Experts to survey traffic after residents complain over air pollution

Experts to survey town's traffic after residents complain over air pollution

Experts to survey town's traffic after residents complain over air pollution

First published in News
Last updated
by , Reporter

‘ENOUGH is enough’, say residents who believe air pollution is harming their health.

People living on Boot Hill in Weymouth are seriously worried about high level of pollution on the road.

A new report shows that the levels of nitrogen dioxide recorded on Rodwell Road, particularly in the Boot Hill area, are some of the highest in the Dorset and up to double the levels of recordings taken in other parts of Weymouth.

Nitrogen dioxide is a pollutant caused by traffic which has adverse health effects on breathing and particularly affects asthma sufferers.

Residents have been campaigning about the pollution levels on the road since the new traffic light system was installed in 2011 and have been refused any compensation from the council as the changes ‘did not alter the road’. Linda Skuse and her neighbours have been in contact with Dorset County Council over the issue. She said: “We know that living on a main road, you will get traffic but the pollution caused since these traffic lights have been put in is ridiculous.

“You can’t leave washing to hang outside because it turns black. If you dust in the morning, by the afternoon there is already a thick layer of dust back again.

“There have been occasions where the stuff coming out of the lorries is so thick that you can’t even see across the road.”

Diffusion tubes on the road are checked on a monthly basis and indicate the pollution levels on the hill are higher than elsewhere in the town.

It is said that the traffic problems have also had detrimental effect on house prices on the road.

Jenny and Mick Houghton lived in Weymouth for 20 years but have now relocated to Blackpool after losing more than £40,000 on their house.

“Pollution was always high on the road but when the traffic lights were put in it doubled. I had to start using an inhaler,” said Jenny.

“We had to put in triple glazed windows in the living room because of the noise and in three weeks they were black.

“When we originally put our house on the market it was up at £197,000 and after the lights were put in it was dropped to £189,000.”

The road often sees large build-ups of traffic travelling towards Portland, with large lorries, coaches and double-decker buses, struggling to get up the hill.

The government states that the annual mean of nitrogen dioxide in the air should not exceed 40µg.m-3 and if it does, the area must be declared an Air Quality Management Area (AQMA) The most recent data from 2013 diffusion tube readings indicates that the annual mean of nitrogen dioxide on Rodwell Road was up to 48.26µg.m-3 in the worst case.

However, according to Weymouth and Portland Borough Council, once the number had been adjusted for bias, and had been averaged with the readings from an automatic monitor which is placed on the corner of Wyke Road, the levels on Boot Hill did not exceed 40µg.m-3, and they are unconcerned about the level of pollution on the road.

Resident Phil Hoskins added:“They won’t give us any compensation, but who’s going to pay for treatments when we all end up in hospital due to this?”

The residents have also asked the council for reports on noise pollution as the last was completed in 2011, before the installation of the traffic lights.

Councillor Mike Goodman, spokesman for community safety at Weymouth and Portland Borough Council, said: “The council will continue to actively monitor air quality levels in the Boot Hill-Rodwell area and respond to concerns of residents who contact us.”

Nitrogen dioxide is associated with adverse effects on human health

At high levels NO2 causes inflammation of the airways. Long term exposure may affect lung function and respiratory symptoms.

NO2 also enhances the response to allergens in sensitive individuals. High levels of NOX can have an adverse effect on vegetation, including leaf or needle damage and reduced growth.

The residents would like to see the following action taken:
- The traffic lights removed
- A safer pedestrian crossing
- Heavy vehicles diverted
- Noise monitors placed on the houses
- Carbon monitors in their homes

 

MP shows his sympathy with the people living on Boot Hill

 

SOUTH Dorset MP Richard Drax said: “I really sympathise with the people living on Boot Hill.

“They have 40-ton trucks shaking their houses and exhaust fumes pouring into their homes.

“My suggestion would be to perhaps consider removing the traffic lights.

“Most problems have a solution and I hope something can be done about this.”

Dan Brember, councillor for Rodwell at Dorset County Council, said: “As I understand the traffic management system is currently under review and changes are planned, however I don’t think they are likely to be great scale changes and the reintroduction of a roundabout isn’t going to happen.

