UPDATE: Funding announced for 20mph zones in Weymouth and Dorchester - but it's not enough

Funding announced for 20mph zones in Weymouth and Dorchester town centres

Funding announced for 20mph zones in Weymouth and Dorchester town centres

First published in News
Last updated

COUNCIL chiefs have missed out on funding to introduce 20mph traffic calming zones in Weymouth, Portland and Dorchester.

The government heralded the announcement of funding for seven different sustainable transport projects around the country – including £64,000 for Dorset County Council.

But it is only a fraction of what the council was looking for to progress its plans.

The money will enable DCC to consult with communities, carry out studies and design plans – but it’s not enough to build anything. More funding will have to be sought to implement the schemes, which will be introduced where communities want them.

The only area where a zone can be introduced is Westham in Weymouth where money was secured earlier this year to introduce a scheme.

The 20mph zones incorporating traffic calming measures like speed humps and chicanes is an initiative being promoted by the government and since 1999 it has given highway authorities the powers to introduce them. They would be in residential areas or areas where there are lots of pedestrians such as around schools and shops.

The 20mph limit is actually not enforceable but evidence shows traffic slows down in these zones.

DCC’s head of highways Andrew Martin said the original bid for government funding was for £415,000.

He said: “The £64,000 that we have been awarded from the Local Sustainable Transport Fund will be used towards the feasibility and development of 20mph speed limits in Weymouth, Portland and Dorchester.

“This money will be used to consult local residents, to carry out feasibility studies and design schemes.

“The original bid would have provided the capital funding to construct a number of schemes.”

Comments (18)

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11:55am Fri 8 Aug 14

caapprentice says...

It is difficult to exceed 20 mph anyway in Weymouth and Dorchester town centres as St. Thomas Street and South Street are both pedestrianised and traffic flow around adjacent streets doesn't enable traffic to move much faster, especially with the aid of the 'intelligent' traffic lights!
Transport Minister Baroness Kramer said: "Encouraging more people to cycle or use public transport makes sense for local economies
I can't imagine public transport being allowed to run in either St. Thomas Street or South Street although cyclists do currently use those roads without let or hindrance.
20 mph zones mean that the traffic will be slowed and remain emitting noxious fumes for longer in town centres.
It is difficult to exceed 20 mph anyway in Weymouth and Dorchester town centres as St. Thomas Street and South Street are both pedestrianised and traffic flow around adjacent streets doesn't enable traffic to move much faster, especially with the aid of the 'intelligent' traffic lights! Transport Minister Baroness Kramer said: "Encouraging more people to cycle or use public transport makes sense for local economies I can't imagine public transport being allowed to run in either St. Thomas Street or South Street although cyclists do currently use those roads without let or hindrance. 20 mph zones mean that the traffic will be slowed and remain emitting noxious fumes for longer in town centres. caapprentice
  • Score: 8

1:09pm Fri 8 Aug 14

tedbungy says...

caapprentice wrote:
It is difficult to exceed 20 mph anyway in Weymouth and Dorchester town centres as St. Thomas Street and South Street are both pedestrianised and traffic flow around adjacent streets doesn't enable traffic to move much faster, especially with the aid of the 'intelligent' traffic lights!
Transport Minister Baroness Kramer said: "Encouraging more people to cycle or use public transport makes sense for local economies
I can't imagine public transport being allowed to run in either St. Thomas Street or South Street although cyclists do currently use those roads without let or hindrance.
20 mph zones mean that the traffic will be slowed and remain emitting noxious fumes for longer in town centres.
Got to agree it the housin estates we need the 20MPH
[quote][p][bold]caapprentice[/bold] wrote: It is difficult to exceed 20 mph anyway in Weymouth and Dorchester town centres as St. Thomas Street and South Street are both pedestrianised and traffic flow around adjacent streets doesn't enable traffic to move much faster, especially with the aid of the 'intelligent' traffic lights! Transport Minister Baroness Kramer said: "Encouraging more people to cycle or use public transport makes sense for local economies I can't imagine public transport being allowed to run in either St. Thomas Street or South Street although cyclists do currently use those roads without let or hindrance. 20 mph zones mean that the traffic will be slowed and remain emitting noxious fumes for longer in town centres.[/p][/quote]Got to agree it the housin estates we need the 20MPH tedbungy
  • Score: -4

