Teachers' strike - see which schools are open and closed across Dorset

Dorset Echo: Teachers' strike - see which schools are open and closed across Dorset Teachers' strike - see which schools are open and closed across Dorset

TEACHERS are set to strike across Dorset causing disruption to some schools.

Members of the National Union of Teachers (NUT) will strike today in a dispute with the government over working conditions, pay and pensions.

Here is a list of all the schools in the area and whether they will be open, closed or partially closed. (This list is correct as of Tuesday, March 25 at 4pm and may be updated.)

OPEN

Broadmayne First School, Broadmayne

Chickerell Primary School, Chickerell, Weymouth

St Andrew’s School, Littlemoor Road, Preston, Weymouth

Beechcroft St Paul's Primary School, Westham, Weymouth

Bincombe Valley School, Littlemoor, Weymouth

• Holy Trinity Primary School, Cross Road, Weymouth (Currently they are predicting they will be open, this could change on Wednesday.)

Radipole Primary School, Radipole Lane, Weymouth

• St Augustines Primary School, Hardy Avenue, Weymouth

St John's Primary School, Coombe Avenue, Weymouth

Wyke Regis Infant School, Wyke Regis, Weymouth

Portesham Primary School, Portesham

• Thornlow Prep School, Connaught Road, Weymouth

• Westfield Arts College, Littlemoor Road, Preston

Manor Park First School, Dorchester

Prince of Wales School, Dorchester

St Mary's Catholic First School, Dorchester

Puddletown First School, Puddletown • Frome Valley First School, Crossways

Greenford Primary School, Maiden Newton

Cerne Abbas First School, Cerne Abbas

Cheselbourne Village School, Cheselbourne, Dorchester

Buckland Newton Primary School, Buckland Newton

Thorner's Primary School, Litton Cheney, Dorchester

Piddle Valley First School, Piddletrenthide, Dorchester

Winterbourne Valley First School, Winterbourne Abbas, Dorchester

• St Mary's First School, Charminster

• Sunninghill Prep School in Dorchester

• St Mary’s C of E Middle School, Puddletown

• Weymouth College, Weymouth

• IPACA, Portland

• All Saints School, Weymouth

• Kingston Maurward School, Dorchester

• Beaminster School

• St Mary's Beaminster - open but some classes may be disrupted.

• Salway Ash

• Burton Bradstock

• Powerstock

• Symondsbury

• Thorner's School, Litton Cheney

• Charmouth School • St Michael's Lyme Regis

• Thorncombe St Mary's

• Marshwood

• Parrett and Axe Mosterton

• Loders

PARTIALLY OPEN

• Budmouth College: If a strike occurs, Years 7,8,9 and 10 will not be in school, but Years 11,12,13 and 14 will be.

Thomas Hardye School: If a strike occurs, Years 9,10 and 11 will not be in school, but Year's 12 and 13 will be.

• Wey Valley School: If the strike takes place, the school will be closed for Year's 7-10, Year 11 will go in.

• St Nicholas and St Lawrence- Two classes won’t be in but the rest will be.

St George’s Primary School, Portland- Three classes won’t be in, but the rest will be.

• Milborne St Andrew First School, Milborne St Andrew– Two classes -reception and year 4 - will be shut but rest of them will be as normal

• The Dorchester Learning Centre, Dorchester – Partly open dependent on individual student’s timetables

• Sir John Colfox School, Bridport - open for Years 7,8,11,12,13, but closed to Years 9 and 10.

• Woodroffe School in Lyme Regis – Open- but Year 10 and 11 will not be in, but the rest of the school will be in as normal.

CLOSED

Southill Primary School, Sycamore Road, Weymouth

Conifers Primary School, Radipole Lane, Weymouth

• Wyke Regis Junior School, Weymouth

Damers First School, Dorchester

• Dorchester Middle School, Dorchester

• St Osmunds C of E Middle School, Dorchester

• Mountjoy School

• Bridport Primary

• St Catherine's Bridport

Comments (12)

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10:14pm Tue 25 Mar 14

Hunter4 says...