“Early reports have indicated that the traffic flow has improved since the implementation of the new system.

“However, if the residents’ health is being negatively affected and house prices decreased as a result, that is a very serious concern and needs to be investigated.”

 

Survey of Weymouth's transport to take place

 

A SURVEY of Weymouth’s transport system is due to be carried out in the autumn.

Tens of millions of pounds were spent on transport projects in the build up to the Olympic sailing events held in Weymouth and Portland.

But not all schemes were welcomed- including replacing roundabouts with an ‘intelligent traffic light system’.

Many locals blasted the expensive overhaul and hailed the transport package a ‘waste of money’.

They criticised the replacement of roundabouts with ‘too many’ traffic lights which they say have created ‘dangerous junctions’ and increased congestion.

Roundabouts converted included those on the harbourside near Asda, and either side of the Swannery bridge.

Traffic lights replaced mini roundabouts at the top of King Street on the seafront as well as on Boot Hill – which also resulted in a shake-up of some road systems.

One of the aims of the £9.3m project was to improve traffic flow around the town and reduce the need for motorists to use King Street and the Esplanade which often gets congested.

Independent experts will now carry out a stage four road safety audit.

The auditors will take into account all road users, not just motorists.

They will look at key areas of the scheme to ensure it meets national standards.

This is the final stage of evaluation of the scheme.

Previous inspections looked at the design and construction of the project.

This time the auditors will take into account accident records to look at any trends.

After identifying potential road safety problems they will make recommendations on possible solutions.

The county council will take this advice along with the diverse and widespread views of local residents to improve areas such as: Boot Hill/Harbour Crossroads; the Wyke Road/Rodwell Road junction and The Jubilee Clock junction on the Esplanade.

Cllr Mike Byatt, county council member for Weymouth, said: “The county council have been mindful of the needs of the town’s residents and visitors. This review will help ensure that our transport plan is fit for purpose and is integrated into Weymouth town centre’s ‘master’ plan.”

 

 

Comments (26)

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7:35am Thu 14 Aug 14

Nick0070 says...

Whats needed is a roundabout
Whats needed is a roundabout Nick0070
  • Score: 10

7:50am Thu 14 Aug 14

bargain price says...

if only there was a spot on the road where vehicles could give to the right and go around, that would make the traffic flow better...
if only there was a spot on the road where vehicles could give to the right and go around, that would make the traffic flow better... bargain price
  • Score: 5

7:58am Thu 14 Aug 14

The Fish says...

People forget too easily the traffic jams caused when the roundabout was there, especially when trying to get out from Newstead Road (ASDA). Further what where the Nitrogen Dioxide levels when the roundabout was there, without this information the figures are meaningless.
People forget too easily the traffic jams caused when the roundabout was there, especially when trying to get out from Newstead Road (ASDA). Further what where the Nitrogen Dioxide levels when the roundabout was there, without this information the figures are meaningless. The Fish
  • Score: 11

8:11am Thu 14 Aug 14

Joe_Bloggs says...

Typical a traffic survey in the autumn. How about doing the survey during the summer when the traffic problems are at their worst
Typical a traffic survey in the autumn. How about doing the survey during the summer when the traffic problems are at their worst Joe_Bloggs
  • Score: 20

9:14am Thu 14 Aug 14

hobbitdamian says...

Of course the pollution levels are going to be higher in the hill. The lorry and car engines are working harder to get up the hill. There saved the council some money. I will only charge the council 10k for that observation. And another 10k for the solution.a tunnel!!!
Of course the pollution levels are going to be higher in the hill. The lorry and car engines are working harder to get up the hill. There saved the council some money. I will only charge the council 10k for that observation. And another 10k for the solution.a tunnel!!! hobbitdamian
  • Score: -7

9:26am Thu 14 Aug 14

JamesR543121 says...

hobbitdamian wrote:
Of course the pollution levels are going to be higher in the hill. The lorry and car engines are working harder to get up the hill. There saved the council some money. I will only charge the council 10k for that observation. And another 10k for the solution.a tunnel!!!
Dear Dorset Echo, please would you ask the Council scientists to clarify what they mean by 'adjusting the number for bias' and furthermore why the reading from the Rodwell Road diffusion tube needs to be 'averaged' with the meter from Wyke Road?