1:29pm Fri 8 Aug 14

melcombe boy says...

caapprentice wrote:
It is difficult to exceed 20 mph anyway in Weymouth and Dorchester town centres as St. Thomas Street and South Street are both pedestrianised and traffic flow around adjacent streets doesn't enable traffic to move much faster, especially with the aid of the 'intelligent' traffic lights!
Transport Minister Baroness Kramer said: "Encouraging more people to cycle or use public transport makes sense for local economies
I can't imagine public transport being allowed to run in either St. Thomas Street or South Street although cyclists do currently use those roads without let or hindrance.
20 mph zones mean that the traffic will be slowed and remain emitting noxious fumes for longer in town centres.
That just isn't true.
[quote][p][bold]caapprentice[/bold] wrote: It is difficult to exceed 20 mph anyway in Weymouth and Dorchester town centres as St. Thomas Street and South Street are both pedestrianised and traffic flow around adjacent streets doesn't enable traffic to move much faster, especially with the aid of the 'intelligent' traffic lights! Transport Minister Baroness Kramer said: "Encouraging more people to cycle or use public transport makes sense for local economies I can't imagine public transport being allowed to run in either St. Thomas Street or South Street although cyclists do currently use those roads without let or hindrance. 20 mph zones mean that the traffic will be slowed and remain emitting noxious fumes for longer in town centres.[/p][/quote]That just isn't true. melcombe boy
  • Score: -7

1:49pm Fri 8 Aug 14

bargain price says...

melcombe boy wrote:
caapprentice wrote:
It is difficult to exceed 20 mph anyway in Weymouth and Dorchester town centres as St. Thomas Street and South Street are both pedestrianised and traffic flow around adjacent streets doesn't enable traffic to move much faster, especially with the aid of the 'intelligent' traffic lights!
Transport Minister Baroness Kramer said: "Encouraging more people to cycle or use public transport makes sense for local economies
I can't imagine public transport being allowed to run in either St. Thomas Street or South Street although cyclists do currently use those roads without let or hindrance.
20 mph zones mean that the traffic will be slowed and remain emitting noxious fumes for longer in town centres.
That just isn't true.
and your proofs is?????????
[quote][p][bold]melcombe boy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]caapprentice[/bold] wrote: It is difficult to exceed 20 mph anyway in Weymouth and Dorchester town centres as St. Thomas Street and South Street are both pedestrianised and traffic flow around adjacent streets doesn't enable traffic to move much faster, especially with the aid of the 'intelligent' traffic lights! Transport Minister Baroness Kramer said: "Encouraging more people to cycle or use public transport makes sense for local economies I can't imagine public transport being allowed to run in either St. Thomas Street or South Street although cyclists do currently use those roads without let or hindrance. 20 mph zones mean that the traffic will be slowed and remain emitting noxious fumes for longer in town centres.[/p][/quote]That just isn't true.[/p][/quote]and your proofs is????????? bargain price
  • Score: 2

1:55pm Fri 8 Aug 14

3rdAccount says...

64k, well that might be enough for 1x 20mph sign after squandering it on planning, consultations, meetings and lots of red tape......
64k, well that might be enough for 1x 20mph sign after squandering it on planning, consultations, meetings and lots of red tape...... 3rdAccount
  • Score: 17

2:21pm Fri 8 Aug 14

caapprentice says...

