Giant jellyfish are swept into Wyke Regis cove

Dorset Echo: One of the barrel jellyfish One of the barrel jellyfish

IT’S not everyday that you walk along a Weymouth Beach and stumble across a giant jellyfish.

Kate Chard told the Echo that over the past few days more and more barrel jellyfish have been washing ashore at Pirate’s Cove in Wyke Regis.

But she says the one pictured is the biggest she’s seen so far, measuring three feet.

Dozens of them have appeared along the Dorset coast due to the spring tides and windy weather.

The 42-year-old Wyke Regis resident said: “This was definitely the biggest one I’ve seen. It was almost three feet in length.

“I spotted another seven there the day after.”

The sightings are relatively rare in coastal areas.

They have been reported in waters off Dorset and washed up on beaches.

Kate was on her daily walk with dogs Hector and Maisie when she came across the massive jellyfish.

Comments (7)

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12:16pm Sun 15 Jun 14

green army!! says...

These jellyfish are seen every year. Not really rare. I remember seeing them for at least the last 30 years. In the fleet and chesil beach.
These jellyfish are seen every year. Not really rare. I remember seeing them for at least the last 30 years. In the fleet and chesil beach. green army!!
  • Score: 4

12:48pm Sun 15 Jun 14

Get a grip says...

This why we need UKIP
This why we need UKIP Get a grip
  • Score: 4

9:57pm Sun 15 Jun 14

Harpya Orkinus says...

Rhizostoma pulmo, I expect - probably better known to all these days as Rhizostoma octopus !! I DO wish they didn't have to follow the Rules of Precedence with their taxonomy: it gets very troublesome having to keep learning new names for things all the time. Orcinus orca lived quite happily for MANY years under the far more charismatic name of Orca gladiator, but there you go - rules is RULES !!
Rhizostoma pulmo, I expect - probably better known to all these days as Rhizostoma octopus !! I DO wish they didn't have to follow the Rules of Precedence with their taxonomy: it gets very troublesome having to keep learning new names for things all the time. Orcinus orca lived quite happily for MANY years under the far more charismatic name of Orca gladiator, but there you go - rules is RULES !! Harpya Orkinus
  • Score: 1

11:29am Mon 16 Jun 14

Bob Goulding says...

Harpya Orkinus wrote:
Rhizostoma pulmo, I expect - probably better known to all these days as Rhizostoma octopus !! I DO wish they didn't have to follow the Rules of Precedence with their taxonomy: it gets very troublesome having to keep learning new names for things all the time. Orcinus orca lived quite happily for MANY years under the far more charismatic name of Orca gladiator, but there you go - rules is RULES !!
Or Killer Whale even....
[quote][p][bold]Harpya Orkinus[/bold] wrote: Rhizostoma pulmo, I expect - probably better known to all these days as Rhizostoma octopus !! I DO wish they didn't have to follow the Rules of Precedence with their taxonomy: it gets very troublesome having to keep learning new names for things all the time. Orcinus orca lived quite happily for MANY years under the far more charismatic name of Orca gladiator, but there you go - rules is RULES !![/p][/quote]Or Killer Whale even.... Bob Goulding
  • Score: 1

12:54pm Mon 16 Jun 14

chesilboy says...

Hundreds have appeared "due to the spring tides and windy weather"

What?

Spring tides occur every 2 weeks and, um, always have done. And, if anything, it's been a lot less windy in recent weeks that it normally is.

I think it is probably because it has been light during the day and dark at night. ;)
Hundreds have appeared "due to the spring tides and windy weather" What? Spring tides occur every 2 weeks and, um, always have done. And, if anything, it's been a lot less windy in recent weeks that it normally is. I think it is probably because it has been light during the day and dark at night. ;) chesilboy
  • Score: 8

2:33pm Mon 16 Jun 14

every user name was taken says...

"The sightings are relatively rare in coastal areas". But abundant inland.
"The sightings are relatively rare in coastal areas". But abundant inland. every user name was taken
  • Score: 2

5:15pm Mon 16 Jun 14

portland rebel says...

how is this news, how many more times does this need reporting. they have been about in the harbour for a couple of months now, and yes there are a few about most years.
how is this news, how many more times does this need reporting. they have been about in the harbour for a couple of months now, and yes there are a few about most years. portland rebel
  • Score: 0

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