I was giving him a chance to find his feet. Within an extremely short period of time he was being accused of burglary. He proclaimed his innocence but suggested he would plead guilty as he would be sent to "big boy's prison". He was fed up of mixing with boys. It seems mixing with the big boys did him no favours. Disappointing[/p][/quote]He'll be fine - somebody will have taken him under their wing as their ****.[/p][/quote](b-i-t-c-h). JackJohnson
  • Score: 0

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