I have just had to go into the centre of Weymouth and I suggest that Transport Minister Baroness Kramer or one of her hangers on, samples the traffic in Weymouth at the height of the season. More stationary than moving so I don't understand what good a 20 mph limit would do!
I agree with the comment of 3rdAccount, the money will be squandered.
I have just had to go into the centre of Weymouth and I suggest that Transport Minister Baroness Kramer or one of her hangers on, samples the traffic in Weymouth at the height of the season. More stationary than moving so I don't understand what good a 20 mph limit would do! I agree with the comment of 3rdAccount, the money will be squandered. caapprentice
  • Score: 3

3:33pm Fri 8 Aug 14

melcombe boy says...

bargain price wrote:
melcombe boy wrote:
caapprentice wrote:
It is difficult to exceed 20 mph anyway in Weymouth and Dorchester town centres as St. Thomas Street and South Street are both pedestrianised and traffic flow around adjacent streets doesn't enable traffic to move much faster, especially with the aid of the 'intelligent' traffic lights!
Transport Minister Baroness Kramer said: "Encouraging more people to cycle or use public transport makes sense for local economies
I can't imagine public transport being allowed to run in either St. Thomas Street or South Street although cyclists do currently use those roads without let or hindrance.
20 mph zones mean that the traffic will be slowed and remain emitting noxious fumes for longer in town centres.
That just isn't true.
and your proofs is?????????
Slowing traffic down improves the flow and causes less bottlenecks. That's why variable speed limits are used in many places in the UK and Europe when the traffic gets heavy.
A slow steady flow causes far less toxic fumes than heavy acceleration, rush and stop.
[quote][p][bold]bargain price[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]melcombe boy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]caapprentice[/bold] wrote: It is difficult to exceed 20 mph anyway in Weymouth and Dorchester town centres as St. Thomas Street and South Street are both pedestrianised and traffic flow around adjacent streets doesn't enable traffic to move much faster, especially with the aid of the 'intelligent' traffic lights! Transport Minister Baroness Kramer said: "Encouraging more people to cycle or use public transport makes sense for local economies I can't imagine public transport being allowed to run in either St. Thomas Street or South Street although cyclists do currently use those roads without let or hindrance. 20 mph zones mean that the traffic will be slowed and remain emitting noxious fumes for longer in town centres.[/p][/quote]That just isn't true.[/p][/quote]and your proofs is?????????[/p][/quote]Slowing traffic down improves the flow and causes less bottlenecks. That's why variable speed limits are used in many places in the UK and Europe when the traffic gets heavy. A slow steady flow causes far less toxic fumes than heavy acceleration, rush and stop. melcombe boy
  • Score: 0

3:36pm Fri 8 Aug 14

melcombe boy says...

bargain price wrote:
melcombe boy wrote:
caapprentice wrote:
It is difficult to exceed 20 mph anyway in Weymouth and Dorchester town centres as St. Thomas Street and South Street are both pedestrianised and traffic flow around adjacent streets doesn't enable traffic to move much faster, especially with the aid of the 'intelligent' traffic lights!
Transport Minister Baroness Kramer said: "Encouraging more people to cycle or use public transport makes sense for local economies
I can't imagine public transport being allowed to run in either St. Thomas Street or South Street although cyclists do currently use those roads without let or hindrance.
20 mph zones mean that the traffic will be slowed and remain emitting noxious fumes for longer in town centres.
That just isn't true.
and your proofs is?????????
ps..@bargain price.
Why not ask caapprentice to prove his theory.
[quote][p][bold]bargain price[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]melcombe boy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]caapprentice[/bold] wrote: It is difficult to exceed 20 mph anyway in Weymouth and Dorchester town centres as St. Thomas Street and South Street are both pedestrianised and traffic flow around adjacent streets doesn't enable traffic to move much faster, especially with the aid of the 'intelligent' traffic lights! Transport Minister Baroness Kramer said: "Encouraging more people to cycle or use public transport makes sense for local economies I can't imagine public transport being allowed to run in either St. Thomas Street or South Street although cyclists do currently use those roads without let or hindrance. 20 mph zones mean that the traffic will be slowed and remain emitting noxious fumes for longer in town centres.[/p][/quote]That just isn't true.[/p][/quote]and your proofs is?????????[/p][/quote]ps..@bargain price. Why not ask caapprentice to prove his theory. melcombe boy
  • Score: 3

4:44pm Fri 8 Aug 14

MrTomSmith says...