I am fully supportive of teachers standing up to this government in repect of pay & conditions and they have been left with no choice but to strike which unfortunately will effect thouands of children throughout the UK.
With this in mind I recently asked our school to take our children out of term time for a family wedding next year but we were told we could not as it would effect the childs education!
Isn't your strike action doing the same?! I am in support of you but please don't have double standards. Ooh the irony!
I am fully supportive of teachers standing up to this government in repect of pay & conditions and they have been left with no choice but to strike which unfortunately will effect thouands of children throughout the UK. With this in mind I recently asked our school to take our children out of term time for a family wedding next year but we were told we could not as it would effect the childs education! Isn't your strike action doing the same?! I am in support of you but please don't have double standards. Ooh the irony! Hunter4
  • Score: 14

3:19pm Wed 26 Mar 14

slayerofsacredcows says...

How many of you only work 40 weeks a year. The 12 weeks off makes up for the long working week in term time. It is after all a fairly sedentary occupation, not like roofing or bricklaying!
How many of you only work 40 weeks a year. The 12 weeks off makes up for the long working week in term time. It is after all a fairly sedentary occupation, not like roofing or bricklaying! slayerofsacredcows
  • Score: 2

3:52pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Mrs Grumps says...

I am a self-employed music teacher who has lost a lesson today because the young mother who is my student had to look after her children. I had more than a week's notice and had to let her off payment as it is in my terms and conditions that I state when students start with me. I was not able to fill the gap and replace that money. How many self-employed parents have lost money because of this strike?

The trouble with teachers is that most of them have gone from school to university to school and have no grasp of the real world?

12 weeks holiday a year should more than make up for anything!
I am a self-employed music teacher who has lost a lesson today because the young mother who is my student had to look after her children. I had more than a week's notice and had to let her off payment as it is in my terms and conditions that I state when students start with me. I was not able to fill the gap and replace that money. How many self-employed parents have lost money because of this strike? The trouble with teachers is that most of them have gone from school to university to school and have no grasp of the real world? 12 weeks holiday a year should more than make up for anything! Mrs Grumps
  • Score: 6

4:54pm Wed 26 Mar 14

osmington4 says...

Well what`s the problem now? if anyone actually knew what these so called bunch of professionals were striking about we could try and support them.......but as per usual, and also coinciding with their unpublished pay when advertising for job vacancies etc, nobody knows what the problem is.
Well what`s the problem now? if anyone actually knew what these so called bunch of professionals were striking about we could try and support them.......but as per usual, and also coinciding with their unpublished pay when advertising for job vacancies etc, nobody knows what the problem is. osmington4
  • Score: 0

5:52pm Wed 26 Mar 14

stevieboy says...

My wife is a primary school teacher. The only way she can keep on top of all the changes, new directives from Michael Gove, plan lessons, mark, attend meetings etc , oh and teach lessons that inspire children to learn is to arrive at school by 7.30am, work through her lunch hour an d not leave school until at least 6pm and then spend 3hrs per night with more work plus 6hrs at the weekend. That's 65 hrs plus. As for long holidays, more work to catch up. There is no way she can keep that up until she is 68. I would like some quality of life with her.
My wife is a primary school teacher. The only way she can keep on top of all the changes, new directives from Michael Gove, plan lessons, mark, attend meetings etc , oh and teach lessons that inspire children to learn is to arrive at school by 7.30am, work through her lunch hour an d not leave school until at least 6pm and then spend 3hrs per night with more work plus 6hrs at the weekend. That's 65 hrs plus. As for long holidays, more work to catch up. There is no way she can keep that up until she is 68. I would like some quality of life with her. stevieboy
  • Score: 4

6:33pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Sparticles says...

