Mobility scooter stolen and torched by vandals

SHOCK: Susan Read, right, with her family

SHOCK: Susan Read, right, with her family

First published in News Dorset Echo: Photograph of the Author by , Chief Reporter

A DISABLED grandmother has hit out at ‘lowest of the low’ thieves who torched her lifeline mobility scooter.

Susan Read, from Weymouth, says she has lost her independence and is in searing pain trying to walk everywhere.

The 57-year-old suffers back problems and had saved up to buy the Rascals mobility scooter because walking aggravates her pain.

‘Cruel’ thieves stole the scooter from her front garden in Brisbane Road, Littlemoor, and it was found torched in a field near Beverley Road two days later.

Police are appealing for witnesses in a bid to trace the culprits.

Mrs Read, who is looking for work, says she fears the vandals have scuppered her plans.

Mrs Read said: “It’s the lowest of the low.

“They’ve taken away my independence; I’m stranded.

“I’m attending Diverse Abilities Plus because I’m training for office work but getting to appointments leaves me in agony.

“I have another one next week and I don’t know what I’m going to do.”

She added: “The other day I walked from my house to the Co-op, which is a five minute walk.

“It took me nearly an hour and 15 minutes to get there and back. I was in agony.”

Mrs Read says she has had to switch to stronger pain killers since the theft of the scooter.

She was left with back damage after a work accident 10 years ago.

She added: “When you’re in so much pain you just don’t know what to do with yourself.

“Usually when I have the scooter to get around, it’s a low level of pain. But it’s still pain.

“But trying to walk everywhere has made it horrendous.

“Years ago people had respect, you wouldn’t do this to someone.

“I am going to be in agony until I can save up to get another scooter.”

Mrs Read says she wants to warn other disabled or elderly residents on the estate to be vigilant.

She added: “To take it for a joy ride is one thing. It could always be rewired.

“But because it’s been torched there’s nothing that can be done.”

Her daughter Lola Foot said: “Mum’s got lots of appointments for her back that she needs to get to.

“I don’t know what she’s going to do.

“This has really made her worse. She’s in so much more pain and is feeling depressed.

“It’s so sad because disabled people depend on things like their scooters and some mindless person has taken her independence away.”

The scooter was stolen sometime between 4pm on April 19 and 6pm on April 20.

n Witnesses and anyone with information should call Dorset Police on 101.

Comments (28)

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9:05am Mon 28 Apr 14

Parkstreetshufle says...

I'd suggest that the fat bloke smoking a cigarette I saw driving one on Saturday on the promenade at speed might like to donate his. If not then one of the other cases of people that clearly need exercise rather than a means to do even less. The criteria for getting one seems to be simply asking looking at some mobility scooter users. That's not a reflection on this case, which seems genuine I might add.
I'd suggest that the fat bloke smoking a cigarette I saw driving one on Saturday on the promenade at speed might like to donate his. If not then one of the other cases of people that clearly need exercise rather than a means to do even less. The criteria for getting one seems to be simply asking looking at some mobility scooter users. That's not a reflection on this case, which seems genuine I might add. Parkstreetshufle
  • Score: 28

9:25am Mon 28 Apr 14

JamesYoung says...

Littlemoor. Again.
Littlemoor. Again. JamesYoung
  • Score: 38

11:13am Mon 28 Apr 14

JackJohnson says...

And this week's lesson is: Why it's always a good idea to insure things you leave vulnerable to theft or vandalism that you can't afford to lose.

I certainly hope they find the scum that did this. They should take him to the middle of nowhere, then break his legs and make him walk to hospital.
And this week's lesson is: Why it's always a good idea to insure things you leave vulnerable to theft or vandalism that you can't afford to lose. I certainly hope they find the scum that did this. They should take him to the middle of nowhere, then break his legs and make him walk to hospital. JackJohnson
  • Score: 23

12:25pm Mon 28 Apr 14

Top Gear says...

Joy riding on a mobility scooter. Haven't the Littlemoor scum got any ambition. I remember when it used to be Impreza's, BMW's, Merc's etc.
I suppose a mobility scooter on the moor is classed as a top of the range car.
Joy riding on a mobility scooter. Haven't the Littlemoor scum got any ambition. I remember when it used to be Impreza's, BMW's, Merc's etc. I suppose a mobility scooter on the moor is classed as a top of the range car. Top Gear
  • Score: 27

12:42pm Mon 28 Apr 14

Get a grip says...

Why are there so many of this type of scooter in Weymouth?