If an independent diffusion tube does indeed provide an annual mean of 48.26µg.m-3 then that is the pollution level at that location (no matter the measurement from further down the street), and is rightly cause for concern. Anything else is manipulating the data.
[quote][p][bold]hobbitdamian[/bold] wrote: Of course the pollution levels are going to be higher in the hill. The lorry and car engines are working harder to get up the hill. There saved the council some money. I will only charge the council 10k for that observation. And another 10k for the solution.a tunnel!!![/p][/quote]Dear Dorset Echo, please would you ask the Council scientists to clarify what they mean by 'adjusting the number for bias' and furthermore why the reading from the Rodwell Road diffusion tube needs to be 'averaged' with the meter from Wyke Road? If an independent diffusion tube does indeed provide an annual mean of 48.26µg.m-3 then that is the pollution level at that location (no matter the measurement from further down the street), and is rightly cause for concern. Anything else is manipulating the data. JamesR543121
  • Score: 19

10:18am Thu 14 Aug 14

voiceof says...

One solution: Build the Western relief road. The constant clamour to return to a roundabout is nonsense, Westway Rd was always backed up all the way to the Swannery bridge, and getting into and out of Asda was chaos. The pollution is caused when large diesels are accelerating up Boot Hill so wouldn't make a difference. Maybe force the bus companies to use low pollution buses as in London?
One solution: Build the Western relief road. The constant clamour to return to a roundabout is nonsense, Westway Rd was always backed up all the way to the Swannery bridge, and getting into and out of Asda was chaos. The pollution is caused when large diesels are accelerating up Boot Hill so wouldn't make a difference. Maybe force the bus companies to use low pollution buses as in London? voiceof
  • Score: 9

10:55am Thu 14 Aug 14

Wilbraham says...

It is obvious that traffic travelling to Portland up Boot hill cause the pollution due to the lights at the top holding up traffic when the road ahead is empty. Also the amount of traffic going through Weymouth has been reduced as most locals now use the Lanehouse route which is not fit for the amount of traffic at Wyke Church. Please take out the lights at the top of Boot Hill and improve the Lanehouse route.
It is obvious that traffic travelling to Portland up Boot hill cause the pollution due to the lights at the top holding up traffic when the road ahead is empty. Also the amount of traffic going through Weymouth has been reduced as most locals now use the Lanehouse route which is not fit for the amount of traffic at Wyke Church. Please take out the lights at the top of Boot Hill and improve the Lanehouse route. Wilbraham
  • Score: 8

11:17am Thu 14 Aug 14

The Fish says...

Wilbraham wrote:
It is obvious that traffic travelling to Portland up Boot hill cause the pollution due to the lights at the top holding up traffic when the road ahead is empty. Also the amount of traffic going through Weymouth has been reduced as most locals now use the Lanehouse route which is not fit for the amount of traffic at Wyke Church. Please take out the lights at the top of Boot Hill and improve the Lanehouse route.
Remove the automatic lights but leave the pedestrian crossing (with lights), this will allow most of the traffic to continue straight on unhindered, those turning right will have to wait for a gap in those cars coming down Boot hill.
[quote][p][bold]Wilbraham[/bold] wrote: It is obvious that traffic travelling to Portland up Boot hill cause the pollution due to the lights at the top holding up traffic when the road ahead is empty. Also the amount of traffic going through Weymouth has been reduced as most locals now use the Lanehouse route which is not fit for the amount of traffic at Wyke Church. Please take out the lights at the top of Boot Hill and improve the Lanehouse route.[/p][/quote]Remove the automatic lights but leave the pedestrian crossing (with lights), this will allow most of the traffic to continue straight on unhindered, those turning right will have to wait for a gap in those cars coming down Boot hill. The Fish
  • Score: 3

12:26pm Thu 14 Aug 14

MrTomSmith says...

