Police carry out road safety blitz in Dorchester

Police carry out road safety blitz in Dorchester

Police carry out road safety blitz in Dorchester

First published in News
Last updated

POLICE have been cracking down on motorists committing the ‘fatal four’ driving offences in Dorchester.

Officers were in the town centre this morning in a targeted operation aimed at raising awareness of the most common causes of road accidents and promoting road safety.

The ‘fatal four’ offences of speeding, drink or drug driving, using mobile phone while driving and failing to wear a seatbelt are known to be the main causes of injuries or deaths on the roads.

The operation led by the county town’s Safer Neighbourhood Team saw spotters posted at either end of High East and High West Street to alert officers positioned at North Square of any motorists suspected of committing an offence.

Anyone found to be flouting road traffic laws was then pulled over and given education and advice by police or issued with fixed penalty notices.

The initiative was also designed to enforce the message of the No Excuse road safety campaign that has been running across Dorset over recent years.

PC Mike Brown said: “It’s about looking at the ‘fatal four’ and to tie in with the No Excuse Campaign.

“We have identified that the risk of road deaths increase when people are using mobile phones, not wearing seatbelts, speeding and so on and we are looking out for these things.

“We are then giving them some education about why we ask people not to use mobile phones and to wear seatbelts for their own safety and the safety of other road users.”

He added: “It’s all about raising awareness and educating people and there also needs to be enforcement through penalty tickets or referring people to driver awareness courses for further education.”

A number of vehicles were stopped during the operation, which lasted for an hour and a half, and PCSO Glen Caddy said that a total of nine tickets were issued.

Most of the offending motorists were pulled over for seatbelt and mobile phone offences.

The number of penalty notices issued represented a significant drop since the last time a similar operation was carried out in the town around two years ago suggesting the road safety message was getting through to motorists.

However, PCSO Caddy said that the fact motorists were still committing offences showed that police efforts to educate drivers and raise awareness needed to continue.

He said: “There is still work to be done.”

Comments (14)

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1:18pm Tue 18 Mar 14

JamesYoung says...

One noted definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result. Assuming that the aim here is not revenue generation, then i would suggest that driver education is not working and another solution is needed. Mandatory fitting of "black box" type trackers, which record acceleration, speed and GPS position, would be one way of dealing with the problem of excess speed. Mandatory licence loss for drivers using mobiles would deal with this problem. As for seat belts, well, to be honest, that's Darwinism in action and should be encouraged not prevented.
One noted definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result. Assuming that the aim here is not revenue generation, then i would suggest that driver education is not working and another solution is needed. Mandatory fitting of "black box" type trackers, which record acceleration, speed and GPS position, would be one way of dealing with the problem of excess speed. Mandatory licence loss for drivers using mobiles would deal with this problem. As for seat belts, well, to be honest, that's Darwinism in action and should be encouraged not prevented. JamesYoung
  • Score: -8

1:39pm Tue 18 Mar 14

JackJohnson says...

Driver education only works with drivers who do not need it. Those that do need it will continue to break the rules if they think they will not get caught and penalised.

A mandatory black box might be a good idea for repeat offenders (e.g. after a ban for accruing more than 12 points on your licence - sentence to a black box for 5 yesrs after the driving ban). This might be an incentive that insurance companies could enforce at little or no cost to law abiding motorists. At renewal (monthly for those with a black box) the insurance company could analyze the driver's performance and calulate the next month's premium based on how the driver is behaving.
Driver education only works with drivers who do not need it. Those that do need it will continue to break the rules if they think they will not get caught and penalised. A mandatory black box might be a good idea for repeat offenders (e.g. after a ban for accruing more than 12 points on your licence - sentence to a black box for 5 yesrs after the driving ban). This might be an incentive that insurance companies could enforce at little or no cost to law abiding motorists. At renewal (monthly for those with a black box) the insurance company could analyze the driver's performance and calulate the next month's premium based on how the driver is behaving. JackJohnson
  • Score: 10

1:55pm Tue 18 Mar 14

maximan says...

Our local law enforcers don't want to ban anyone...there's no financial benfit to be made by banning drivers. Just keep fining them and keep topping up that budget...
Our local law enforcers don't want to ban anyone...there's no financial benfit to be made by banning drivers. Just keep fining them and keep topping up that budget... maximan
  • Score: 0

2:24pm Tue 18 Mar 14

acop40 says...

