Cows starve to death in field as farmer 'struggles to feed them'

A cow in the field near Toller Porcorum

A cow in the field near Toller Porcorum

First published in News
Last updated
Dorset Echo: Photograph of the Author by , Senior Reporter

DOZENS of cows have been left starving in a West Dorset field, farmers claim.

It is understood that at least four animals from a 90-strong herd have died on land near Toller Porcorum in the last two weeks.

A Dorset County Council spokesman said trading standards were aware of the issue and would continue to monitor the herd.

The owner was ‘genuinely struggling’ to feed the animals, she added.

Farmers, residents and a retired vet are among those who contacted the Echo to speak out about the issue.

One farmer, who did not want to be named, said: “It’s absolutely dire. They were moved to this land just after Christmas and they have just been getting thinner and thinner.”

Grass is scarce on the land where the cows have been left to graze, the farmer added.

“There is supplementary feed but it is being taken by the stronger animals, leaving none for the weaker ones.

“There has been a failure by trading standards because nothing is being done and all the time these animals are suffering and dying.”

A retired vet, who also did not want to be named, said: “It is a really serious issue and the local farmers are quite upset about it because they have to drive past on a daily basis.

“The bodies of several cows have been left in that field for days at a time, just covered in tarpaulin.

“Those animals have been left to suffer because action is not being taken quickly enough.”

A spokesman for Dorset County Council said: “Calls have been received by the trading standards animal health team over last weekend and the previous week about the condition of cows and the discovery of a total of four dead cows at a farm in Toller Pocorum.

“Officers from the animal health team responded immediately and after advice to the owner the dead animals have been removed.

“Officers also called in a Defra vet to check over the whole herd and a management plan for the welfare of the remaining animals, about 90 in total, is in now place.

“The owner appears to have been genuinely struggling to deal with feeding the animals after moving them from another farm.

“No formal action is expected to come from this incident unless the situation worsens.”

Ivan Hancock, trading standards service manager for Dorset County Council said: “We very much value reports and complaints from members of the public about the welfare of any livestock.

“We will be monitoring the safety and wellbeing of the remaining herd in this particular instance and are confident that the reasons behind the deaths of the four cows were not borne out of intentional neglect or cruelty.”

If any members of the public suspect welfare issues with farm animals, they are encouraged to call the trading standards animal health telephone number on 01305 224475.

Comments (25)

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7:30am Sat 5 Apr 14

bandit1 says...

No formal action is expected to come from this incident , WHY if that had been a horse or dog the owners would be in court if they cant look after them they shouldn't be in the farming business
No formal action is expected to come from this incident , WHY if that had been a horse or dog the owners would be in court if they cant look after them they shouldn't be in the farming business bandit1
  • Score: 46

7:36am Sat 5 Apr 14

cosmick says...

Something not quite right here, the animals are suffering 4 dead the authoritys doing what?
Why not send a reporter there get the facts and report them ,after all that is what the public would like to see the ECHO do . FACTS, REPORT, ACTION, RESULTS. (will need to leave the office)
Something not quite right here, the animals are suffering 4 dead the authoritys doing what? Why not send a reporter there get the facts and report them ,after all that is what the public would like to see the ECHO do . FACTS, REPORT, ACTION, RESULTS. (will need to leave the office) cosmick
  • Score: 32

11:11am Sat 5 Apr 14

7drawers says...

bandit1 wrote:
No formal action is expected to come from this incident , WHY if that had been a horse or dog the owners would be in court if they cant look after them they shouldn't be in the farming business
Farming is a struggle always has and will be...... Help is needed here not blame and certainly not from those with no experiance
[quote][p][bold]bandit1[/bold] wrote: No formal action is expected to come from this incident , WHY if that had been a horse or dog the owners would be in court if they cant look after them they shouldn't be in the farming business[/p][/quote]Farming is a struggle always has and will be...... Help is needed here not blame and certainly not from those with no experiance 7drawers
  • Score: -22

1:04pm Sat 5 Apr 14

JamesYoung says...