9.3 Million on this traffic scheme, and now WE have to pay for experts to come in and tell them that the system is just not working. Reduce traffic flo is the answer, let them go up the hill on Odds days and down the Hill on even days. Sorted, Move on.
9.3 Million on this traffic scheme, and now WE have to pay for experts to come in and tell them that the system is just not working. Reduce traffic flo is the answer, let them go up the hill on Odds days and down the Hill on even days. Sorted, Move on. MrTomSmith
  • Score: -5

12:34pm Thu 14 Aug 14

shy talk says...

Most HGV’s prefer to use the Weymouth, Boot Hill, Buxton Road route. This route being safer and better access then the Lane House route. All Saints Church, Wyke Regis if holding a wedding or funeral or any other function. The Portland Road becomes a choke point due to cars being parked along this narrow road outside the church; this reduces the road to single lane. With the resulting tailbacks in both directions.

Solution double yellow lines both sides of the road outside the church. Not very popular idea with the parishioner. To reduce the amount of traffic and pollution from traffic coming into Weymouth and Wyke Regis it seems, dare I say the proposed Western Route is built?
Most HGV’s prefer to use the Weymouth, Boot Hill, Buxton Road route. This route being safer and better access then the Lane House route. All Saints Church, Wyke Regis if holding a wedding or funeral or any other function. The Portland Road becomes a choke point due to cars being parked along this narrow road outside the church; this reduces the road to single lane. With the resulting tailbacks in both directions. Solution double yellow lines both sides of the road outside the church. Not very popular idea with the parishioner. To reduce the amount of traffic and pollution from traffic coming into Weymouth and Wyke Regis it seems, dare I say the proposed Western Route is built? shy talk
  • Score: 5

12:34pm Thu 14 Aug 14

MadMicke12 says...

More taxpayers money wasted on "EXPERTS"

Why do they need experts now. Surely there were experts involved in the commissioning of these transport measures and they would have advised Ackerman and Piles at that time what the pollution levels would be like.

As for doing these tests in the Autumn - well that is the dumbest idea I have ever heard in my entire life. Any testing should be done when the road is at it's busiest, which, by default, based on our main type of business, tourism, is going to be the best time to do any survey on pollution and noise levels.

By default, the air and noise pollution on Boot Hill is going to be major because of heavy vehicles and buses having to use much more engine power to get up that hill - more engine revs at low gear on vehicles using diesel is going to cause both air and noise pollution - common sense - whereas, vehicles coming down the hill will use less power on the engine with the associated lower rev output, thereby lowering both noise and air pollution. Diesel fuel is cheaper than car fuel, but the pollution output, both in fumes and dirt particles is far greater because it is not a clean burning fuel unlike petrol - yes, petrol also puts out fumes and dirt, but nowhere near what a diesel engine puts out.

As for sorting this out, well, that is another matter entirely. As there is only one way on or off Portland, there will always be pollution problems, whether you put the traffic through Wyke and Lanehouse or up Boot Hill. One thing that might help is if these so-called intelligent traffic lights were actually intelligent. But as has been proven, with vehicles being stuck at the lights at the top of Boot Hill, these lights are nowhere near intelligent - stuck at the lights waiting for them to stop other, non existent vehicles coming off of Portland. It strikes me that loads of money was wasted putting in these intelligent lights all over Weymouth and Portland, only for the intelligent part of them to be turned off after the Olympics had finished.

This is not only at these lights though. Check out all the lights that have been installed as part of the Olympics transport package and you will see the same problems, both on normal traffic signals and at pedestrian crossing lights. The pedestrian lights at the top of King Street by the Esso garage are a joke - you press the button and wait to cross. No traffic approaches but the little red man stays red and the big green 'proceed' light for the vehicles stays green even though there is no traffic anywhere near the lights, and don't get me started about vehicles stopping on the crossing otherwise you will see steam coming from my ears. Anyway, you come off the Swannery Bridge junction, go up King Street towards the Jubilee Clock only top be met by even more traffic lights that are non-intelligent. One ta the junction of King Street and Queen Street and then another set the top on the junction of King Street and the Esplanade. Those two sets of lights are so out of sync that traffic block the exit from Queen Street and the pedestrians crossing King Street. The council put a yellow hatched box at the Queen Street junction, but every driver I see chooses to ignore it so that when the lights go green to allow the traffic to come out of Queen Street, nothing can move because some idiot has stopped on the yellow box. What annoys me even more though is the fact that the police let it happen. Just the other day, there were vehicles blocking the yellow box, and Mr Plod just carried on as if nothing was amiss.