You do not see as many in other towns of the same size.
Why are there so many of this type of scooter in Weymouth? You do not see as many in other towns of the same size. Get a grip
  • Score: 12

2:04pm Mon 28 Apr 14

dorset says...

for the ones who are not disabled... anyone can get a mobility scooter. most get them so they can try and get some sort of life back. the max speed is 4mp on the footpath and 8mph on the road. new eu laws mean they can now go up to 15mph on the road. when you are limited to be only able to walk a short distance, then scooters are great to get you from A to B, so you can walk around B. if the mobility scooter hit you then yes you can complain. as a owner of a mobility scooter and powered wheelchair you find some abled bodied people don't move out of the way of powered chairs and scooters. this is so rude imho. we should be treated like a bike. if you see it coming and your in the way, just please take one step to the side. this shouldn't be to much to ask for. its sickening that this was stolen. insurance cost a lot of money, some people cannot afford insurance, these scooters should not be stolen in the first place. independence is a big word to the disabled. I hope some who have commented end up needing a mobility scooter one day, so they can eat their own words! I feel for this poor woman.
for the ones who are not disabled... anyone can get a mobility scooter. most get them so they can try and get some sort of life back. the max speed is 4mp on the footpath and 8mph on the road. new eu laws mean they can now go up to 15mph on the road. when you are limited to be only able to walk a short distance, then scooters are great to get you from A to B, so you can walk around B. if the mobility scooter hit you then yes you can complain. as a owner of a mobility scooter and powered wheelchair you find some abled bodied people don't move out of the way of powered chairs and scooters. this is so rude imho. we should be treated like a bike. if you see it coming and your in the way, just please take one step to the side. this shouldn't be to much to ask for. its sickening that this was stolen. insurance cost a lot of money, some people cannot afford insurance, these scooters should not be stolen in the first place. independence is a big word to the disabled. I hope some who have commented end up needing a mobility scooter one day, so they can eat their own words! I feel for this poor woman. dorset
  • Score: -16

2:05pm Mon 28 Apr 14

jmc1 says...

More disabled people,maybe
More disabled people,maybe jmc1
  • Score: -3

2:18pm Mon 28 Apr 14

Get a grip says...

dorset wrote:
for the ones who are not disabled... anyone can get a mobility scooter. most get them so they can try and get some sort of life back. the max speed is 4mp on the footpath and 8mph on the road. new eu laws mean they can now go up to 15mph on the road. when you are limited to be only able to walk a short distance, then scooters are great to get you from A to B, so you can walk around B. if the mobility scooter hit you then yes you can complain. as a owner of a mobility scooter and powered wheelchair you find some abled bodied people don't move out of the way of powered chairs and scooters. this is so rude imho. we should be treated like a bike. if you see it coming and your in the way, just please take one step to the side. this shouldn't be to much to ask for. its sickening that this was stolen. insurance cost a lot of money, some people cannot afford insurance, these scooters should not be stolen in the first place. independence is a big word to the disabled. I hope some who have commented end up needing a mobility scooter one day, so they can eat their own words! I feel for this poor woman.
I have sean scooters on the wrong side of the road,in one example down the midlle of the road, going too fast on the pavement and in a convoy of three or four.
[quote][p][bold]dorset[/bold] wrote: for the ones who are not disabled... anyone can get a mobility scooter. most get them so they can try and get some sort of life back. the max speed is 4mp on the footpath and 8mph on the road. new eu laws mean they can now go up to 15mph on the road. when you are limited to be only able to walk a short distance, then scooters are great to get you from A to B, so you can walk around B. if the mobility scooter hit you then yes you can complain. as a owner of a mobility scooter and powered wheelchair you find some abled bodied people don't move out of the way of powered chairs and scooters. this is so rude imho. we should be treated like a bike. if you see it coming and your in the way, just please take one step to the side. this shouldn't be to much to ask for. its sickening that this was stolen. insurance cost a lot of money, some people cannot afford insurance, these scooters should not be stolen in the first place. independence is a big word to the disabled. I hope some who have commented end up needing a mobility scooter one day, so they can eat their own words! I feel for this poor woman.[/p][/quote]I have sean scooters on the wrong side of the road,in one example down the midlle of the road, going too fast on the pavement and in a convoy of three or four. Get a grip
  • Score: 12

2:44pm Mon 28 Apr 14

blobby96 says...

Get a grip wrote:
Why are there so many of this type of scooter in Weymouth?

You do not see as many in other towns of the same size.
because we have so many lazy fat bxxxxxxx in weymouth
[quote][p][bold]Get a grip[/bold] wrote: Why are there so many of this type of scooter in Weymouth? You do not see as many in other towns of the same size.[/p][/quote]because we have so many lazy fat bxxxxxxx in weymouth blobby96
  • Score: 32

2:59pm Mon 28 Apr 14

Bob Goulding says...