Well looks like the 64,000 is going to be used on feasibility studies ....... I give up, SIXTY FOUR THOUSAND!! Unbelievable.
Well looks like the 64,000 is going to be used on feasibility studies ....... I give up, SIXTY FOUR THOUSAND!! Unbelievable. MrTomSmith
  • Score: 0

5:17pm Fri 8 Aug 14

Mo471 says...

What a waste of money. Spend it on tarmac for Crescent Street in Weymouth. It's a nightmare trying to cycle along. The esplanade to too dangerous, so Crescent street would be much safer.
What a waste of money. Spend it on tarmac for Crescent Street in Weymouth. It's a nightmare trying to cycle along. The esplanade to too dangerous, so Crescent street would be much safer. Mo471
  • Score: 2

9:26pm Fri 8 Aug 14

Parkstreetshufle says...

With the condor going there is no reason to even have domestic transport in town unless you are disabled. They should shut the harbor to cars and make everyone walk or ride a bike if they have to get into town. Job done.
With the condor going there is no reason to even have domestic transport in town unless you are disabled. They should shut the harbor to cars and make everyone walk or ride a bike if they have to get into town. Job done. Parkstreetshufle
  • Score: -4

7:45am Sat 9 Aug 14

Caption Sensible says...

I would love to be able to travel at 20 mph in central Weymouth!
I would love to be able to travel at 20 mph in central Weymouth! Caption Sensible
  • Score: 4

8:35am Sat 9 Aug 14

caapprentice says...

melcombe boy says...A slow steady flow causes far less toxic fumes than heavy acceleration, rush and stop.

A 5 mph limit would not have caused less toxic fumes yesterday when (despite the dull weather) the traffic was nose to tail along from Alexander Gardens with more vehicles attempting to enter from side roads.
It is seldom that we ever get 'slow steady flows' in Weymouth anyway and I fail to see what the imposition of a 20 mph limit would gain.
It might be beneficial in larger towns but there does not seem to be a reason to quander taxpayers (our) money locally.
melcombe boy says...A slow steady flow causes far less toxic fumes than heavy acceleration, rush and stop. A 5 mph limit would not have caused less toxic fumes yesterday when (despite the dull weather) the traffic was nose to tail along from Alexander Gardens with more vehicles attempting to enter from side roads. It is seldom that we ever get 'slow steady flows' in Weymouth anyway and I fail to see what the imposition of a 20 mph limit would gain. It might be beneficial in larger towns but there does not seem to be a reason to quander taxpayers (our) money locally. caapprentice
  • Score: 0

12:36pm Sat 9 Aug 14

caapprentice says...

I notice that the whole of this article has been rewritten with all mention of Transport Minister Baroness Kramer taken out! Was what she has supposed to have said unpalatable or was it not true that 20 mph zones were to be established in the centres of Weymouth and Dorchester?
I notice that the whole of this article has been rewritten with all mention of Transport Minister Baroness Kramer taken out! Was what she has supposed to have said unpalatable or was it not true that 20 mph zones were to be established in the centres of Weymouth and Dorchester? caapprentice
  • Score: 1

4:17pm Sat 9 Aug 14

Eddi252 says...