7drawers wrote:
bandit1 wrote: No formal action is expected to come from this incident , WHY if that had been a horse or dog the owners would be in court if they cant look after them they shouldn't be in the farming business
Farming is a struggle always has and will be...... Help is needed here not blame and certainly not from those with no experiance
An unhelpful comment, really. I have a problem with the myth that only farmers can be trusted to look after the countryside. Farmers run farms for profit and the clear evidence that they are therefore not good stewards of the land can be found in the fact that modern crop management requires chemicals by the tonne, few of which are good for the land or for us and certainly not for marine life. In this case, the cattle are starving because they are not being fed. If the farmer cannot feed the cattle then he should give them away to someone who can. They surely cannot have any value in their emaciated state. I'm sure the individual concerned has genuine problems, but the time when this was considered a reasonable excuse for a pet owner is many years in the past.
[quote][p][bold]7drawers[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bandit1[/bold] wrote: No formal action is expected to come from this incident , WHY if that had been a horse or dog the owners would be in court if they cant look after them they shouldn't be in the farming business[/p][/quote]Farming is a struggle always has and will be...... Help is needed here not blame and certainly not from those with no experiance[/p][/quote]An unhelpful comment, really. I have a problem with the myth that only farmers can be trusted to look after the countryside. Farmers run farms for profit and the clear evidence that they are therefore not good stewards of the land can be found in the fact that modern crop management requires chemicals by the tonne, few of which are good for the land or for us and certainly not for marine life. In this case, the cattle are starving because they are not being fed. If the farmer cannot feed the cattle then he should give them away to someone who can. They surely cannot have any value in their emaciated state. I'm sure the individual concerned has genuine problems, but the time when this was considered a reasonable excuse for a pet owner is many years in the past. JamesYoung
  • Score: 19

1:45pm Sat 5 Apr 14

sjc100 says...

farmers will run there farms for profit as they are in a business to make money any good business will need to make profit to suceed and re invest..
you can not generalise and say they do not look after the countryside alot of farmers set aside some of the land each year to grow crops to attract wildlife.
a certain amount of chemicals are needed to help the crops grow and get the full potentioal out of them, these day the chemicals and fertilizers used alot weaker than they were years ago.
i agree that this is a case of neglect, for what ever reason but help is needed for the sake of the animals, criticising is not going to help the animals., as an animal lover and i personally help feed up to 200 head of cattle each mornig, i do know what it is like to look after them
farmers will run there farms for profit as they are in a business to make money any good business will need to make profit to suceed and re invest.. you can not generalise and say they do not look after the countryside alot of farmers set aside some of the land each year to grow crops to attract wildlife. a certain amount of chemicals are needed to help the crops grow and get the full potentioal out of them, these day the chemicals and fertilizers used alot weaker than they were years ago. i agree that this is a case of neglect, for what ever reason but help is needed for the sake of the animals, criticising is not going to help the animals., as an animal lover and i personally help feed up to 200 head of cattle each mornig, i do know what it is like to look after them sjc100
  • Score: 9

2:43pm Sat 5 Apr 14

bailey 12 says...

It is a disgrace . Claves being left up there with dead mums , can not believe nothing is being done. It's not fair on people who have to drive by on a daily basis with the smell. The dead cow on the page 2 will have been there a week Monday on the 7th. How do animals stand a change in this world if people will not doing anything? Humans can be so cruel , when the local trading standards could of done something and didn't which is just causing more to die.
It is a disgrace . Claves being left up there with dead mums , can not believe nothing is being done. It's not fair on people who have to drive by on a daily basis with the smell. The dead cow on the page 2 will have been there a week Monday on the 7th. How do animals stand a change in this world if people will not doing anything? Humans can be so cruel , when the local trading standards could of done something and didn't which is just causing more to die. bailey 12
  • Score: 21

2:49pm Sat 5 Apr 14

gilly848 says...

Where is the Royal Society for the Protection and Cruelty to Animals in all this?
They are one of the richest charities in the UK.
Strange how they wash their hands of farm animals!
Where is the Royal Society for the Protection and Cruelty to Animals in all this? They are one of the richest charities in the UK. Strange how they wash their hands of farm animals! gilly848
  • Score: 10

3:25pm Sat 5 Apr 14

radiator says...