Don't these 'vehicles' have any form of immobiliser or other security device. It seems rather foolish to have left such a valuable mobility aid unattended in the front garden for 26 hours especially in an area that is blighted by this sort of crime.
Don't these 'vehicles' have any form of immobiliser or other security device. It seems rather foolish to have left such a valuable mobility aid unattended in the front garden for 26 hours especially in an area that is blighted by this sort of crime. Bob Goulding
  • Score: 12

3:17pm Mon 28 Apr 14

JackJohnson says...

dorset wrote:
for the ones who are not disabled... anyone can get a mobility scooter. most get them so they can try and get some sort of life back. the max speed is 4mp on the footpath and 8mph on the road. new eu laws mean they can now go up to 15mph on the road. when you are limited to be only able to walk a short distance, then scooters are great to get you from A to B, so you can walk around B. if the mobility scooter hit you then yes you can complain. as a owner of a mobility scooter and powered wheelchair you find some abled bodied people don't move out of the way of powered chairs and scooters. this is so rude imho. we should be treated like a bike. if you see it coming and your in the way, just please take one step to the side. this shouldn't be to much to ask for. its sickening that this was stolen. insurance cost a lot of money, some people cannot afford insurance, these scooters should not be stolen in the first place. independence is a big word to the disabled. I hope some who have commented end up needing a mobility scooter one day, so they can eat their own words! I feel for this poor woman.
Mobility scooter insurance is available for £69p.a. Not expensive at all. If you depend on a scooter for your quality of life, ability to look for (let alone travel to) work you can afford it. Amongst other things it also covers public liabilty and (very important) get-you-home costs in the event of a breakdown. There is, unfortunately, no legal requirement to have insurance, but it would be very easy to break someone's ankle for which you could be held liable. The cost of bumping into an old lady or gent who has thin, easily broken skin due to steroidal medication would be horrendous.

My mum relied on one for years because of her rheumatoid arthritis. It kept her independent.

I agree that people have a tendency to get in your way. IMHO they should be restricted to walking pace on footpaths. Standing in the way of them is just rude and offensive but, like cyclists, users travelling faster than walking pace on a footpath should not expect others to get out of their way. They're being courteous if they do, but you're being rude if you expect them to move out of your way. Obviously, cyclists should be given right of way on marked cycle paths.
[quote][p][bold]dorset[/bold] wrote: for the ones who are not disabled... anyone can get a mobility scooter. most get them so they can try and get some sort of life back. the max speed is 4mp on the footpath and 8mph on the road. new eu laws mean they can now go up to 15mph on the road. when you are limited to be only able to walk a short distance, then scooters are great to get you from A to B, so you can walk around B. if the mobility scooter hit you then yes you can complain. as a owner of a mobility scooter and powered wheelchair you find some abled bodied people don't move out of the way of powered chairs and scooters. this is so rude imho. we should be treated like a bike. if you see it coming and your in the way, just please take one step to the side. this shouldn't be to much to ask for. its sickening that this was stolen. insurance cost a lot of money, some people cannot afford insurance, these scooters should not be stolen in the first place. independence is a big word to the disabled. I hope some who have commented end up needing a mobility scooter one day, so they can eat their own words! I feel for this poor woman.[/p][/quote]Mobility scooter insurance is available for £69p.a. Not expensive at all. If you depend on a scooter for your quality of life, ability to look for (let alone travel to) work you can afford it. Amongst other things it also covers public liabilty and (very important) get-you-home costs in the event of a breakdown. There is, unfortunately, no legal requirement to have insurance, but it would be very easy to break someone's ankle for which you could be held liable. The cost of bumping into an old lady or gent who has thin, easily broken skin due to steroidal medication would be horrendous. My mum relied on one for years because of her rheumatoid arthritis. It kept her independent. I agree that people have a tendency to get in your way. IMHO they should be restricted to walking pace on footpaths. Standing in the way of them is just rude and offensive but, like cyclists, users travelling faster than walking pace on a footpath should not expect others to get out of their way. They're being courteous if they do, but you're being rude if you expect them to move out of your way. Obviously, cyclists should be given right of way on marked cycle paths. JackJohnson
  • Score: 19

3:17pm Mon 28 Apr 14

shy talk says...