Agree that 20mph limits in residential areas makes sense for safety, but it depends on the drivers. The way they drive through Goldcroft Rd means that the either do not know there is a limit, which in itself means they drive blind or they don't give a **** about the limits imposed. I have yet to see a police speed check done there. Also at the roundabout leading to this road, drivers on the inside lane shoot across to cut up into Goldcroft, regardless of the fact that the road marking distinctly indicates left turn to Weymouth Town Centre, not right.
Agree that 20mph limits in residential areas makes sense for safety, but it depends on the drivers. The way they drive through Goldcroft Rd means that the either do not know there is a limit, which in itself means they drive blind or they don't give a **** about the limits imposed. I have yet to see a police speed check done there. Also at the roundabout leading to this road, drivers on the inside lane shoot across to cut up into Goldcroft, regardless of the fact that the road marking distinctly indicates left turn to Weymouth Town Centre, not right. Eddi252
  • Score: -3

10:57am Wed 13 Aug 14

tarka says...

Parkstreetshufle no matter what the subject you can be relied upon to get cycling and your hate of the motorist into it somewhere, it’s as predictable as the sunrise but as boring as a wet summer.
Parkstreetshufle no matter what the subject you can be relied upon to get cycling and your hate of the motorist into it somewhere, it’s as predictable as the sunrise but as boring as a wet summer. tarka
  • Score: 4

3:40pm Wed 13 Aug 14

cj07589 says...

melcombe boy wrote:
bargain price wrote:
melcombe boy wrote:
caapprentice wrote:
It is difficult to exceed 20 mph anyway in Weymouth and Dorchester town centres as St. Thomas Street and South Street are both pedestrianised and traffic flow around adjacent streets doesn't enable traffic to move much faster, especially with the aid of the 'intelligent' traffic lights!
Transport Minister Baroness Kramer said: "Encouraging more people to cycle or use public transport makes sense for local economies
I can't imagine public transport being allowed to run in either St. Thomas Street or South Street although cyclists do currently use those roads without let or hindrance.
20 mph zones mean that the traffic will be slowed and remain emitting noxious fumes for longer in town centres.
That just isn't true.
and your proofs is?????????
Slowing traffic down improves the flow and causes less bottlenecks. That's why variable speed limits are used in many places in the UK and Europe when the traffic gets heavy.
A slow steady flow causes far less toxic fumes than heavy acceleration, rush and stop.
Yes on the motorway this would be correct but I'm not convinced this is the case in start & stop inner city/town rolling traffic conditions. Surely if a vehicle sits in slow moving traffic the idling engine revolutions won't be very efficient . I expect it would also depend on the age of car you drive too and whether it is one of these new Eco-cars with tiny powerless engines.
[quote][p][bold]melcombe boy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bargain price[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]melcombe boy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]caapprentice[/bold] wrote: It is difficult to exceed 20 mph anyway in Weymouth and Dorchester town centres as St. Thomas Street and South Street are both pedestrianised and traffic flow around adjacent streets doesn't enable traffic to move much faster, especially with the aid of the 'intelligent' traffic lights! Transport Minister Baroness Kramer said: "Encouraging more people to cycle or use public transport makes sense for local economies I can't imagine public transport being allowed to run in either St. Thomas Street or South Street although cyclists do currently use those roads without let or hindrance. 20 mph zones mean that the traffic will be slowed and remain emitting noxious fumes for longer in town centres.[/p][/quote]That just isn't true.[/p][/quote]and your proofs is?????????[/p][/quote]Slowing traffic down improves the flow and causes less bottlenecks. That's why variable speed limits are used in many places in the UK and Europe when the traffic gets heavy. A slow steady flow causes far less toxic fumes than heavy acceleration, rush and stop.[/p][/quote]Yes on the motorway this would be correct but I'm not convinced this is the case in start & stop inner city/town rolling traffic conditions. Surely if a vehicle sits in slow moving traffic the idling engine revolutions won't be very efficient . I expect it would also depend on the age of car you drive too and whether it is one of these new Eco-cars with tiny powerless engines. cj07589
  • Score: 0

10:54pm Wed 13 Aug 14

Bio8787 says...

Wonder what the traffic will be like in dorch in 4 years when they make the high street one way from Top of town down to Woods
Wonder what the traffic will be like in dorch in 4 years when they make the high street one way from Top of town down to Woods Bio8787
  • Score: 0

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