To say that farmers are not good stewards of the land is incorrect how are they to put nutrients back into the soil?.A lot of farmers use natural animal slurry as a fertilizer and only use artificial as a supplement as the cost is quite high.
Of course they are in it to make a profit they dont do the job as a hobby, I dont think you will see many rich farmers after the winter we have just had either in fact there is a couple I know who have lost a lot of their winter crops. Its a sad case about these cows and obviously the owner is in urgent need of help,we dont know the facts here perhaps the poor man is to proud to ask for help or has some other issues, either way surely one of the neighboring farmers could have helped with some feed until things are sorted.
To say that farmers are not good stewards of the land is incorrect how are they to put nutrients back into the soil?.A lot of farmers use natural animal slurry as a fertilizer and only use artificial as a supplement as the cost is quite high. Of course they are in it to make a profit they dont do the job as a hobby, I dont think you will see many rich farmers after the winter we have just had either in fact there is a couple I know who have lost a lot of their winter crops. Its a sad case about these cows and obviously the owner is in urgent need of help,we dont know the facts here perhaps the poor man is to proud to ask for help or has some other issues, either way surely one of the neighboring farmers could have helped with some feed until things are sorted. radiator
  • Score: 4

3:32pm Sat 5 Apr 14

bailey 12 says...

radiator wrote:
To say that farmers are not good stewards of the land is incorrect how are they to put nutrients back into the soil?.A lot of farmers use natural animal slurry as a fertilizer and only use artificial as a supplement as the cost is quite high. Of course they are in it to make a profit they dont do the job as a hobby, I dont think you will see many rich farmers after the winter we have just had either in fact there is a couple I know who have lost a lot of their winter crops. Its a sad case about these cows and obviously the owner is in urgent need of help,we dont know the facts here perhaps the poor man is to proud to ask for help or has some other issues, either way surely one of the neighboring farmers could have helped with some feed until things are sorted.
Why should neighboring farmers be out of pocket ? Surly if you can't afford to feed them then you should either down size the heard or sell them .
[quote][p][bold]radiator[/bold] wrote: To say that farmers are not good stewards of the land is incorrect how are they to put nutrients back into the soil?.A lot of farmers use natural animal slurry as a fertilizer and only use artificial as a supplement as the cost is quite high. Of course they are in it to make a profit they dont do the job as a hobby, I dont think you will see many rich farmers after the winter we have just had either in fact there is a couple I know who have lost a lot of their winter crops. Its a sad case about these cows and obviously the owner is in urgent need of help,we dont know the facts here perhaps the poor man is to proud to ask for help or has some other issues, either way surely one of the neighboring farmers could have helped with some feed until things are sorted.[/p][/quote]Why should neighboring farmers be out of pocket ? Surly if you can't afford to feed them then you should either down size the heard or sell them . bailey 12
  • Score: 5

3:48pm Sat 5 Apr 14

toyota777 says...

Drive past every day then why not toss in a bale of hay occasionally if you feel that bad about it. Fellow farmers.
Drive past every day then why not toss in a bale of hay occasionally if you feel that bad about it. Fellow farmers. toyota777
  • Score: 15

4:04pm Sat 5 Apr 14

bandit1 says...