I have heard that some able body people use mobility scooters to do their shopping. As this is cheaper then running a car with all they attached costs. However don’t get caught as you can be fined. And the chances of getting caught are probably zero. The only way to stop this would be that all type two scooters must be registered as with type 3. I cannot see the police having a zero tolerance policy trying to catch illegal mobility scooter users.
I have heard that some able body people use mobility scooters to do their shopping. As this is cheaper then running a car with all they attached costs. However don’t get caught as you can be fined. And the chances of getting caught are probably zero. The only way to stop this would be that all type two scooters must be registered as with type 3. I cannot see the police having a zero tolerance policy trying to catch illegal mobility scooter users. shy talk
  • Score: 1

3:26pm Mon 28 Apr 14

JackJohnson says...

Bob Goulding wrote:
Don't these 'vehicles' have any form of immobiliser or other security device. It seems rather foolish to have left such a valuable mobility aid unattended in the front garden for 26 hours especially in an area that is blighted by this sort of crime.
Available as an add-on, and may be fitted standard to some scooters, but probably not effective.

It wouldn't take much for a couple of drunks to pick one up and carry it miles (or just one to disengage the drive mechanism and push it away).

My mum used to leave hers outside shops while she was having a walk round inside. It used to crease me up when we'd come out of the shop to find a queue of toddlers bawling their eyes out because they couldn't find the money slot so they could have a go on the 'ride'.
[quote][p][bold]Bob Goulding[/bold] wrote: Don't these 'vehicles' have any form of immobiliser or other security device. It seems rather foolish to have left such a valuable mobility aid unattended in the front garden for 26 hours especially in an area that is blighted by this sort of crime.[/p][/quote]Available as an add-on, and may be fitted standard to some scooters, but probably not effective. It wouldn't take much for a couple of drunks to pick one up and carry it miles (or just one to disengage the drive mechanism and push it away). My mum used to leave hers outside shops while she was having a walk round inside. It used to crease me up when we'd come out of the shop to find a queue of toddlers bawling their eyes out because they couldn't find the money slot so they could have a go on the 'ride'. JackJohnson
  • Score: 11

3:49pm Mon 28 Apr 14

fastjet says...

Get a grip wrote:
dorset wrote:
for the ones who are not disabled... anyone can get a mobility scooter. most get them so they can try and get some sort of life back. the max speed is 4mp on the footpath and 8mph on the road. new eu laws mean they can now go up to 15mph on the road. when you are limited to be only able to walk a short distance, then scooters are great to get you from A to B, so you can walk around B. if the mobility scooter hit you then yes you can complain. as a owner of a mobility scooter and powered wheelchair you find some abled bodied people don't move out of the way of powered chairs and scooters. this is so rude imho. we should be treated like a bike. if you see it coming and your in the way, just please take one step to the side. this shouldn't be to much to ask for. its sickening that this was stolen. insurance cost a lot of money, some people cannot afford insurance, these scooters should not be stolen in the first place. independence is a big word to the disabled. I hope some who have commented end up needing a mobility scooter one day, so they can eat their own words! I feel for this poor woman.
I have sean scooters on the wrong side of the road,in one example down the midlle of the road, going too fast on the pavement and in a convoy of three or four.
Seen use your spell checker
[quote][p][bold]Get a grip[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]dorset[/bold] wrote: for the ones who are not disabled... anyone can get a mobility scooter. most get them so they can try and get some sort of life back. the max speed is 4mp on the footpath and 8mph on the road. new eu laws mean they can now go up to 15mph on the road. when you are limited to be only able to walk a short distance, then scooters are great to get you from A to B, so you can walk around B. if the mobility scooter hit you then yes you can complain. as a owner of a mobility scooter and powered wheelchair you find some abled bodied people don't move out of the way of powered chairs and scooters. this is so rude imho. we should be treated like a bike. if you see it coming and your in the way, just please take one step to the side. this shouldn't be to much to ask for. its sickening that this was stolen. insurance cost a lot of money, some people cannot afford insurance, these scooters should not be stolen in the first place. independence is a big word to the disabled. I hope some who have commented end up needing a mobility scooter one day, so they can eat their own words! I feel for this poor woman.[/p][/quote]I have sean scooters on the wrong side of the road,in one example down the midlle of the road, going too fast on the pavement and in a convoy of three or four.[/p][/quote]Seen use your spell checker fastjet
  • Score: 4

4:44pm Mon 28 Apr 14

Get a grip says...

Fair point about incorrect spelling.

But I still maintain that many scooter users are inconsiderate at best or rude at worst.
Fair point about incorrect spelling. But I still maintain that many scooter users are inconsiderate at best or rude at worst. Get a grip
  • Score: 13

5:58pm Mon 28 Apr 14

every user name was taken says...