JamesYoung wrote:
One noted definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result. Assuming that the aim here is not revenue generation, then i would suggest that driver education is not working and another solution is needed. Mandatory fitting of "black box" type trackers, which record acceleration, speed and GPS position, would be one way of dealing with the problem of excess speed. Mandatory licence loss for drivers using mobiles would deal with this problem. As for seat belts, well, to be honest, that's Darwinism in action and should be encouraged not prevented.
love it
[quote][p][bold]JamesYoung[/bold] wrote: One noted definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result. Assuming that the aim here is not revenue generation, then i would suggest that driver education is not working and another solution is needed. Mandatory fitting of "black box" type trackers, which record acceleration, speed and GPS position, would be one way of dealing with the problem of excess speed. Mandatory licence loss for drivers using mobiles would deal with this problem. As for seat belts, well, to be honest, that's Darwinism in action and should be encouraged not prevented.[/p][/quote]love it acop40
  • Score: -4

4:41pm Tue 18 Mar 14

woodsedge says...

This as nothing to do with policing and all to do with raising revenue.
This as nothing to do with policing and all to do with raising revenue. woodsedge
  • Score: 6

4:59pm Tue 18 Mar 14

bargain price says...

They need to do out of the towns, that's where most crimes. There mine even catch one of there own as the amount of police officers driving doing other thinks like eating ice cream or on the phone
They need to do out of the towns, that's where most crimes. There mine even catch one of there own as the amount of police officers driving doing other thinks like eating ice cream or on the phone bargain price
  • Score: 0

5:29pm Tue 18 Mar 14

Phaedrus says...

It has been found in studies of motivation that exhortation and threats eventually cease to work.
I'd love to see them doing something about those who drive too close to the car in front.
It has been found in studies of motivation that exhortation and threats eventually cease to work. I'd love to see them doing something about those who drive too close to the car in front. Phaedrus
  • Score: 5

7:22pm Tue 18 Mar 14

ksmain says...

JamesYoung wrote:
One noted definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result. Assuming that the aim here is not revenue generation, then i would suggest that driver education is not working and another solution is needed. Mandatory fitting of "black box" type trackers, which record acceleration, speed and GPS position, would be one way of dealing with the problem of excess speed. Mandatory licence loss for drivers using mobiles would deal with this problem. As for seat belts, well, to be honest, that's Darwinism in action and should be encouraged not prevented.
Agree totally.

As one person has also said here - education on traffic road offences only works with the law-abiding who are likely to break the rules and feel so mortified they are unlikely to do it again. It doesn't work with the other ignoramoses who will knowingly repeat offend. Tougher penalties are needed here - with I would suggest, an increasing scale for each offence committed until these repeat offenders are driven from the road and whose working life is impeded by not being able to drive.
[quote][p][bold]JamesYoung[/bold] wrote: One noted definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result. Assuming that the aim here is not revenue generation, then i would suggest that driver education is not working and another solution is needed. Mandatory fitting of "black box" type trackers, which record acceleration, speed and GPS position, would be one way of dealing with the problem of excess speed. Mandatory licence loss for drivers using mobiles would deal with this problem. As for seat belts, well, to be honest, that's Darwinism in action and should be encouraged not prevented.[/p][/quote]Agree totally. As one person has also said here - education on traffic road offences only works with the law-abiding who are likely to break the rules and feel so mortified they are unlikely to do it again. It doesn't work with the other ignoramoses who will knowingly repeat offend. Tougher penalties are needed here - with I would suggest, an increasing scale for each offence committed until these repeat offenders are driven from the road and whose working life is impeded by not being able to drive. ksmain
  • Score: -2

9:38pm Tue 18 Mar 14

dorsetspeed says...

These operations are just money making. You can even find evidence of this in Dorset Road Unsafe's own reports:

"BA confirmed that obtaining resources and finance is difficult. After review and discussions it has been decided that there will be a series of mini SAT operations between April and the end of June"

http://www.dorsetroa
dsafe.org.uk/images/
Documents/Minutes/Op
GrpMeetings/Op%20Gro
up%20Meeting%2009-04
-13.pdf

And driver error is the biggest factor in road deaths and serious injuries. None of Dorset's "Fatal four", which are actually the most "easily detected and prosecuted four"
These operations are just money making. You can even find evidence of this in Dorset Road Unsafe's own reports: "BA confirmed that obtaining resources and finance is difficult. After review and discussions it has been decided that there will be a series of mini SAT operations between April and the end of June" http://www.dorsetroa dsafe.org.uk/images/ Documents/Minutes/Op GrpMeetings/Op%20Gro up%20Meeting%2009-04 -13.pdf And driver error is the biggest factor in road deaths and serious injuries. None of Dorset's "Fatal four", which are actually the most "easily detected and prosecuted four" dorsetspeed
  • Score: 3

11:14pm Tue 18 Mar 14

K9 says...