JamesYoung wrote:
7drawers wrote:
bandit1 wrote: No formal action is expected to come from this incident , WHY if that had been a horse or dog the owners would be in court if they cant look after them they shouldn't be in the farming business
Farming is a struggle always has and will be...... Help is needed here not blame and certainly not from those with no experiance
An unhelpful comment, really. I have a problem with the myth that only farmers can be trusted to look after the countryside. Farmers run farms for profit and the clear evidence that they are therefore not good stewards of the land can be found in the fact that modern crop management requires chemicals by the tonne, few of which are good for the land or for us and certainly not for marine life. In this case, the cattle are starving because they are not being fed. If the farmer cannot feed the cattle then he should give them away to someone who can. They surely cannot have any value in their emaciated state. I'm sure the individual concerned has genuine problems, but the time when this was considered a reasonable excuse for a pet owner is many years in the past.
Who said i had no experience do you know that? no you dont, a friend of mine had a large dairy farm where I spent a lot of time on when I was younger I didnt see starving animals there ,there is no excuse for neglect.
[quote][p][bold]JamesYoung[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]7drawers[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bandit1[/bold] wrote: No formal action is expected to come from this incident , WHY if that had been a horse or dog the owners would be in court if they cant look after them they shouldn't be in the farming business[/p][/quote]Farming is a struggle always has and will be...... Help is needed here not blame and certainly not from those with no experiance[/p][/quote]An unhelpful comment, really. I have a problem with the myth that only farmers can be trusted to look after the countryside. Farmers run farms for profit and the clear evidence that they are therefore not good stewards of the land can be found in the fact that modern crop management requires chemicals by the tonne, few of which are good for the land or for us and certainly not for marine life. In this case, the cattle are starving because they are not being fed. If the farmer cannot feed the cattle then he should give them away to someone who can. They surely cannot have any value in their emaciated state. I'm sure the individual concerned has genuine problems, but the time when this was considered a reasonable excuse for a pet owner is many years in the past.[/p][/quote]Who said i had no experience do you know that? no you dont, a friend of mine had a large dairy farm where I spent a lot of time on when I was younger I didnt see starving animals there ,there is no excuse for neglect. bandit1
  • Score: 7

5:26pm Sat 5 Apr 14

wurzelbasher says...

If they can't be fed then they should be sold; plain and simple!
If they can't be fed then they should be sold; plain and simple! wurzelbasher
  • Score: 11

5:36pm Sat 5 Apr 14

bailey 12 says...

toyota777 wrote:
Drive past every day then why not toss in a bale of hay occasionally if you feel that bad about it. Fellow farmers.
Your talk about £16 a bale of hay, 90 cattle would need around 2 bales a day if not more mmmmmmm. ..... work that out your self all the other farmers would be out of profit let alone not having the food to feed there cattle. Why should they have to do this if the person in question can not afford to do it them selves ????
[quote][p][bold]toyota777[/bold] wrote: Drive past every day then why not toss in a bale of hay occasionally if you feel that bad about it. Fellow farmers.[/p][/quote]Your talk about £16 a bale of hay, 90 cattle would need around 2 bales a day if not more mmmmmmm. ..... work that out your self all the other farmers would be out of profit let alone not having the food to feed there cattle. Why should they have to do this if the person in question can not afford to do it them selves ???? bailey 12
  • Score: 2

6:55pm Sat 5 Apr 14

radiator says...

bailey 12 wrote:
toyota777 wrote:
Drive past every day then why not toss in a bale of hay occasionally if you feel that bad about it. Fellow farmers.
Your talk about £16 a bale of hay, 90 cattle would need around 2 bales a day if not more mmmmmmm. ..... work that out your self all the other farmers would be out of profit let alone not having the food to feed there cattle. Why should they have to do this if the person in question can not afford to do it them selves ????
I guess you havnt got much compassion running through your veins have you?I think it was suggested that food may have been provided until such times an investigation could have been carried out.How do we know that this farmer hasnt got health issues for instance,you obviously dont know about farming as it would need a bit more than two bales to feed 90 cattle.
[quote][p][bold]bailey 12[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]toyota777[/bold] wrote: Drive past every day then why not toss in a bale of hay occasionally if you feel that bad about it. Fellow farmers.[/p][/quote]Your talk about £16 a bale of hay, 90 cattle would need around 2 bales a day if not more mmmmmmm. ..... work that out your self all the other farmers would be out of profit let alone not having the food to feed there cattle. Why should they have to do this if the person in question can not afford to do it them selves ????[/p][/quote]I guess you havnt got much compassion running through your veins have you?I think it was suggested that food may have been provided until such times an investigation could have been carried out.How do we know that this farmer hasnt got health issues for instance,you obviously dont know about farming as it would need a bit more than two bales to feed 90 cattle. radiator
  • Score: -2

7:03pm Sat 5 Apr 14

Tinker2 says...

