Schools close as teachers take strike action

Dorset Echo: MAKING A POINT: Representatives from Dorset, Bournemouth and Poole attend an NUT rally at the Allendale Centre in Wimborne MAKING A POINT: Representatives from Dorset, Bournemouth and Poole attend an NUT rally at the Allendale Centre in Wimborne

DORSET teachers walked out of their classrooms in the latest strike over pay and conditions.

Many parents had to take a day off work to look after children as thousands of students had an extra day at home due to strike action. Nine schools closed in total while a further ten were partially closed.

Members of the National Union of Teachers (NUT) held the one-day strike after they say there had been no significant talks about their concerns with Education Secretary Michael Gove, inset.

Pay, working conditions, pensions, stress levels and the number of young teachers leaving the profession are all concerns union bosses want to discuss with Mr Gove. It is estimated around 7,000 students in the South and West Dorset area were off yesterday as schools across Dorset closed or partially closed.

Many schools closed to younger pupils but remained open to those in Years 11, 12 and 13.

Dorset County Council encouraged as many schools as possible to remain open, but said the final decision on whether to close a school would be down to the headteacher and chairman of governors.

South Dorset primary school teacher Jane Andrews attended a rally of teachers in Wimborne yesterday. She said her message to Mr Gove would be: “We are not teaching, we are assessing.

“I feel we should change our names to assessors. All they are interested in is league tables.

“Teaching now is driven for assessments, not for making children creative, rounded people.”

She added: “I think he should come into a school like ours and he should try teaching for a week and do the marking and assessments and meetings and at the same time do something else we do like reports or levelling of writing. It’s not just teaching. It’s not just a day in school.”

 

TEACHERS in Dorset attended a rally to make their feelings known.
Members of the NUT held the rally in Wimborne yesterday.
Regional executive representative Robin Head said: “I’m very pleased with the turnout. I know the majority of parents are supportive even though some of them have had to make childcare arrangements and we do apologise for that because we don’t want to be doing this.
“We gave Michael Gove several opportunities to talk with us about these issues but he hasn’t done, so there is nothing else we can do except to take this action.
“In general we are finding the public’s reaction very positive so I think our message is getting across.”

 

Comments (4)

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7:13am Thu 27 Mar 14

cj07589 says...

This lot are living in la la land time to wake up and smell the coffee or get back to class and teach. If I was to strike I'd be looking for a new job so it's completely unacceptable to hold our children's education to ransom.
This lot are living in la la land time to wake up and smell the coffee or get back to class and teach. If I was to strike I'd be looking for a new job so it's completely unacceptable to hold our children's education to ransom. cj07589
  • Score: 2

9:30am Thu 27 Mar 14

IDONTKNOWIFITISTRRUE says...

Yesterdays news!
Yesterdays news! IDONTKNOWIFITISTRRUE
  • Score: 1

11:54am Thu 27 Mar 14

broadweybill says...

Anyone who knows a teacher or is a teacher knows how hard they work – 60 hours a week or more, plus time spent in holidays (which they are not paid for). My wife is a primary school teacher and this is exactly her experience. She is even doing assessments and parents evening during her maternity leave, at 8 months + pregnant.

Teachers care a great deal about the education of the children in their care – in many cases (and certainly in my wife’s case) sometimes to the detriment of their own home life and their own health. To demean the fantastic job the majority do by not supporting a strike is not to understand the job they do.

Teachers strike BECAUSE they care about children’s education. The measures brought in by the secretary of state have included unqualified teachers being allowed to teach in school (would you let an unqualified doctor treat your children?), government assets being given away to private companies (ask your local Academy who owns the deeds to the school land/property), and tests for 5 year olds in which they will be told where they rank compared to the rest of the country. This is to say nothing of the trebling of HE tuition fees, the building of free schools in areas with excess school places, the unfair GCSE grades awarded last year, the attacks on teachers pay/pensions (and thus quality of teachers) and his constant attacks on teachers. All of these measures are designed to drive down standards and encourage privatisation – often resulting in state assets given away cheaply or freely to associates of politicians.

Schools are not there as free childcare for people who do not want to take responsibility for their own children. They are there to educate your children, to broaden their minds, their horizons and to discover their talents. To better themselves. Free education is a privilege. When teachers strike, it is not done lightly, and it is because they believe that government policies are damaging to the quality of education. One day’s strike now will help protect education in the future, in the same way that one day’s strike by Firemen will protect lives in future.

I wholeheartedly support all teachers who have taken the brave and difficult decision to strike, because they are standing up for the quality of education that Britain deserves, rather than burying their heads in the sand whilst the government attempts to privatise and destroy another of Britain’s great institutions – an excellent state school system.
Anyone who knows a teacher or is a teacher knows how hard they work – 60 hours a week or more, plus time spent in holidays (which they are not paid for). My wife is a primary school teacher and this is exactly her experience. She is even doing assessments and parents evening during her maternity leave, at 8 months + pregnant. Teachers care a great deal about the education of the children in their care – in many cases (and certainly in my wife’s case) sometimes to the detriment of their own home life and their own health. To demean the fantastic job the majority do by not supporting a strike is not to understand the job they do. Teachers strike BECAUSE they care about children’s education. The measures brought in by the secretary of state have included unqualified teachers being allowed to teach in school (would you let an unqualified doctor treat your children?), government assets being given away to private companies (ask your local Academy who owns the deeds to the school land/property), and tests for 5 year olds in which they will be told where they rank compared to the rest of the country. This is to say nothing of the trebling of HE tuition fees, the building of free schools in areas with excess school places, the unfair GCSE grades awarded last year, the attacks on teachers pay/pensions (and thus quality of teachers) and his constant attacks on teachers. All of these measures are designed to drive down standards and encourage privatisation – often resulting in state assets given away cheaply or freely to associates of politicians. Schools are not there as free childcare for people who do not want to take responsibility for their own children. They are there to educate your children, to broaden their minds, their horizons and to discover their talents. To better themselves. Free education is a privilege. When teachers strike, it is not done lightly, and it is because they believe that government policies are damaging to the quality of education. One day’s strike now will help protect education in the future, in the same way that one day’s strike by Firemen will protect lives in future. I wholeheartedly support all teachers who have taken the brave and difficult decision to strike, because they are standing up for the quality of education that Britain deserves, rather than burying their heads in the sand whilst the government attempts to privatise and destroy another of Britain’s great institutions – an excellent state school system. broadweybill
  • Score: -2