It is not very clear as Mrs Read"s foot is conveniently blocking the view, you may notice in the photo the grass has gone from where the scooter had been sitting a long time, but why has the grass not eroded where the wheels would have passed going on and off the path regularly (tyre tracks).

Seems highly suspicious to me.
It is not very clear as Mrs Read"s foot is conveniently blocking the view, you may notice in the photo the grass has gone from where the scooter had been sitting a long time, but why has the grass not eroded where the wheels would have passed going on and off the path regularly (tyre tracks). Seems highly suspicious to me. every user name was taken
  • Score: 10

7:30pm Mon 28 Apr 14

jmc1 says...

every user name was taken wrote:
It is not very clear as Mrs Read"s foot is conveniently blocking the view, you may notice in the photo the grass has gone from where the scooter had been sitting a long time, but why has the grass not eroded where the wheels would have passed going on and off the path regularly (tyre tracks).

Seems highly suspicious to me.
Colombo,you are not
[quote][p][bold]every user name was taken[/bold] wrote: It is not very clear as Mrs Read"s foot is conveniently blocking the view, you may notice in the photo the grass has gone from where the scooter had been sitting a long time, but why has the grass not eroded where the wheels would have passed going on and off the path regularly (tyre tracks). Seems highly suspicious to me.[/p][/quote]Colombo,you are not jmc1
  • Score: -1

9:36am Tue 29 Apr 14

JackJohnson says...

jmc1 wrote:
every user name was taken wrote:
It is not very clear as Mrs Read"s foot is conveniently blocking the view, you may notice in the photo the grass has gone from where the scooter had been sitting a long time, but why has the grass not eroded where the wheels would have passed going on and off the path regularly (tyre tracks).

Seems highly suspicious to me.
Colombo,you are not
Yoda, you are not. ;-)
[quote][p][bold]jmc1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]every user name was taken[/bold] wrote: It is not very clear as Mrs Read"s foot is conveniently blocking the view, you may notice in the photo the grass has gone from where the scooter had been sitting a long time, but why has the grass not eroded where the wheels would have passed going on and off the path regularly (tyre tracks). Seems highly suspicious to me.[/p][/quote]Colombo,you are not[/p][/quote]Yoda, you are not. ;-) JackJohnson
  • Score: 3

10:03am Tue 29 Apr 14

ziggystardust says...

Get a grip wrote:
Why are there so many of this type of scooter in Weymouth?

You do not see as many in other towns of the same size.
Because it supports their claims of being disabled.... I must be disabled, look I got a scooter to prove it.
[quote][p][bold]Get a grip[/bold] wrote: Why are there so many of this type of scooter in Weymouth? You do not see as many in other towns of the same size.[/p][/quote]Because it supports their claims of being disabled.... I must be disabled, look I got a scooter to prove it. ziggystardust
  • Score: 2

10:54am Tue 29 Apr 14

JackJohnson says...

ziggystardust wrote:
Get a grip wrote:
Why are there so many of this type of scooter in Weymouth?

You do not see as many in other towns of the same size.
Because it supports their claims of being disabled.... I must be disabled, look I got a scooter to prove it.
What do you expect people to do to 'prove' they are disabled? Wear a badge? Why does it matter to you? For whatever reason they have a small electric vehicle. It's most likely a necessity or, for a few (at present), a lifestyle choice.

As fossil fuels become more expensive these very practical little vehicles are likely to become more popular. As rechargeable cell technology improves they'll be able to travel further. You'll be seeing a lot more. As they're VERY low on emissions they'll be zero rated for VED once the Government/DVLA has to start recognizing them as personal transport rather than 'exclusively' for the disabled (and a very small minority of people who use them for convenience).

Better get used to it.
[quote][p][bold]ziggystardust[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Get a grip[/bold] wrote: Why are there so many of this type of scooter in Weymouth? You do not see as many in other towns of the same size.[/p][/quote]Because it supports their claims of being disabled.... I must be disabled, look I got a scooter to prove it.[/p][/quote]What do you expect people to do to 'prove' they are disabled? Wear a badge? Why does it matter to you? For whatever reason they have a small electric vehicle. It's most likely a necessity or, for a few (at present), a lifestyle choice. As fossil fuels become more expensive these very practical little vehicles are likely to become more popular. As rechargeable cell technology improves they'll be able to travel further. You'll be seeing a lot more. As they're VERY low on emissions they'll be zero rated for VED once the Government/DVLA has to start recognizing them as personal transport rather than 'exclusively' for the disabled (and a very small minority of people who use them for convenience). Better get used to it. JackJohnson
  • Score: 1

4:20pm Tue 29 Apr 14

JamesYoung says...