90 head of cattle is a heavy stocking rate and any farmer should know their feed requirements and size of field(s) needed. Grass has been growing well in the last month, so clearly the stocking rate is too high. Basic lack of pre-planning and management = cruelty to the animals. Person responsible should be fined and banned from keeping any stock. The existing stock removed.
90 head of cattle is a heavy stocking rate and any farmer should know their feed requirements and size of field(s) needed. Grass has been growing well in the last month, so clearly the stocking rate is too high. Basic lack of pre-planning and management = cruelty to the animals. Person responsible should be fined and banned from keeping any stock. The existing stock removed. Tinker2
  • Score: 15

7:08pm Sat 5 Apr 14

bailey 12 says...

radiator wrote:
bailey 12 wrote:
toyota777 wrote: Drive past every day then why not toss in a bale of hay occasionally if you feel that bad about it. Fellow farmers.
Your talk about £16 a bale of hay, 90 cattle would need around 2 bales a day if not more mmmmmmm. ..... work that out your self all the other farmers would be out of profit let alone not having the food to feed there cattle. Why should they have to do this if the person in question can not afford to do it them selves ????
I guess you havnt got much compassion running through your veins have you?I think it was suggested that food may have been provided until such times an investigation could have been carried out.How do we know that this farmer hasnt got health issues for instance,you obviously dont know about farming as it would need a bit more than two bales to feed 90 cattle.
Thank you I do know about farming as I am a farmer and I said at least two bales a day just to keep them alive. I do know the farmer in question , this has been going on since January ! They can't even be bother to give them water. Even if they had health issues you need to find someone else to look after them. I might have some compassion if I had not been going on for so long. It's plain and simple they need to be in court as if it was a human/ dog/ horse they would of been in court by now.
[quote][p][bold]radiator[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bailey 12[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]toyota777[/bold] wrote: Drive past every day then why not toss in a bale of hay occasionally if you feel that bad about it. Fellow farmers.[/p][/quote]Your talk about £16 a bale of hay, 90 cattle would need around 2 bales a day if not more mmmmmmm. ..... work that out your self all the other farmers would be out of profit let alone not having the food to feed there cattle. Why should they have to do this if the person in question can not afford to do it them selves ????[/p][/quote]I guess you havnt got much compassion running through your veins have you?I think it was suggested that food may have been provided until such times an investigation could have been carried out.How do we know that this farmer hasnt got health issues for instance,you obviously dont know about farming as it would need a bit more than two bales to feed 90 cattle.[/p][/quote]Thank you I do know about farming as I am a farmer and I said at least two bales a day just to keep them alive. I do know the farmer in question , this has been going on since January ! They can't even be bother to give them water. Even if they had health issues you need to find someone else to look after them. I might have some compassion if I had not been going on for so long. It's plain and simple they need to be in court as if it was a human/ dog/ horse they would of been in court by now. bailey 12
  • Score: 17

7:10pm Sat 5 Apr 14

bailey 12 says...

This gives us farmer a bad name
This gives us farmer a bad name bailey 12
  • Score: 4

7:11pm Sat 5 Apr 14

bailey 12 says...

Tinker2 wrote:
90 head of cattle is a heavy stocking rate and any farmer should know their feed requirements and size of field(s) needed. Grass has been growing well in the last month, so clearly the stocking rate is too high. Basic lack of pre-planning and management = cruelty to the animals. Person responsible should be fined and banned from keeping any stock. The existing stock removed.
Yeah being removed as they die! Trading stands should have already done something by now
[quote][p][bold]Tinker2[/bold] wrote: 90 head of cattle is a heavy stocking rate and any farmer should know their feed requirements and size of field(s) needed. Grass has been growing well in the last month, so clearly the stocking rate is too high. Basic lack of pre-planning and management = cruelty to the animals. Person responsible should be fined and banned from keeping any stock. The existing stock removed.[/p][/quote]Yeah being removed as they die! Trading stands should have already done something by now bailey 12
  • Score: 9

7:31pm Sat 5 Apr 14

JamesYoung says...

