Nuclear submarine to dock at Portland on six-day visit

LETHAL WEAPON: HMS Torbay is a  hunter killer submarine

LETHAL WEAPON: HMS Torbay is a hunter killer submarine

First published in News Dorset Echo: Photograph of the Author by , Reporter

A NUCLEAR-powered submarine will sail into Portland next week for a six-day visit.

Schoolchildren, sea cadets and potential Royal Navy recruits are set to pay a visit to HMS Torbay.

The hunter killer submarine is set to arrive on Tuesday when the ship’s company will have an opportunity for some well earned rest and recuperation.

It comes after Portland Port was home to a nuclear training exercise to test how the authorities would react in the case of an emergency.

Police, fire and naval officers took part in the project, known as Shortbill with emergency planning officers from Dorset County Council to run through procedures that are in place to cope with any radiation leak that may occur.

HMS Torbay will berth in Portland Port at noon and will host a reception on Wednesday evening for invited guests.

The submariner community ill also host members of the ship’s company on Thursday evening at the Royal Dorset Yacht Club in Weymouth.

HMS Torbay will also host a large number of organised tours for various groups of people from the local community whilst in Portland. These include pupils from Blandford School, Sir John Colfox School, Thomas Hardye School and the Dorset police.

In addition, the Armed Forces Careers Office is coordinating a number of visits each day for potential officer and rating recruits.

Commanding Officer Comman-der Andy Johns said: “I am really looking forward to our forthcoming visit to Portland as it will give HMS Torbay’s Ship Company the opportunity to reinvigorate ties with the town of Portland and the surrounding areas.

“During the visit, we will be welcoming groups of local schoolchildren and potential recruits onboard to experience firsthand what modern day life is like on a nuclear submarine. The visit is also a welcome opportunity for the crew to take some shore leave and enjoy the many attractions the surrounding area offers.”

HMS Torbay is entering her 25th year of service and can hear vessels over 50 miles away.

Comments (6)

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3:18pm Fri 4 Jul 14

PCAH says...

Not a good idea to take schoolchildren on board a nuclear submarine; better to move 50 miles away from Portland to avoid exposure to radiation from all the other nuclear submarines based there. Download the US Environment Protection Agency paper on health effects of radiation from: www.epa.gov/radiatio
n/radionuclides.
Not a good idea to take schoolchildren on board a nuclear submarine; better to move 50 miles away from Portland to avoid exposure to radiation from all the other nuclear submarines based there. Download the US Environment Protection Agency paper on health effects of radiation from: www.epa.gov/radiatio n/radionuclides. PCAH
  • Score: -16

4:22pm Fri 4 Jul 14

WykeReg says...

Why worry about radiation - there won't be any. This sub has been in service for 25 years and unless I've missed the news I haven't heard about mass deaths among crew members over those years.

The US Navy has many nuclear- powered subs and no significant problems have arisen there either. The Nimitz-class aircraft carriers along with the new Gerald R. Ford class are all nuclear powered and the early vessels (starting from hull CVN 68) have been in service for decades. The Royal Navy is sending 300 sailors for training aboard these carriers to prepare for the QE-class carrier entering service. The first 30 were trained on the USS Eisenhower (the "Ike") in the Arabian Gulf. They all returned safely (and somewhat awestruck at the complexity of operating a state-of-the-art carrier!!).

You can get more radiation from the luminous dial on your wristwatch. Be glad we can be safe.
Why worry about radiation - there won't be any. This sub has been in service for 25 years and unless I've missed the news I haven't heard about mass deaths among crew members over those years. The US Navy has many nuclear- powered subs and no significant problems have arisen there either. The Nimitz-class aircraft carriers along with the new Gerald R. Ford class are all nuclear powered and the early vessels (starting from hull CVN 68) have been in service for decades. The Royal Navy is sending 300 sailors for training aboard these carriers to prepare for the QE-class carrier entering service. The first 30 were trained on the USS Eisenhower (the "Ike") in the Arabian Gulf. They all returned safely (and somewhat awestruck at the complexity of operating a state-of-the-art carrier!!). You can get more radiation from the luminous dial on your wristwatch. Be glad we can be safe. WykeReg
  • Score: 9

8:18pm Fri 4 Jul 14

arlbergbahn says...

PCAH wrote:
Not a good idea to take schoolchildren on board a nuclear submarine; better to move 50 miles away from Portland to avoid exposure to radiation from all the other nuclear submarines based there. Download the US Environment Protection Agency paper on health effects of radiation from: www.epa.gov/radiatio

n/radionuclides.
ye gods, this sets new standards for paranoia.
[quote][p][bold]PCAH[/bold] wrote: Not a good idea to take schoolchildren on board a nuclear submarine; better to move 50 miles away from Portland to avoid exposure to radiation from all the other nuclear submarines based there. Download the US Environment Protection Agency paper on health effects of radiation from: www.epa.gov/radiatio n/radionuclides.[/p][/quote]ye gods, this sets new standards for paranoia. arlbergbahn
  • Score: 4

8:34pm Fri 4 Jul 14

jmc1 says...