JackJohnson wrote:
ziggystardust wrote:
Get a grip wrote:
Why are there so many of this type of scooter in Weymouth?

You do not see as many in other towns of the same size.
Because it supports their claims of being disabled.... I must be disabled, look I got a scooter to prove it.
What do you expect people to do to 'prove' they are disabled? Wear a badge? Why does it matter to you? For whatever reason they have a small electric vehicle. It's most likely a necessity or, for a few (at present), a lifestyle choice.

As fossil fuels become more expensive these very practical little vehicles are likely to become more popular. As rechargeable cell technology improves they'll be able to travel further. You'll be seeing a lot more. As they're VERY low on emissions they'll be zero rated for VED once the Government/DVLA has to start recognizing them as personal transport rather than 'exclusively' for the disabled (and a very small minority of people who use them for convenience).

Better get used to it.
Yup. I was reading just last week about how global oil production has continued to fall at about 2% per year since 2007...it's just that demand is low because nobody has any money. I think as we claw our way out of this recession we will see oil prices rocketing and more and more electric cars on the road.
[quote][p][bold]JackJohnson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ziggystardust[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Get a grip[/bold] wrote: Why are there so many of this type of scooter in Weymouth? You do not see as many in other towns of the same size.[/p][/quote]Because it supports their claims of being disabled.... I must be disabled, look I got a scooter to prove it.[/p][/quote]What do you expect people to do to 'prove' they are disabled? Wear a badge? Why does it matter to you? For whatever reason they have a small electric vehicle. It's most likely a necessity or, for a few (at present), a lifestyle choice. As fossil fuels become more expensive these very practical little vehicles are likely to become more popular. As rechargeable cell technology improves they'll be able to travel further. You'll be seeing a lot more. As they're VERY low on emissions they'll be zero rated for VED once the Government/DVLA has to start recognizing them as personal transport rather than 'exclusively' for the disabled (and a very small minority of people who use them for convenience). Better get used to it.[/p][/quote]Yup. I was reading just last week about how global oil production has continued to fall at about 2% per year since 2007...it's just that demand is low because nobody has any money. I think as we claw our way out of this recession we will see oil prices rocketing and more and more electric cars on the road. JamesYoung
  • Score: 1

6:10pm Tue 29 Apr 14

JackJohnson says...

JamesYoung wrote:
JackJohnson wrote:
ziggystardust wrote:
Get a grip wrote:
Why are there so many of this type of scooter in Weymouth?

You do not see as many in other towns of the same size.
Because it supports their claims of being disabled.... I must be disabled, look I got a scooter to prove it.
What do you expect people to do to 'prove' they are disabled? Wear a badge? Why does it matter to you? For whatever reason they have a small electric vehicle. It's most likely a necessity or, for a few (at present), a lifestyle choice.

As fossil fuels become more expensive these very practical little vehicles are likely to become more popular. As rechargeable cell technology improves they'll be able to travel further. You'll be seeing a lot more. As they're VERY low on emissions they'll be zero rated for VED once the Government/DVLA has to start recognizing them as personal transport rather than 'exclusively' for the disabled (and a very small minority of people who use them for convenience).

Better get used to it.
Yup. I was reading just last week about how global oil production has continued to fall at about 2% per year since 2007...it's just that demand is low because nobody has any money. I think as we claw our way out of this recession we will see oil prices rocketing and more and more electric cars on the road.
Unfortunately, full size electrics are very expensive due to the battery packs in them. The batteries will, probably, need to be replaced roughly every five years unless the technology improves significantly.

For many people the way forward might well be a personal vehicle. Their choices will be:

- a bicycle. Ok if you have shower facilities at work, or your colleagues don't mind you smelling like a cowshed all day. Dangerous.
- an electic bicycle. This has a little more appeal, but still has the limited carrying capacity of a pedal cycle. Range still not great, but improving. A little less dangerous as less wobbling about while honking up big hills.
- an electric scooter. Convenient, and safer than two wheels. Better carrying capacity. If 15mph models are coming soon, expect them to become a lot more popular (especially if someone fits a small trailer for a larger weekly shop, tools for work, trip to the tip...)
- Electric ATV.