The only thing that annoys me more than Plod not doing his job is these parents who decide to cross the road with their children directly at the junction of King Street and the Esplanade where you have traffic coming at you from 3 ways - by all means parents, risk your own lives if you want, but don't risk the lives of your children - I mean - pushing a buggy across the road in between cars or vans on a two way street is inviting disaster, especially when there are light controlled crossing points 50 metres away and an underpass that is both wheelchair and buggy friendly. Then, these same parents have a go at me when I pull them about it. they would be screaming blue murder if their child was killed by their own stupidity.

As for the pollution matter, well that is not an easy one to sort out - it matters not whether there are lights or not at the top of Boot Hill, you are still going to get the pollution because the heavy diesel traffic still has to go up that hill in low gear with high revs spewing out fumes, noise and dirt. The only way to reduce that is to build a tunnel, as someone suggested earlier, but as both W&P council and DCC have no money to spare, the only way that that would be done is with a government grant, and Mr Cameron will tell you, that ain't going to happen with this government. There is, however, a superb business opportunity here if someone has the money and the guts to do it. If Condor do move out, someone could come in with 2 or 3 big lorry carrying vehicles and run a ferry service for lorries and the like from Weymouth Ferry Port to Portland Port. Any thoughts on that idea anyone????
More taxpayers money wasted on "EXPERTS" Why do they need experts now. Surely there were experts involved in the commissioning of these transport measures and they would have advised Ackerman and Piles at that time what the pollution levels would be like. As for doing these tests in the Autumn - well that is the dumbest idea I have ever heard in my entire life. Any testing should be done when the road is at it's busiest, which, by default, based on our main type of business, tourism, is going to be the best time to do any survey on pollution and noise levels. By default, the air and noise pollution on Boot Hill is going to be major because of heavy vehicles and buses having to use much more engine power to get up that hill - more engine revs at low gear on vehicles using diesel is going to cause both air and noise pollution - common sense - whereas, vehicles coming down the hill will use less power on the engine with the associated lower rev output, thereby lowering both noise and air pollution. Diesel fuel is cheaper than car fuel, but the pollution output, both in fumes and dirt particles is far greater because it is not a clean burning fuel unlike petrol - yes, petrol also puts out fumes and dirt, but nowhere near what a diesel engine puts out. As for sorting this out, well, that is another matter entirely. As there is only one way on or off Portland, there will always be pollution problems, whether you put the traffic through Wyke and Lanehouse or up Boot Hill. One thing that might help is if these so-called intelligent traffic lights were actually intelligent. But as has been proven, with vehicles being stuck at the lights at the top of Boot Hill, these lights are nowhere near intelligent - stuck at the lights waiting for them to stop other, non existent vehicles coming off of Portland. It strikes me that loads of money was wasted putting in these intelligent lights all over Weymouth and Portland, only for the intelligent part of them to be turned off after the Olympics had finished. This is not only at these lights though. Check out all the lights that have been installed as part of the Olympics transport package and you will see the same problems, both on normal traffic signals and at pedestrian crossing lights. The pedestrian lights at the top of King Street by the Esso garage are a joke - you press the button and wait to cross. No traffic approaches but the little red man stays red and the big green 'proceed' light for the vehicles stays green even though there is no traffic anywhere near the lights, and don't get me started about vehicles stopping on the crossing otherwise you will see steam coming from my ears. Anyway, you come off the Swannery Bridge junction, go up King Street towards the Jubilee Clock only top be met by even more traffic lights that are non-intelligent. One ta the junction of King Street and Queen Street and then another set the top on the junction of King Street and the Esplanade. Those two sets of lights are so out of sync that traffic block the exit from Queen Street and the pedestrians crossing King Street. The council put a yellow hatched box at the Queen Street junction, but every driver I see chooses to ignore it so that when the lights go green to allow the traffic to come out of Queen Street, nothing can move because some idiot has stopped on the yellow box. What annoys me even more though is the fact that the police let it happen. Just the other day, there were vehicles blocking the yellow box, and Mr Plod just carried on as if nothing was amiss. The only thing that annoys me more than Plod not doing his job is these parents who decide to cross the road with their children directly at the junction of King Street and the Esplanade where you have traffic coming at you from 3 ways - by all means parents, risk your own lives if you want, but don't risk the lives of your children - I mean - pushing a buggy across the road in between cars or vans on a two way street is inviting disaster, especially when there are light controlled crossing points 50 metres away and an underpass that is both wheelchair and buggy friendly. Then, these same parents have a go at me when I pull them about it. they would be screaming blue murder if their child was killed by their own stupidity. As for the pollution matter, well that is not an easy one to sort out - it matters not whether there are lights or not at the top of Boot Hill, you are still going to get the pollution because the heavy diesel traffic still has to go up that hill in low gear with high revs spewing out fumes, noise and dirt. The only way to reduce that is to build a tunnel, as someone suggested earlier, but as both W&P council and DCC have no money to spare, the only way that that would be done is with a government grant, and Mr Cameron will tell you, that ain't going to happen with this government. There is, however, a superb business opportunity here if someone has the money and the guts to do it. If Condor do move out, someone could come in with 2 or 3 big lorry carrying vehicles and run a ferry service for lorries and the like from Weymouth Ferry Port to Portland Port. Any thoughts on that idea anyone???? MadMicke12
  • Score: -1