Good work guys, keep it up. Very annoying to have to evade another driver who is on their mobile, navigating a roundabout one-handed. From my observations, it's mostly white-van-man or young women.

A middle-aged woman passed me at a give-way line, I pulled out after her, at the next junction, she turned right and half passed over the pavement, not clipped the kerb but fully mounted it and only just missed the garden wall. Next turning, she turned right again and parked. She lived there. On the bloody mobile the whole time.
Good work guys, keep it up. Very annoying to have to evade another driver who is on their mobile, navigating a roundabout one-handed. From my observations, it's mostly white-van-man or young women. A middle-aged woman passed me at a give-way line, I pulled out after her, at the next junction, she turned right and half passed over the pavement, not clipped the kerb but fully mounted it and only just missed the garden wall. Next turning, she turned right again and parked. She lived there. On the bloody mobile the whole time. K9
  • Score: 6

6:38am Wed 19 Mar 14

TenBobDylanThomasHardy says...

I'm glad there are so many perfect drivers in the county.
Also, can you please provide a reference for;
'One noted definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result' It's not in my OED.
Thanks.
I'm glad there are so many perfect drivers in the county. Also, can you please provide a reference for; 'One noted definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result' It's not in my OED. Thanks. TenBobDylanThomasHardy
  • Score: 2

7:19am Wed 19 Mar 14

dorsetspeed says...

K9 wrote:
Good work guys, keep it up. Very annoying to have to evade another driver who is on their mobile, navigating a roundabout one-handed. From my observations, it's mostly white-van-man or young women.

A middle-aged woman passed me at a give-way line, I pulled out after her, at the next junction, she turned right and half passed over the pavement, not clipped the kerb but fully mounted it and only just missed the garden wall. Next turning, she turned right again and parked. She lived there. On the bloody mobile the whole time.
So is "no excuse" working or not?
[quote][p][bold]K9[/bold] wrote: Good work guys, keep it up. Very annoying to have to evade another driver who is on their mobile, navigating a roundabout one-handed. From my observations, it's mostly white-van-man or young women. A middle-aged woman passed me at a give-way line, I pulled out after her, at the next junction, she turned right and half passed over the pavement, not clipped the kerb but fully mounted it and only just missed the garden wall. Next turning, she turned right again and parked. She lived there. On the bloody mobile the whole time.[/p][/quote]So is "no excuse" working or not? dorsetspeed
  • Score: 2

10:10am Wed 19 Mar 14

K9 says...

@dorsetspeed: Yes, I'd say so, this was some years ago in Dorset.
@dorsetspeed: Yes, I'd say so, this was some years ago in Dorset. K9
  • Score: 0

11:44am Wed 19 Mar 14

slayerofsacredcows says...

using Mobiles and driving too close or aggressively are the major causes of accidents, apart from sheer incompetence. Speed and not wearing a seatbelt increase the severity of accidents rather than causing them.

Cameras only trap the unwary or strangers, who have missed one of the ever changing speed limit signs (50, then 30 then 40 then back to 30, all in the space of half a mile). White van man & "Boy Racer" know where they are, so drive up at 60, brake through the camera zone, then accelerate back to 60 again!

A stretch of the Bournemouth bypass was reduced in the last year or so for no other "Road Safety" reason than they weren't catching enough people.
using Mobiles and driving too close or aggressively are the major causes of accidents, apart from sheer incompetence. Speed and not wearing a seatbelt increase the severity of accidents rather than causing them. Cameras only trap the unwary or strangers, who have missed one of the ever changing speed limit signs (50, then 30 then 40 then back to 30, all in the space of half a mile). White van man & "Boy Racer" know where they are, so drive up at 60, brake through the camera zone, then accelerate back to 60 again! A stretch of the Bournemouth bypass was reduced in the last year or so for no other "Road Safety" reason than they weren't catching enough people. slayerofsacredcows
  • Score: 2

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