Even better would be improved public transport. Buses from my village didn't run from the village I live in to the last trading estate I worked on. I'd have had a three-quarter hour walk to get to it from the nearest stop. Even then, my shift started well before the first bus ran through the village. All quite pathetic, really.
[quote][p][bold]JamesYoung[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]JackJohnson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ziggystardust[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Get a grip[/bold] wrote: Why are there so many of this type of scooter in Weymouth? You do not see as many in other towns of the same size.[/p][/quote]Because it supports their claims of being disabled.... I must be disabled, look I got a scooter to prove it.[/p][/quote]What do you expect people to do to 'prove' they are disabled? Wear a badge? Why does it matter to you? For whatever reason they have a small electric vehicle. It's most likely a necessity or, for a few (at present), a lifestyle choice. As fossil fuels become more expensive these very practical little vehicles are likely to become more popular. As rechargeable cell technology improves they'll be able to travel further. You'll be seeing a lot more. As they're VERY low on emissions they'll be zero rated for VED once the Government/DVLA has to start recognizing them as personal transport rather than 'exclusively' for the disabled (and a very small minority of people who use them for convenience). Better get used to it.[/p][/quote]Yup. I was reading just last week about how global oil production has continued to fall at about 2% per year since 2007...it's just that demand is low because nobody has any money. I think as we claw our way out of this recession we will see oil prices rocketing and more and more electric cars on the road.[/p][/quote]Unfortunately, full size electrics are very expensive due to the battery packs in them. The batteries will, probably, need to be replaced roughly every five years unless the technology improves significantly. For many people the way forward might well be a personal vehicle. Their choices will be: - a bicycle. Ok if you have shower facilities at work, or your colleagues don't mind you smelling like a cowshed all day. Dangerous. - an electic bicycle. This has a little more appeal, but still has the limited carrying capacity of a pedal cycle. Range still not great, but improving. A little less dangerous as less wobbling about while honking up big hills. - an electric scooter. Convenient, and safer than two wheels. Better carrying capacity. If 15mph models are coming soon, expect them to become a lot more popular (especially if someone fits a small trailer for a larger weekly shop, tools for work, trip to the tip...) - Electric ATV. Even better would be improved public transport. Buses from my village didn't run from the village I live in to the last trading estate I worked on. I'd have had a three-quarter hour walk to get to it from the nearest stop. Even then, my shift started well before the first bus ran through the village. All quite pathetic, really. JackJohnson
  • Score: 1

9:35pm Tue 29 Apr 14

blobby96 says...

Get a grip wrote:
Fair point about incorrect spelling.

But I still maintain that many scooter users are inconsiderate at best or rude at worst.
they also expect you to get out of there way as if it is a good given right to ride on the pavement!, pavement,s were made to walk on originally not ride on ,they should be on the road
[quote][p][bold]Get a grip[/bold] wrote: Fair point about incorrect spelling. But I still maintain that many scooter users are inconsiderate at best or rude at worst.[/p][/quote]they also expect you to get out of there way as if it is a good given right to ride on the pavement!, pavement,s were made to walk on originally not ride on ,they should be on the road blobby96
  • Score: 1

2:55pm Wed 30 Apr 14

Crimbo says...

"Her daughter Lola Foot said: “Mum’s got lots of appointments for her back that she needs to get to. I don’t know what she’s going to do."

Well she could always use some of the Mobility Allowance and Disability Living Allowance to which her disability would entitle her by paying for taxis... Just a thought, but that's what people in our village have to do!
"Her daughter Lola Foot said: “Mum’s got lots of appointments for her back that she needs to get to. I don’t know what she’s going to do." Well she could always use some of the Mobility Allowance and Disability Living Allowance to which her disability would entitle her by paying for taxis... Just a thought, but that's what people in our village have to do! Crimbo
  • Score: 3

1:16am Thu 1 May 14

westbaywonder says...

Try the bus love, have they got the new ones with wi-fi and leather seats running through the land of Littlemoor yet?
Try the bus love, have they got the new ones with wi-fi and leather seats running through the land of Littlemoor yet? westbaywonder
  • Score: 3

10:49am Thu 1 May 14

nuttynews says...