12:53pm Thu 14 Aug 14

Morgasm says...

Looking at past air quality reports Boot Hill has always had high (if not the highest) air pollution levels in Dorset. This is just simply a combination of a hill and queuing traffic. Queuing either from traffic lights/ roundabouts/ crossings or just waiting to turn turn left it makes no difference. From what I remember local residents have had an issue with this for years. The only real solution is to remove the traffic all together. Just to note the annual mean levels in Boot Hill in 2005 were 44.9(µg/m3), in 2013 they were 29.61(µg/m3). So if anything its got better.
Looking at past air quality reports Boot Hill has always had high (if not the highest) air pollution levels in Dorset. This is just simply a combination of a hill and queuing traffic. Queuing either from traffic lights/ roundabouts/ crossings or just waiting to turn turn left it makes no difference. From what I remember local residents have had an issue with this for years. The only real solution is to remove the traffic all together. Just to note the annual mean levels in Boot Hill in 2005 were 44.9(µg/m3), in 2013 they were 29.61(µg/m3). So if anything its got better. Morgasm
  • Score: 2

1:17pm Thu 14 Aug 14

MrTomSmith says...

Madmickle12 I agree with everything you say good post, up to the Ferry bit. I wouldn't be in favour purely because if we do get rid of Condor Ferry traffic, I see it is a good time to get rid of a lot more traffic at the same time. Also Can't see how it would save time, as you would have to queue up to get on, board, and then cross, and unload. Long process. If it doesn't save time no-one will use it. Who is going to pay for a trip that takes a lot longer? No sorry non starter this one.

One thing that has got worse this year is the traffic coming from the Pavilion to the Clock junction That is queued up every evening now, and I presume the reason is more cars are parked at the Pavilion as it is cheaper. But as we all know come September 8th or whatever the date is, this particular problem will actually suddenly disappear.

The thing is, we moan when there are not enough people, and then we moan when the roads are busy, you just simply cannot have it both ways.

But improvements can be done yes, Boot Hill is complete wreck, how it can be this bad I just don't know. A 10 year old could do better, it is a complete disaster and the council SURELY can do something about it without spending on experts!! Its crazy. Sack the lot of them, I keep saying that, we have amateurs doing a job we need to be done by professionals. We have far too many, that have NO IDEA, at all. They don't, they really don't. They are hopeless.
Madmickle12 I agree with everything you say good post, up to the Ferry bit. I wouldn't be in favour purely because if we do get rid of Condor Ferry traffic, I see it is a good time to get rid of a lot more traffic at the same time. Also Can't see how it would save time, as you would have to queue up to get on, board, and then cross, and unload. Long process. If it doesn't save time no-one will use it. Who is going to pay for a trip that takes a lot longer? No sorry non starter this one. One thing that has got worse this year is the traffic coming from the Pavilion to the Clock junction That is queued up every evening now, and I presume the reason is more cars are parked at the Pavilion as it is cheaper. But as we all know come September 8th or whatever the date is, this particular problem will actually suddenly disappear. The thing is, we moan when there are not enough people, and then we moan when the roads are busy, you just simply cannot have it both ways. But improvements can be done yes, Boot Hill is complete wreck, how it can be this bad I just don't know. A 10 year old could do better, it is a complete disaster and the council SURELY can do something about it without spending on experts!! Its crazy. Sack the lot of them, I keep saying that, we have amateurs doing a job we need to be done by professionals. We have far too many, that have NO IDEA, at all. They don't, they really don't. They are hopeless. MrTomSmith
  • Score: -1