WykeReg wrote:
Why worry about radiation - there won't be any. This sub has been in service for 25 years and unless I've missed the news I haven't heard about mass deaths among crew members over those years.

The US Navy has many nuclear- powered subs and no significant problems have arisen there either. The Nimitz-class aircraft carriers along with the new Gerald R. Ford class are all nuclear powered and the early vessels (starting from hull CVN 68) have been in service for decades. The Royal Navy is sending 300 sailors for training aboard these carriers to prepare for the QE-class carrier entering service. The first 30 were trained on the USS Eisenhower (the "Ike") in the Arabian Gulf. They all returned safely (and somewhat awestruck at the complexity of operating a state-of-the-art carrier!!).

You can get more radiation from the luminous dial on your wristwatch. Be glad we can be safe.
The queen Elizabeth carrier is not nuclear
[quote][p][bold]WykeReg[/bold] wrote: Why worry about radiation - there won't be any. This sub has been in service for 25 years and unless I've missed the news I haven't heard about mass deaths among crew members over those years. The US Navy has many nuclear- powered subs and no significant problems have arisen there either. The Nimitz-class aircraft carriers along with the new Gerald R. Ford class are all nuclear powered and the early vessels (starting from hull CVN 68) have been in service for decades. The Royal Navy is sending 300 sailors for training aboard these carriers to prepare for the QE-class carrier entering service. The first 30 were trained on the USS Eisenhower (the "Ike") in the Arabian Gulf. They all returned safely (and somewhat awestruck at the complexity of operating a state-of-the-art carrier!!). You can get more radiation from the luminous dial on your wristwatch. Be glad we can be safe.[/p][/quote]The queen Elizabeth carrier is not nuclear jmc1
  • Score: 0

10:32pm Fri 4 Jul 14

Get a grip says...

PCAH wrote:
Not a good idea to take schoolchildren on board a nuclear submarine; better to move 50 miles away from Portland to avoid exposure to radiation from all the other nuclear submarines based there. Download the US Environment Protection Agency paper on health effects of radiation from: www.epa.gov/radiatio

n/radionuclides.
And then you have to worry about the little green men from outer space.
[quote][p][bold]PCAH[/bold] wrote: Not a good idea to take schoolchildren on board a nuclear submarine; better to move 50 miles away from Portland to avoid exposure to radiation from all the other nuclear submarines based there. Download the US Environment Protection Agency paper on health effects of radiation from: www.epa.gov/radiatio n/radionuclides.[/p][/quote]And then you have to worry about the little green men from outer space. Get a grip
  • Score: 0

11:56am Sat 5 Jul 14

WykeReg says...

jmc1 wrote:
WykeReg wrote:
Why worry about radiation - there won't be any. This sub has been in service for 25 years and unless I've missed the news I haven't heard about mass deaths among crew members over those years.

The US Navy has many nuclear- powered subs and no significant problems have arisen there either. The Nimitz-class aircraft carriers along with the new Gerald R. Ford class are all nuclear powered and the early vessels (starting from hull CVN 68) have been in service for decades. The Royal Navy is sending 300 sailors for training aboard these carriers to prepare for the QE-class carrier entering service. The first 30 were trained on the USS Eisenhower (the "Ike") in the Arabian Gulf. They all returned safely (and somewhat awestruck at the complexity of operating a state-of-the-art carrier!!).

You can get more radiation from the luminous dial on your wristwatch. Be glad we can be safe.
The queen Elizabeth carrier is not nuclear
I didn't say it was nuclear, merely pointing out that some of its future crew members have been trained on a nuclear-powered carrier.
[quote][p][bold]jmc1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]WykeReg[/bold] wrote: Why worry about radiation - there won't be any. This sub has been in service for 25 years and unless I've missed the news I haven't heard about mass deaths among crew members over those years. The US Navy has many nuclear- powered subs and no significant problems have arisen there either. The Nimitz-class aircraft carriers along with the new Gerald R. Ford class are all nuclear powered and the early vessels (starting from hull CVN 68) have been in service for decades. The Royal Navy is sending 300 sailors for training aboard these carriers to prepare for the QE-class carrier entering service. The first 30 were trained on the USS Eisenhower (the "Ike") in the Arabian Gulf. They all returned safely (and somewhat awestruck at the complexity of operating a state-of-the-art carrier!!). You can get more radiation from the luminous dial on your wristwatch. Be glad we can be safe.[/p][/quote]The queen Elizabeth carrier is not nuclear[/p][/quote]I didn't say it was nuclear, merely pointing out that some of its future crew members have been trained on a nuclear-powered carrier. WykeReg
  • Score: 2

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