sjc100 wrote:
farmers will run there farms for profit as they are in a business to make money any good business will need to make profit to suceed and re invest..
you can not generalise and say they do not look after the countryside alot of farmers set aside some of the land each year to grow crops to attract wildlife.
a certain amount of chemicals are needed to help the crops grow and get the full potentioal out of them, these day the chemicals and fertilizers used alot weaker than they were years ago.
i agree that this is a case of neglect, for what ever reason but help is needed for the sake of the animals, criticising is not going to help the animals., as an animal lover and i personally help feed up to 200 head of cattle each mornig, i do know what it is like to look after them
But this is precisely my point. I'm not suggesting that farmers are bad people. What i am saying is i have a problem with the arrogant view provided by the previous poster (who from his later comments has no more idea than i do) that they weren't entitled to an opinion because they don't "have experience" (another farmer has since joined the discussion and made quite plain that even to someone with experience, this is unacceptable). The simple fact is that any organisation that is trying to make a profit from a competitive market will always seek to cut corners. There are plenty of ways of getting nutrients back into the soil without using fertilisers (red clover for one), but most farmers can't afford to do it. Ditto the use of pesticides. Our land is being entrusted to people who need to make a profit from it. Nobody would go to Virginia, where they are literally tearing the tops from mountains to strip mine coal and claim that the coal miners are the best stewards of the land.
I accept the practicalities of it and to be quite frank this is a situation that we are all responsible for because we expect to buy a pint of milk for less than it costs the farmer to produce. I am simply saying that to dismiss someone's views because they are a townie is wrong. The townie, because he doesn't have a vested interest, is better equipped to spot practices that are harmful to the environment than is the farmer. In this case, whatever the cause, starving animals to death is completely unacceptable.
[quote][p][bold]sjc100[/bold] wrote: farmers will run there farms for profit as they are in a business to make money any good business will need to make profit to suceed and re invest.. you can not generalise and say they do not look after the countryside alot of farmers set aside some of the land each year to grow crops to attract wildlife. a certain amount of chemicals are needed to help the crops grow and get the full potentioal out of them, these day the chemicals and fertilizers used alot weaker than they were years ago. i agree that this is a case of neglect, for what ever reason but help is needed for the sake of the animals, criticising is not going to help the animals., as an animal lover and i personally help feed up to 200 head of cattle each mornig, i do know what it is like to look after them[/p][/quote]But this is precisely my point. I'm not suggesting that farmers are bad people. What i am saying is i have a problem with the arrogant view provided by the previous poster (who from his later comments has no more idea than i do) that they weren't entitled to an opinion because they don't "have experience" (another farmer has since joined the discussion and made quite plain that even to someone with experience, this is unacceptable). The simple fact is that any organisation that is trying to make a profit from a competitive market will always seek to cut corners. There are plenty of ways of getting nutrients back into the soil without using fertilisers (red clover for one), but most farmers can't afford to do it. Ditto the use of pesticides. Our land is being entrusted to people who need to make a profit from it. Nobody would go to Virginia, where they are literally tearing the tops from mountains to strip mine coal and claim that the coal miners are the best stewards of the land. I accept the practicalities of it and to be quite frank this is a situation that we are all responsible for because we expect to buy a pint of milk for less than it costs the farmer to produce. I am simply saying that to dismiss someone's views because they are a townie is wrong. The townie, because he doesn't have a vested interest, is better equipped to spot practices that are harmful to the environment than is the farmer. In this case, whatever the cause, starving animals to death is completely unacceptable. JamesYoung
  • Score: 7

7:32pm Sat 5 Apr 14

JamesYoung says...