1:35pm Thu 14 Aug 14

JamesYoung says...

voiceof wrote:
One solution: Build the Western relief road. The constant clamour to return to a roundabout is nonsense, Westway Rd was always backed up all the way to the Swannery bridge, and getting into and out of Asda was chaos. The pollution is caused when large diesels are accelerating up Boot Hill so wouldn't make a difference. Maybe force the bus companies to use low pollution buses as in London?
Yes. This is, really, the only solution.
[quote][p][bold]voiceof[/bold] wrote: One solution: Build the Western relief road. The constant clamour to return to a roundabout is nonsense, Westway Rd was always backed up all the way to the Swannery bridge, and getting into and out of Asda was chaos. The pollution is caused when large diesels are accelerating up Boot Hill so wouldn't make a difference. Maybe force the bus companies to use low pollution buses as in London?[/p][/quote]Yes. This is, really, the only solution. JamesYoung
  • Score: 7

1:45pm Thu 14 Aug 14

custos says...

"However, according to Weymouth and Portland Borough Council, once the number had been adjusted for bias, and had been averaged with the readings from an automatic monitor which is placed on the corner of Wyke Road, the levels on Boot Hill did not exceed 40µg.m-3, and they are unconcerned about the level of pollution on the road."

That's OK then - WPBC are "unconcerned" !
"However, according to Weymouth and Portland Borough Council, once the number had been adjusted for bias, and had been averaged with the readings from an automatic monitor which is placed on the corner of Wyke Road, the levels on Boot Hill did not exceed 40µg.m-3, and they are unconcerned about the level of pollution on the road." That's OK then - WPBC are "unconcerned" ! custos
  • Score: 3

3:07pm Thu 14 Aug 14

Rod Well says...

The house price quote doesn't make sense. How does a drop in asking price from £197,000 to £189,000 equate to a loss of £40,000?
The house price quote doesn't make sense. How does a drop in asking price from £197,000 to £189,000 equate to a loss of £40,000? Rod Well
  • Score: 1

3:36pm Thu 14 Aug 14

trymybest says...

Turn all the traffic lights off, paint a white circle in the middle off each junction on boot hill call them a roundabout, for a week or month a see what happens if no improvement turn the light back on and burn off the white circle, if there is an improvement keep them off and remark the road, the lights can stay there. The money that is saved having the lights off would pay for the road markings and circles more than once.
Turn all the traffic lights off, paint a white circle in the middle off each junction on boot hill call them a roundabout, for a week or month a see what happens if no improvement turn the light back on and burn off the white circle, if there is an improvement keep them off and remark the road, the lights can stay there. The money that is saved having the lights off would pay for the road markings and circles more than once. trymybest
  • Score: 5

5:24pm Thu 14 Aug 14

annotater says...

When traffic lights fail due to electrical supply issues, drivers once again become courteous and there is never an issue let alone an accident. Come on, switch the lights off, put white blobs in the middle of the road to mark the centre of the junction and see what happens.
We will be impressed at the lack of problems.
When traffic lights fail due to electrical supply issues, drivers once again become courteous and there is never an issue let alone an accident. Come on, switch the lights off, put white blobs in the middle of the road to mark the centre of the junction and see what happens. We will be impressed at the lack of problems. annotater
  • Score: 2

5:33pm Thu 14 Aug 14

Get a grip says...