Don't forget stevie that out of those 65 hours a week that she works, she only gets paid for 32.5 of them. That's 39 weeks unpaid a year. Maybe that puts the 13 week holiday into perspective. Unfortunately most people are unaware of the hours that teachers put in preferring to believe we go home at 3:30 and put our feet up.
Don't forget stevie that out of those 65 hours a week that she works, she only gets paid for 32.5 of them. That's 39 weeks unpaid a year. Maybe that puts the 13 week holiday into perspective. Unfortunately most people are unaware of the hours that teachers put in preferring to believe we go home at 3:30 and put our feet up. Sparticles
  • Score: 4

6:50pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Rugbygirl1979 says...

slayerofsacredcows wrote:
How many of you only work 40 weeks a year. The 12 weeks off makes up for the long working week in term time. It is after all a fairly sedentary occupation, not like roofing or bricklaying!
Sedentary? Teachers spend 5 hours per day on their feet basically performing a show everyday. Now while this may not be as physical as bricklaying it is demanding mentally. But as usual the news is only full of pay and pensions. Many teachers, including myself are more than prepared to work till we are 70. It just won't be in teaching. We need someone who actually understands children and education in office. Oh one more thing most teachers work the bulk of the holidays to ensure children have a fun and engaging education. We could just teach from text books. Would make planning and marking much easier. Mr Gove wouldn't be happy though!
[quote][p][bold]slayerofsacredcows[/bold] wrote: How many of you only work 40 weeks a year. The 12 weeks off makes up for the long working week in term time. It is after all a fairly sedentary occupation, not like roofing or bricklaying![/p][/quote]Sedentary? Teachers spend 5 hours per day on their feet basically performing a show everyday. Now while this may not be as physical as bricklaying it is demanding mentally. But as usual the news is only full of pay and pensions. Many teachers, including myself are more than prepared to work till we are 70. It just won't be in teaching. We need someone who actually understands children and education in office. Oh one more thing most teachers work the bulk of the holidays to ensure children have a fun and engaging education. We could just teach from text books. Would make planning and marking much easier. Mr Gove wouldn't be happy though! Rugbygirl1979
  • Score: -2

7:37pm Wed 26 Mar 14

caz maz says...

When I take my son to school in the morning I often see teachers arriving at the same time (about 8,45) and when I collect him again I see teachers leaving the school (3,30 to 3,40), I'm not saying all teachers do them hours but some do. I think this must show in there work and teaching. I can not support teachers of the higher years striking today when exams are just over a month away, they have put them selves above the needs of the pupils and there futures and its that type of teacher this country could live without!
When I take my son to school in the morning I often see teachers arriving at the same time (about 8,45) and when I collect him again I see teachers leaving the school (3,30 to 3,40), I'm not saying all teachers do them hours but some do. I think this must show in there work and teaching. I can not support teachers of the higher years striking today when exams are just over a month away, they have put them selves above the needs of the pupils and there futures and its that type of teacher this country could live without! caz maz
  • Score: 1

8:39pm Wed 26 Mar 14

ksmain says...

Hunter4 wrote:
I am fully supportive of teachers standing up to this government in repect of pay & conditions and they have been left with no choice but to strike which unfortunately will effect thouands of children throughout the UK.
With this in mind I recently asked our school to take our children out of term time for a family wedding next year but we were told we could not as it would effect the childs education!
Isn't your strike action doing the same?! I am in support of you but please don't have double standards. Ooh the irony!
What and get another 1% pay award, and a stay of execution of pension rights. This kind of action gets NOWHERE and of course what about the parents who have lost a days pay or work if they are self-employed having to look after there kids because of this selfish action? If they don't like the jobs or conditions (which are pretty decent compared to most jobs) why don't they go find another job/career?

But that is not easy is it?