bandit1 wrote:
JamesYoung wrote:
7drawers wrote:
bandit1 wrote: No formal action is expected to come from this incident , WHY if that had been a horse or dog the owners would be in court if they cant look after them they shouldn't be in the farming business
Farming is a struggle always has and will be...... Help is needed here not blame and certainly not from those with no experiance
An unhelpful comment, really. I have a problem with the myth that only farmers can be trusted to look after the countryside. Farmers run farms for profit and the clear evidence that they are therefore not good stewards of the land can be found in the fact that modern crop management requires chemicals by the tonne, few of which are good for the land or for us and certainly not for marine life. In this case, the cattle are starving because they are not being fed. If the farmer cannot feed the cattle then he should give them away to someone who can. They surely cannot have any value in their emaciated state. I'm sure the individual concerned has genuine problems, but the time when this was considered a reasonable excuse for a pet owner is many years in the past.
Who said i had no experience do you know that? no you dont, a friend of mine had a large dairy farm where I spent a lot of time on when I was younger I didnt see starving animals there ,there is no excuse for neglect.
I think you addressed this to the wrong person ;-)
[quote][p][bold]bandit1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]JamesYoung[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]7drawers[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bandit1[/bold] wrote: No formal action is expected to come from this incident , WHY if that had been a horse or dog the owners would be in court if they cant look after them they shouldn't be in the farming business[/p][/quote]Farming is a struggle always has and will be...... Help is needed here not blame and certainly not from those with no experiance[/p][/quote]An unhelpful comment, really. I have a problem with the myth that only farmers can be trusted to look after the countryside. Farmers run farms for profit and the clear evidence that they are therefore not good stewards of the land can be found in the fact that modern crop management requires chemicals by the tonne, few of which are good for the land or for us and certainly not for marine life. In this case, the cattle are starving because they are not being fed. If the farmer cannot feed the cattle then he should give them away to someone who can. They surely cannot have any value in their emaciated state. I'm sure the individual concerned has genuine problems, but the time when this was considered a reasonable excuse for a pet owner is many years in the past.[/p][/quote]Who said i had no experience do you know that? no you dont, a friend of mine had a large dairy farm where I spent a lot of time on when I was younger I didnt see starving animals there ,there is no excuse for neglect.[/p][/quote]I think you addressed this to the wrong person ;-) JamesYoung
  • Score: 0

7:34pm Sat 5 Apr 14

JamesYoung says...

radiator wrote:
To say that farmers are not good stewards of the land is incorrect how are they to put nutrients back into the soil?.A lot of farmers use natural animal slurry as a fertilizer and only use artificial as a supplement as the cost is quite high.
Of course they are in it to make a profit they dont do the job as a hobby, I dont think you will see many rich farmers after the winter we have just had either in fact there is a couple I know who have lost a lot of their winter crops. Its a sad case about these cows and obviously the owner is in urgent need of help,we dont know the facts here perhaps the poor man is to proud to ask for help or has some other issues, either way surely one of the neighboring farmers could have helped with some feed until things are sorted.
See my previous comment. It was not a criticism of farmers, it was simply attacking the myth that only farmers can know what is good for animals/crops/the land. I know what a farmer earns, and i know where their rightful wages end up (in the hands of supermarkets). But this is even more reason to recognise that with low margins, sound environmental practices are even less likely to be followed. Again, not a criticism of farmers; just a criticism of the earlier poster.
[quote][p][bold]radiator[/bold] wrote: To say that farmers are not good stewards of the land is incorrect how are they to put nutrients back into the soil?.A lot of farmers use natural animal slurry as a fertilizer and only use artificial as a supplement as the cost is quite high. Of course they are in it to make a profit they dont do the job as a hobby, I dont think you will see many rich farmers after the winter we have just had either in fact there is a couple I know who have lost a lot of their winter crops. Its a sad case about these cows and obviously the owner is in urgent need of help,we dont know the facts here perhaps the poor man is to proud to ask for help or has some other issues, either way surely one of the neighboring farmers could have helped with some feed until things are sorted.[/p][/quote]See my previous comment. It was not a criticism of farmers, it was simply attacking the myth that only farmers can know what is good for animals/crops/the land. I know what a farmer earns, and i know where their rightful wages end up (in the hands of supermarkets). But this is even more reason to recognise that with low margins, sound environmental practices are even less likely to be followed. Again, not a criticism of farmers; just a criticism of the earlier poster. JamesYoung
  • Score: 4

11:38pm Sat 5 Apr 14

oldbrock says...