Rod Well wrote:
The house price quote doesn't make sense. How does a drop in asking price from £197,000 to £189,000 equate to a loss of £40,000?
I thought much the same
[quote][p][bold]Rod Well[/bold] wrote: The house price quote doesn't make sense. How does a drop in asking price from £197,000 to £189,000 equate to a loss of £40,000?[/p][/quote]I thought much the same Get a grip
  • Score: 1

6:04pm Thu 14 Aug 14

monkeydog says...

This will never change until there's a new road to Portland. Rodwell Road wasn't built for the traffic it carries and the people of the Boot Hill area will continue to suffer until something is done.
This will never change until there's a new road to Portland. Rodwell Road wasn't built for the traffic it carries and the people of the Boot Hill area will continue to suffer until something is done. monkeydog
  • Score: 0

6:06pm Thu 14 Aug 14

satisfecho says...

I hope the residents of Boot Hill don't own cars which add to the problems!
I hope the residents of Boot Hill don't own cars which add to the problems! satisfecho
  • Score: -2

10:40pm Thu 14 Aug 14

JACKC says...

..and just think - all those cars that go via Lanehouse to avoid the queues will soon have to join more queues when they build all those 'affordable' houses on the town green!!!
..and just think - all those cars that go via Lanehouse to avoid the queues will soon have to join more queues when they build all those 'affordable' houses on the town green!!! JACKC
  • Score: 1

7:33am Fri 15 Aug 14

average_kinda_guy says...

voiceof wrote:
One solution: Build the Western relief road. The constant clamour to return to a roundabout is nonsense, Westway Rd was always backed up all the way to the Swannery bridge, and getting into and out of Asda was chaos. The pollution is caused when large diesels are accelerating up Boot Hill so wouldn't make a difference. Maybe force the bus companies to use low pollution buses as in London?
I agree with the idea of the western relief road. However I also think that a significant part of the hold up on Westwey road was caused by traffic using Goldcroft Road and Newstead Road as a bypass bypass in order to gain priority over the main traffic flow at Asda Roundabout. If this rat run had ever been addressed the whole scenario we have there now MAY have been different.
[quote][p][bold]voiceof[/bold] wrote: One solution: Build the Western relief road. The constant clamour to return to a roundabout is nonsense, Westway Rd was always backed up all the way to the Swannery bridge, and getting into and out of Asda was chaos. The pollution is caused when large diesels are accelerating up Boot Hill so wouldn't make a difference. Maybe force the bus companies to use low pollution buses as in London?[/p][/quote]I agree with the idea of the western relief road. However I also think that a significant part of the hold up on Westwey road was caused by traffic using Goldcroft Road and Newstead Road as a bypass bypass in order to gain priority over the main traffic flow at Asda Roundabout. If this rat run had ever been addressed the whole scenario we have there now MAY have been different. average_kinda_guy
  • Score: -1

3:46pm Fri 15 Aug 14

portlandboy says...

Why was an automatic sensor placed at the corner of Wyke Road?
Traffic doesn't stop idle ON the junction, it stops on the hill either side of the junction, so it should've been placed in the middle of the idling traffic in order to record the levels there.
Why was an automatic sensor placed at the corner of Wyke Road? Traffic doesn't stop idle ON the junction, it stops on the hill either side of the junction, so it should've been placed in the middle of the idling traffic in order to record the levels there. portlandboy
  • Score: 1

4:03pm Fri 15 Aug 14

caapprentice says...

portlandboy says...Why was an automatic sensor placed at the corner of Wyke Road?
The answer to that is far, far beyond the comprehension of us poor 'non-experts' and we shouldn't being worrying our little heads about such things.
Perhaps it is because unbeknown to us plebs, the pollutant rolls downhill from both Wyke and Rodwell roads and the experts were able to save putting two sensors there, the noxious gases being heavier than pure air (:o))
portlandboy says...Why was an automatic sensor placed at the corner of Wyke Road? The answer to that is far, far beyond the comprehension of us poor 'non-experts' and we shouldn't being worrying our little heads about such things. Perhaps it is because unbeknown to us plebs, the pollutant rolls downhill from both Wyke and Rodwell roads and the experts were able to save putting two sensors there, the noxious gases being heavier than pure air (:o)) caapprentice
  • Score: 0

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