4:19pm Thu 27 Mar 14

cj07589 says...

broadweybill wrote:
Anyone who knows a teacher or is a teacher knows how hard they work – 60 hours a week or more, plus time spent in holidays (which they are not paid for). My wife is a primary school teacher and this is exactly her experience. She is even doing assessments and parents evening during her maternity leave, at 8 months + pregnant.

Teachers care a great deal about the education of the children in their care – in many cases (and certainly in my wife’s case) sometimes to the detriment of their own home life and their own health. To demean the fantastic job the majority do by not supporting a strike is not to understand the job they do.

Teachers strike BECAUSE they care about children’s education. The measures brought in by the secretary of state have included unqualified teachers being allowed to teach in school (would you let an unqualified doctor treat your children?), government assets being given away to private companies (ask your local Academy who owns the deeds to the school land/property), and tests for 5 year olds in which they will be told where they rank compared to the rest of the country. This is to say nothing of the trebling of HE tuition fees, the building of free schools in areas with excess school places, the unfair GCSE grades awarded last year, the attacks on teachers pay/pensions (and thus quality of teachers) and his constant attacks on teachers. All of these measures are designed to drive down standards and encourage privatisation – often resulting in state assets given away cheaply or freely to associates of politicians.

Schools are not there as free childcare for people who do not want to take responsibility for their own children. They are there to educate your children, to broaden their minds, their horizons and to discover their talents. To better themselves. Free education is a privilege. When teachers strike, it is not done lightly, and it is because they believe that government policies are damaging to the quality of education. One day’s strike now will help protect education in the future, in the same way that one day’s strike by Firemen will protect lives in future.

I wholeheartedly support all teachers who have taken the brave and difficult decision to strike, because they are standing up for the quality of education that Britain deserves, rather than burying their heads in the sand whilst the government attempts to privatise and destroy another of Britain’s great institutions – an excellent state school system.
Rubbish, state education is this country has been sliding downhill for some considerable time. You only need to look at the output and digest world education rankings to work that one out. You say teachers work hard to which I completely agree, however they also do get considerable time off which offsets this. I'd love to have a inflation linked pension too however to achieve something comparable in the private sector I need to contribute and make sacrifices to get it. I honest think you're have a laugh expecting the tax payer to fund your cushy retirement whilst the rest of us get less and less for our own pensions. I do think the MPs are greedy rotten toads for taking an 11percent payrise and that unfunded money should have gone toward investing in education or giving teachers a payrise.
[quote][p][bold]broadweybill[/bold] wrote: Anyone who knows a teacher or is a teacher knows how hard they work – 60 hours a week or more, plus time spent in holidays (which they are not paid for). My wife is a primary school teacher and this is exactly her experience. She is even doing assessments and parents evening during her maternity leave, at 8 months + pregnant. Teachers care a great deal about the education of the children in their care – in many cases (and certainly in my wife’s case) sometimes to the detriment of their own home life and their own health. To demean the fantastic job the majority do by not supporting a strike is not to understand the job they do. Teachers strike BECAUSE they care about children’s education. The measures brought in by the secretary of state have included unqualified teachers being allowed to teach in school (would you let an unqualified doctor treat your children?), government assets being given away to private companies (ask your local Academy who owns the deeds to the school land/property), and tests for 5 year olds in which they will be told where they rank compared to the rest of the country. This is to say nothing of the trebling of HE tuition fees, the building of free schools in areas with excess school places, the unfair GCSE grades awarded last year, the attacks on teachers pay/pensions (and thus quality of teachers) and his constant attacks on teachers. All of these measures are designed to drive down standards and encourage privatisation – often resulting in state assets given away cheaply or freely to associates of politicians. Schools are not there as free childcare for people who do not want to take responsibility for their own children. They are there to educate your children, to broaden their minds, their horizons and to discover their talents. To better themselves. Free education is a privilege. When teachers strike, it is not done lightly, and it is because they believe that government policies are damaging to the quality of education. One day’s strike now will help protect education in the future, in the same way that one day’s strike by Firemen will protect lives in future. I wholeheartedly support all teachers who have taken the brave and difficult decision to strike, because they are standing up for the quality of education that Britain deserves, rather than burying their heads in the sand whilst the government attempts to privatise and destroy another of Britain’s great institutions – an excellent state school system.[/p][/quote]Rubbish, state education is this country has been sliding downhill for some considerable time. You only need to look at the output and digest world education rankings to work that one out. You say teachers work hard to which I completely agree, however they also do get considerable time off which offsets this. I'd love to have a inflation linked pension too however to achieve something comparable in the private sector I need to contribute and make sacrifices to get it. I honest think you're have a laugh expecting the tax payer to fund your cushy retirement whilst the rest of us get less and less for our own pensions. I do think the MPs are greedy rotten toads for taking an 11percent payrise and that unfunded money should have gone toward investing in education or giving teachers a payrise. cj07589
  • Score: 1

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