Campaigners lend support to wind farm plan

SAY YES TO TURBINES: The Slyers Lane Clean Energy Group

SAY YES TO TURBINES: The Slyers Lane Clean Energy Group

First published in News
Last updated
Dorset Echo: Photograph of the Author by , Dorchester reporter

A CAMPAIGN group has been set up to show support for a proposed wind farm near Charminster.

Broadview Energy is planning to erect six wind turbines on land at Slyer’s Lane and the proposals have provoked a mixed reaction from the village.

The No Slyer’s Lanes Turbines group was set up by residents opposed to the proposed scheme.

However, a new group has been formed to highlight the benefits of clean energy to the local environment.

The Slyer’s Lane Clean Energy Group has now been launched after a meeting of residents to consider the impact of the wind farm. Broadview claims the six turbines will produce enough energy to provide electricity for the equivalent of up to 80 per cent of the homes in Dorchester.

Kerry Mellor, a member of Slyer’s Lane Clean Energy Group said: “We believe it’s a win-win situation for our energy supply and the environment and we’re calling on residents to support the Slyer’s Lane planning application.

“Energy from Slyer’s Lane would be clean, renewable energy that’s produced safely and that makes a contribution to the UK’s energy security.

“Our local area would also benefit from a ‘community fund’, which Broadview Energy has pledged to annually contribute a minimum of £60,000.”

A parish council survey carried out last year demonstrated that most people in Charminster and nearby Charlton Down, are ambivalent about the proposals and the remainder are fairly evenly split between ‘pro’ and ‘anti’ wind energy.

Kerry said: “A prominent ‘anti-wind’ campaign is skewing the debate.

“Residents also need to hear about the many benefits that wind power offers.

“The Slyer’s Lane Clean Energy Group has been set up to give a voice to those in the village who support clean energy production in our area.

“For the sake of our environment and the world at large, we – and many other communities like ours – must embrace wind power and do our bit towards securing the future.”

Pleased with support

A SPOKESMAN for Broadview said it was pleased with the support from the community.

They said: “We’re pleased that members of the community recognise the benefits.

“Sadly, often those who want to support a progressive, sustainable and independent energy future get shouted down by a vocal minority.

“National polls have consistently shown majority support for wind power and the feedback we have received through our numerous consultation activities has shown us that there is local support for our proposal.”

Comments (8)

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12:58pm Fri 1 Aug 14

Caption Sensible says...

So what happens when the wind doesn't blow? And your energy bills go sky high?

Intermittent power supply at twice the price - sounds rational to me...
So what happens when the wind doesn't blow? And your energy bills go sky high? Intermittent power supply at twice the price - sounds rational to me... Caption Sensible
  • Score: 4

4:52pm Fri 1 Aug 14

mr commonsense says...

Please count me in, as at last somebody understands the need for wind as PART of our energy supplies, perhaps the previous correspondent instead of making a totally subjective comment will sit down and write to the echo in the darkness in the next 5/10 years when power is turned off.
Please count me in, as at last somebody understands the need for wind as PART of our energy supplies, perhaps the previous correspondent instead of making a totally subjective comment will sit down and write to the echo in the darkness in the next 5/10 years when power is turned off. mr commonsense
  • Score: -4

7:26pm Fri 1 Aug 14

Countryside Guardian says...

Broadview's comment ignores the recent DECC study which says that the majority of people prefer Offshore Wind and Solar Power whilst Onshore comes third.
As far as local wind plans are concerned by far the vocal majority object to present proposals and have done so since first proposed.
Broadview's comment ignores the recent DECC study which says that the majority of people prefer Offshore Wind and Solar Power whilst Onshore comes third. As far as local wind plans are concerned by far the vocal majority object to present proposals and have done so since first proposed. Countryside Guardian
  • Score: 6

8:27am Sat 2 Aug 14

Caption Sensible says...

mr commonsense wrote:
Please count me in, as at last somebody understands the need for wind as PART of our energy supplies, perhaps the previous correspondent instead of making a totally subjective comment will sit down and write to the echo in the darkness in the next 5/10 years when power is turned off.
Nothing subjective about my comments, I am a power engineer (Chartered) by profession. Wind power is pretty much the most least efficient form of energy production there is.

If you go for wind you definitely will be sat in the dark (and the cold).
[quote][p][bold]mr commonsense[/bold] wrote: Please count me in, as at last somebody understands the need for wind as PART of our energy supplies, perhaps the previous correspondent instead of making a totally subjective comment will sit down and write to the echo in the darkness in the next 5/10 years when power is turned off.[/p][/quote]Nothing subjective about my comments, I am a power engineer (Chartered) by profession. Wind power is pretty much the most least efficient form of energy production there is. If you go for wind you definitely will be sat in the dark (and the cold). Caption Sensible
  • Score: 3

8:27am Sat 2 Aug 14

Caption Sensible says...

mr commonsense wrote:
Please count me in, as at last somebody understands the need for wind as PART of our energy supplies, perhaps the previous correspondent instead of making a totally subjective comment will sit down and write to the echo in the darkness in the next 5/10 years when power is turned off.
Nothing subjective about my comments, I am a power engineer (Chartered) by profession. Wind power is pretty much the most least efficient form of energy production there is.