For those of you who know nothing about Mrs Read. She is one of the few that does respect people on the paths. She always stops for dog walkers to pass, always slows right down when passing people in the street. People run faster than what she rides her scooter. She has suffered with problems in her spine for 10yrs, in which the problem was only diagnosed about 9 months ago after changing her Doctor. She had her house repossessed after a divorce, If you see her, you can tell she doesn't have money to spare. She wears a coat that should have stayed in the 80s with the retro look. She use to get the bus but she is in agony. by the time she gets to her destination, Mrs Read is then unable to move the following day. I shouldn't have to go into someones private life but not all people are bumming off Benefits. she doesn't claim disability or mobility, she is studying and looking for work. Yes I understand she should have got some sort of insurance but when people are strapped for cash, these things get put to the back of the pile. Just remember! Their is always going to be someone less fortunate than yourself. So Don't judge them unless you know the circumstances.
For those of you who know nothing about Mrs Read. She is one of the few that does respect people on the paths. She always stops for dog walkers to pass, always slows right down when passing people in the street. People run faster than what she rides her scooter. She has suffered with problems in her spine for 10yrs, in which the problem was only diagnosed about 9 months ago after changing her Doctor. She had her house repossessed after a divorce, If you see her, you can tell she doesn't have money to spare. She wears a coat that should have stayed in the 80s with the retro look. She use to get the bus but she is in agony. by the time she gets to her destination, Mrs Read is then unable to move the following day. I shouldn't have to go into someones private life but not all people are bumming off Benefits. she doesn't claim disability or mobility, she is studying and looking for work. Yes I understand she should have got some sort of insurance but when people are strapped for cash, these things get put to the back of the pile. Just remember! Their is always going to be someone less fortunate than yourself. So Don't judge them unless you know the circumstances. nuttynews
  • Score: -2

3:38pm Thu 1 May 14

Crimbo says...

nuttynews wrote:
For those of you who know nothing about Mrs Read. She is one of the few that does respect people on the paths. She always stops for dog walkers to pass, always slows right down when passing people in the street. People run faster than what she rides her scooter. She has suffered with problems in her spine for 10yrs, in which the problem was only diagnosed about 9 months ago after changing her Doctor. She had her house repossessed after a divorce, If you see her, you can tell she doesn't have money to spare. She wears a coat that should have stayed in the 80s with the retro look. She use to get the bus but she is in agony. by the time she gets to her destination, Mrs Read is then unable to move the following day. I shouldn't have to go into someones private life but not all people are bumming off Benefits. she doesn't claim disability or mobility, she is studying and looking for work. Yes I understand she should have got some sort of insurance but when people are strapped for cash, these things get put to the back of the pile. Just remember! Their is always going to be someone less fortunate than yourself. So Don't judge them unless you know the circumstances.
nuttiness says "she doesn't claim disability or mobility"?

Why ever not? Is she an idiot or is she faking the degree of disability. Services exist for genuinely disabled people and if she's as bad as she claims then she should use them, not go bleating to the papers about how tragic her life is...
[quote][p][bold]nuttynews[/bold] wrote: For those of you who know nothing about Mrs Read. She is one of the few that does respect people on the paths. She always stops for dog walkers to pass, always slows right down when passing people in the street. People run faster than what she rides her scooter. She has suffered with problems in her spine for 10yrs, in which the problem was only diagnosed about 9 months ago after changing her Doctor. She had her house repossessed after a divorce, If you see her, you can tell she doesn't have money to spare. She wears a coat that should have stayed in the 80s with the retro look. She use to get the bus but she is in agony. by the time she gets to her destination, Mrs Read is then unable to move the following day. I shouldn't have to go into someones private life but not all people are bumming off Benefits. she doesn't claim disability or mobility, she is studying and looking for work. Yes I understand she should have got some sort of insurance but when people are strapped for cash, these things get put to the back of the pile. Just remember! Their is always going to be someone less fortunate than yourself. So Don't judge them unless you know the circumstances.[/p][/quote]nuttiness says "she doesn't claim disability or mobility"? Why ever not? Is she an idiot or is she faking the degree of disability. Services exist for genuinely disabled people and if she's as bad as she claims then she should use them, not go bleating to the papers about how tragic her life is... Crimbo
  • Score: 5

5:33pm Fri 2 May 14

MaidofDorset says...

Someone in a mobility scooter deliberately rammed into the back of my friend legs. My friend turned to complain, and was told 'get out of the way, I'm disabled and sounded my hooter'. My friend is profoundly deaf and could neither hear the hooter or see the buggy coming up behind her.

These things should be licensed, have insurance and those who drive them without care and regard for other road and pavement users should be fined.They are a great aid for disabled people but the few self centred users cause a great deal of bad feeling towards mobility buggy riders.
Someone in a mobility scooter deliberately rammed into the back of my friend legs. My friend turned to complain, and was told 'get out of the way, I'm disabled and sounded my hooter'. My friend is profoundly deaf and could neither hear the hooter or see the buggy coming up behind her. These things should be licensed, have insurance and those who drive them without care and regard for other road and pavement users should be fined.They are a great aid for disabled people but the few self centred users cause a great deal of bad feeling towards mobility buggy riders. MaidofDorset
  • Score: 2

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