Latest plans for Crossways holiday home development go on show

Villagers view proposals for holiday home project

Villagers view proposals for holiday home project

First published in News

THE LATEST plans for a 1,000 holiday home development at Crossways are going on show in the village.

Developers Habitat First Group are inviting local residents along to the village hall from 7.30pm on Monday, August 4, to keep them informed of the latest proposals for its Silverlake site.

The group was granted outline planning permission to transform the 560-acres Warmwell Quarry site into a sustainable holiday park in January.

The plans will see hundreds of jobs created in the area and see millions of pounds invested in the local economy.

Habitat First managing director Will Vicary said the evening event would give people the chance to see some of the latest design concepts and to update residents on the planning process to date and the timeframe for development.

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5:32pm Sat 2 Aug 14

Harpya Orkinus says...

Do I understand this correctly ?? Are these Terry Fickwutts proposing to turn what ought to be restored heathland - one of the most endangered habitats in Europa - into a money-making venture ?? I thought the idea was to eventually reconnect all the tiny, shattered fragments of what was ONCE Thomas Hardy's Great Heath or Egdon Heath into one inviolable amenity for Nature again ?? If you look at the five maps on p 44 of Nigel Webb's *Heathlands* (Collins New Naturalist, 1986), the trashing of the heathlands of the Poole Basin from 1759, when it must have been a wonderful sight to behold, to the last map featured, 1978, when all that is left is a pitiable remnant, then the importance of every last scrap of former heathland becomes obvious and clear to all but the most obtuse dunderhead (tories and economists, perhaps??!!)
And as for the Crossways area itself, that was once a little airfield, later sadly abandoned, to become a favorite place for fathers to take wives and/or offspring for some safe, basic instruction in driving. Its loss as an airfield may not have been QUITE so bad if we still had the alternative field, which lay under what is now the Granby Industrial Estate - which would have been an excellent, conveniently located venue for locals to learn to fly. As ever, quality of life is sacrificed in the interests of the useless multiplication, the utterly pointless maximization, of our species' numbers. Too late, the majority of us will realise the true value of heathlands, as a sublime and tranquil place in which to escape the vexatious stress inflicted upon us by the sheer numbers of other people and their dogs. We OUGHT to be able to visit heaths and seldom see another person, save for the occasional naturalist engaged in studying and photographing the unique and precious species to be found there....
Do I understand this correctly ?? Are these Terry Fickwutts proposing to turn what ought to be restored heathland - one of the most endangered habitats in Europa - into a money-making venture ?? I thought the idea was to eventually reconnect all the tiny, shattered fragments of what was ONCE Thomas Hardy's Great Heath or Egdon Heath into one inviolable amenity for Nature again ?? If you look at the five maps on p 44 of Nigel Webb's *Heathlands* (Collins New Naturalist, 1986), the trashing of the heathlands of the Poole Basin from 1759, when it must have been a wonderful sight to behold, to the last map featured, 1978, when all that is left is a pitiable remnant, then the importance of every last scrap of former heathland becomes obvious and clear to all but the most obtuse dunderhead (tories and economists, perhaps??!!) And as for the Crossways area itself, that was once a little airfield, later sadly abandoned, to become a favorite place for fathers to take wives and/or offspring for some safe, basic instruction in driving. Its loss as an airfield may not have been QUITE so bad if we still had the alternative field, which lay under what is now the Granby Industrial Estate - which would have been an excellent, conveniently located venue for locals to learn to fly. As ever, quality of life is sacrificed in the interests of the useless multiplication, the utterly pointless maximization, of our species' numbers. Too late, the majority of us will realise the true value of heathlands, as a sublime and tranquil place in which to escape the vexatious stress inflicted upon us by the sheer numbers of other people and their dogs. We OUGHT to be able to visit heaths and seldom see another person, save for the occasional naturalist engaged in studying and photographing the unique and precious species to be found there.... Harpya Orkinus
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