Sorry but they need to step out of the protective school regime and out into the real world.
[quote][p][bold]Hunter4[/bold] wrote: I am fully supportive of teachers standing up to this government in repect of pay & conditions and they have been left with no choice but to strike which unfortunately will effect thouands of children throughout the UK. With this in mind I recently asked our school to take our children out of term time for a family wedding next year but we were told we could not as it would effect the childs education! Isn't your strike action doing the same?! I am in support of you but please don't have double standards. Ooh the irony![/p][/quote]What and get another 1% pay award, and a stay of execution of pension rights. This kind of action gets NOWHERE and of course what about the parents who have lost a days pay or work if they are self-employed having to look after there kids because of this selfish action? If they don't like the jobs or conditions (which are pretty decent compared to most jobs) why don't they go find another job/career? But that is not easy is it? Sorry but they need to step out of the protective school regime and out into the real world. ksmain
  • Score: 0

8:49pm Wed 26 Mar 14

ksmain says...

Sparticles wrote:
Don't forget stevie that out of those 65 hours a week that she works, she only gets paid for 32.5 of them. That's 39 weeks unpaid a year. Maybe that puts the 13 week holiday into perspective. Unfortunately most people are unaware of the hours that teachers put in preferring to believe we go home at 3:30 and put our feet up.
Join the club - others of us do extra for no pay as well.A lot of NHS staff work hours extra for free. And she does have a choice where she works - it is a free country.
[quote][p][bold]Sparticles[/bold] wrote: Don't forget stevie that out of those 65 hours a week that she works, she only gets paid for 32.5 of them. That's 39 weeks unpaid a year. Maybe that puts the 13 week holiday into perspective. Unfortunately most people are unaware of the hours that teachers put in preferring to believe we go home at 3:30 and put our feet up.[/p][/quote]Join the club - others of us do extra for no pay as well.A lot of NHS staff work hours extra for free. And she does have a choice where she works - it is a free country. ksmain
  • Score: -2

6:25am Thu 27 Mar 14

Sparticles says...

ksmain wrote:
Sparticles wrote:
Don't forget stevie that out of those 65 hours a week that she works, she only gets paid for 32.5 of them. That's 39 weeks unpaid a year. Maybe that puts the 13 week holiday into perspective. Unfortunately most people are unaware of the hours that teachers put in preferring to believe we go home at 3:30 and put our feet up.
Join the club - others of us do extra for no pay as well.A lot of NHS staff work hours extra for free. And she does have a choice where she works - it is a free country.
Many teachers use that choice, that's why 50% leave in the first five years. That really should set alarm bells ringing and is the reason for the action. I do not know of many jobs where the contract explicitly states that you are expected to work for free. That's slave labour by definition.

Anyone who thinks that it is easy should try one of the teaching taster sessions run by the DfE. Maybe then you can speak from a viewpoint of experience rather than making assumptions.
[quote][p][bold]ksmain[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Sparticles[/bold] wrote: Don't forget stevie that out of those 65 hours a week that she works, she only gets paid for 32.5 of them. That's 39 weeks unpaid a year. Maybe that puts the 13 week holiday into perspective. Unfortunately most people are unaware of the hours that teachers put in preferring to believe we go home at 3:30 and put our feet up.[/p][/quote]Join the club - others of us do extra for no pay as well.A lot of NHS staff work hours extra for free. And she does have a choice where she works - it is a free country.[/p][/quote]Many teachers use that choice, that's why 50% leave in the first five years. That really should set alarm bells ringing and is the reason for the action. I do not know of many jobs where the contract explicitly states that you are expected to work for free. That's slave labour by definition. Anyone who thinks that it is easy should try one of the teaching taster sessions run by the DfE. Maybe then you can speak from a viewpoint of experience rather than making assumptions. Sparticles
  • Score: 2

9:31am Thu 27 Mar 14

IDONTKNOWIFITISTRRUE says...

This happened yesterday so why is it still on the website?
This happened yesterday so why is it still on the website? IDONTKNOWIFITISTRRUE
  • Score: 0

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