7drawers wrote:
bandit1 wrote:
No formal action is expected to come from this incident , WHY if that had been a horse or dog the owners would be in court if they cant look after them they shouldn't be in the farming business
Farming is a struggle always has and will be...... Help is needed here not blame and certainly not from those with no experiance
old Norfolk saying "you never see a farmer on a bike" they get cheap labour,, virtually no planning permission needed, EU subsidies etc etc now they want sympathy? This dog, my good sir , was worked in youth by a farming "gentleman" that is all the exper Ence I ever need/ed, I know not about experi Ance, I bow to superior intetlligence, however, there is never any excuse for cruelty, never, ever, any excuse whatsoever
[quote][p][bold]7drawers[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bandit1[/bold] wrote: No formal action is expected to come from this incident , WHY if that had been a horse or dog the owners would be in court if they cant look after them they shouldn't be in the farming business[/p][/quote]Farming is a struggle always has and will be...... Help is needed here not blame and certainly not from those with no experiance[/p][/quote]old Norfolk saying "you never see a farmer on a bike" they get cheap labour,, virtually no planning permission needed, EU subsidies etc etc now they want sympathy? This dog, my good sir , was worked in youth by a farming "gentleman" that is all the exper Ence I ever need/ed, I know not about experi Ance, I bow to superior intetlligence, however, there is never any excuse for cruelty, never, ever, any excuse whatsoever oldbrock
  • Score: 9

3:01pm Sun 6 Apr 14

carlinste says...

No good calling the RSPCA they are useless. I lost confidence in them years ago. Do not give to this charity.
No good calling the RSPCA they are useless. I lost confidence in them years ago. Do not give to this charity. carlinste
  • Score: 6

11:54pm Sun 6 Apr 14

peskykat says...

carlinste wrote:
No good calling the RSPCA they are useless. I lost confidence in them years ago. Do not give to this charity.
Well said - i also don't support RSPCA , despite being an animal lover i feel
they fail far too often !! This farmer should be banned from keeping animals, i get tired of farmers making excuses - if you can't afford to keep alot of cattle , etc then see if another farmer can take them on ,
[quote][p][bold]carlinste[/bold] wrote: No good calling the RSPCA they are useless. I lost confidence in them years ago. Do not give to this charity.[/p][/quote]Well said - i also don't support RSPCA , despite being an animal lover i feel they fail far too often !! This farmer should be banned from keeping animals, i get tired of farmers making excuses - if you can't afford to keep alot of cattle , etc then see if another farmer can take them on , peskykat
  • Score: 1

6:00pm Thu 10 Apr 14

JackJohnson says...

If he can't afford to keep his herd healthy, he has to reduce the size of it. If the unhealthy ones are lucky he'll find farmers who'll take someor all of them on.. If not, they're off down the knackers yard. How much work, and how much it will cost to get them back to health, and profit, will determine if any farmer can take any of them on. I doubt there's much room for sentimentality, but you never know.

There really is no difference between farm animals and domestic pets. If you can't find a way to feed your cat or dog it has to go. The only difference is a young cat or dog has a better chance of being rehomed.

It's a great shame, as they're often family businesses that have lasted generations, but some farms fail. Possibly this one is just no longer sustainable. It might do better with different livestock, as an arable farm, or maybe needs to be absorbed into a bigger one where the bad grassland will have less impact or can be given over to wildlife (for subsidies?). Perhaps it needs another income stream (B&B, some craft or specialist workshops) to help supplement the income from the farm in tough times. Perhaps it really is no longer recoverable. It's never pleasant to hear of a business that's failing - but when livestock is suffering because of it, it's probably best that tough decisions are made quickly.
If he can't afford to keep his herd healthy, he has to reduce the size of it. If the unhealthy ones are lucky he'll find farmers who'll take someor all of them on.. If not, they're off down the knackers yard. How much work, and how much it will cost to get them back to health, and profit, will determine if any farmer can take any of them on. I doubt there's much room for sentimentality, but you never know. There really is no difference between farm animals and domestic pets. If you can't find a way to feed your cat or dog it has to go. The only difference is a young cat or dog has a better chance of being rehomed. It's a great shame, as they're often family businesses that have lasted generations, but some farms fail. Possibly this one is just no longer sustainable. It might do better with different livestock, as an arable farm, or maybe needs to be absorbed into a bigger one where the bad grassland will have less impact or can be given over to wildlife (for subsidies?). Perhaps it needs another income stream (B&B, some craft or specialist workshops) to help supplement the income from the farm in tough times. Perhaps it really is no longer recoverable. It's never pleasant to hear of a business that's failing - but when livestock is suffering because of it, it's probably best that tough decisions are made quickly. JackJohnson
  • Score: 0

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