If you go for wind you definitely will be sat in the dark (and the cold).
[quote][p][bold]mr commonsense[/bold] wrote: Please count me in, as at last somebody understands the need for wind as PART of our energy supplies, perhaps the previous correspondent instead of making a totally subjective comment will sit down and write to the echo in the darkness in the next 5/10 years when power is turned off.[/p][/quote]Nothing subjective about my comments, I am a power engineer (Chartered) by profession. Wind power is pretty much the most least efficient form of energy production there is. If you go for wind you definitely will be sat in the dark (and the cold). Caption Sensible
  • Score: 2

10:06am Sun 3 Aug 14

Alex Emery says...

Wind farms could be used alongside with other forms of renewble energy.. The wind does blow and wind turbines do produce energy although I agree it can be variable and sometimes unpredictable but used with other types or renewables it could be a really effective and a positive thing. Everyone should be embracing renewables and working towards trying to preserve our future with safer options of energy. Nuclear is all very well but what happens to the waste produced afterwards.. where should that go? There's a massive solar farm near Dorchester.. combine that with a bit of wind power and biomass and we could be getting somewhere..
Wind farms could be used alongside with other forms of renewble energy.. The wind does blow and wind turbines do produce energy although I agree it can be variable and sometimes unpredictable but used with other types or renewables it could be a really effective and a positive thing. Everyone should be embracing renewables and working towards trying to preserve our future with safer options of energy. Nuclear is all very well but what happens to the waste produced afterwards.. where should that go? There's a massive solar farm near Dorchester.. combine that with a bit of wind power and biomass and we could be getting somewhere.. Alex Emery
  • Score: -2

9:23am Mon 4 Aug 14

GPWool says...

Caption Sensible wrote:
mr commonsense wrote: Please count me in, as at last somebody understands the need for wind as PART of our energy supplies, perhaps the previous correspondent instead of making a totally subjective comment will sit down and write to the echo in the darkness in the next 5/10 years when power is turned off.
Nothing subjective about my comments, I am a power engineer (Chartered) by profession. Wind power is pretty much the most least efficient form of energy production there is. If you go for wind you definitely will be sat in the dark (and the cold).
sorry Caption, you are no engineer, an engineer would realise the difference between efficiency and intermittentcy. Actually modern wind turbines are fairly efficient at converting wind energy into electrical energy. AND IF, you were an engineer, you would know that storage technologies are developing so fast now that balancing the grid is not a problem.
Wind farms are a vital component of our energy mix and it's heartening to see people recognising the long overdue need to abandon fossil fuels.
[quote][p][bold]Caption Sensible[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mr commonsense[/bold] wrote: Please count me in, as at last somebody understands the need for wind as PART of our energy supplies, perhaps the previous correspondent instead of making a totally subjective comment will sit down and write to the echo in the darkness in the next 5/10 years when power is turned off.[/p][/quote]Nothing subjective about my comments, I am a power engineer (Chartered) by profession. Wind power is pretty much the most least efficient form of energy production there is. If you go for wind you definitely will be sat in the dark (and the cold).[/p][/quote]sorry Caption, you are no engineer, an engineer would realise the difference between efficiency and intermittentcy. Actually modern wind turbines are fairly efficient at converting wind energy into electrical energy. AND IF, you were an engineer, you would know that storage technologies are developing so fast now that balancing the grid is not a problem. Wind farms are a vital component of our energy mix and it's heartening to see people recognising the long overdue need to abandon fossil fuels. GPWool
  • Score: -3

5:42pm Mon 4 Aug 14

Budgie@home says...

I drove down to Cornwall and back last Wednesday as I do twice a year on business and was shocked to see the number of individual turbines that have been erected since February no doubt earning vast sums for the land owner and developer. Including the familiar array just before you get to Truro only one was vaguely turning on the way down and two vaguely turning on the way back. This is a pathetic waste of money and a politicians ill thought out policy similar to the encouragement to drive diesel cars which has proved to have back fired.
I drove down to Cornwall and back last Wednesday as I do twice a year on business and was shocked to see the number of individual turbines that have been erected since February no doubt earning vast sums for the land owner and developer. Including the familiar array just before you get to Truro only one was vaguely turning on the way down and two vaguely turning on the way back. This is a pathetic waste of money and a politicians ill thought out policy similar to the encouragement to drive diesel cars which has proved to have back fired. Budgie@home
  • Score: 4

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