UPDATE: Motorcyclist seriously injured in A353 crash

The crash scene on the A353 at Poxwell. Picture: GRAHAM HUNT

The crash scene on the A353 at Poxwell. Picture: GRAHAM HUNT

First published in News
Last updated

A MOTORCYCLIST was seriously injured in crash which caused traffic chaos.

It happened on the A353 at Poxwell at around 5.40pm yesterday.

The incident, which involved a motorcycle and a car, led to the closure of the A353 east of Weymouth at rush-hour and there was heavy traffic on roads between Weymouth and Dor-chester as motorists tried to find alternative routes.

Police said the motorcyclist, a man in his 20s, suffered a broken leg and hip injuries.

The accident is believed to have taken place on a bend in the centre of Poxwell.

Police and an ambulance were at the scene.

The Dorset and Somerset Air Ambulance was also scrambled and landed in a field nearby.

But after paramedics assessed the rider’s injuries it was decided an airlift was not needed and the man was taken to Dorset County Hospital by land ambulance.

The road was closed between Osmington and the A352 junction at Warmwell roundabout for a few hours while recovery was arranged and investigators examined the scene. A Poxwell resident said: “We initially thought it was a fatal accident because the road was closed for a few hours.

“I saw the air ambulance land ing in a field so I thought the injuries must be of a serious nature. There was traffic queuing up in the village and then they closed the road near the Ringstead turning so no more could get through.”

She added: “We’ve been here five years and there’s been a few accidents on the roads near Poxwell but I can’t remember one in the village itself.”

A spokesman for Dorset Police said: “At approximately 5.40pm a two vehicle serious injury road traffic collision occurred on the A353 at Poxwell between a car and a motorcycle.

“If the incident or the riding of a black motorcycle bearing L plates was witnessed, the public are asked to contact PC 1823 Stroud on 101 quoting incident number 18:343.”

Comments (7)

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9:09pm Mon 18 Aug 14

Dorset69 says...

Oh im sure the motorcyclist is very sorry for causing traffic chaos. I hope you reporters are never in an accident and cause a delay !!!
Oh im sure the motorcyclist is very sorry for causing traffic chaos. I hope you reporters are never in an accident and cause a delay !!! Dorset69
  • Score: -14

10:43pm Mon 18 Aug 14

whatever66 says...

What about the driving of the car driver????
What about the driving of the car driver???? whatever66
  • Score: 2

11:42am Tue 19 Aug 14

Hippyhooker says...

whatever66 wrote:
What about the driving of the car driver????
They obviously have reason to ask regarding the motorcycle from information already obtained !
[quote][p][bold]whatever66[/bold] wrote: What about the driving of the car driver????[/p][/quote]They obviously have reason to ask regarding the motorcycle from information already obtained ! Hippyhooker
  • Score: 3

12:18pm Tue 19 Aug 14

JackJohnson says...

Hippyhooker wrote:
whatever66 wrote:
What about the driving of the car driver????
They obviously have reason to ask regarding the motorcycle from information already obtained !
Whatever happened, they have reason to ask - regardless of what the car driver has told them. He's hardly an independent witness.
[quote][p][bold]Hippyhooker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]whatever66[/bold] wrote: What about the driving of the car driver????[/p][/quote]They obviously have reason to ask regarding the motorcycle from information already obtained ![/p][/quote]Whatever happened, they have reason to ask - regardless of what the car driver has told them. He's hardly an independent witness. JackJohnson
  • Score: 4

7:51pm Tue 19 Aug 14

Harpya Orkinus says...

Learner bikers are IMMORTAL - didn't you know that ?? At least, many of them seem to think so, judging from the way they ride !! Walk along somewhere like Chickerell Road, Preston Beach Road or Portland Beach Road, and you may hear a bike being furiously ridden coming up from behind you. As it passes, you can't help but grin as you see the little white square with the red 'L' that tells you you were correct in your assumption. I learned to ride on Lambrettas, and passed my test in 1963 on a TV175 series II (?) - also known as the 'Widestyle', with large, fixed front fender. From those early days, I now ride a Kawasaki Vulcan 800 Classic (think 1950s Harley 'Fat Boy'), which I bought new in Jan '99, and so far haven't had a single mishap. The trick is, don't try to run before you can walk, consider all other road users idiots, whether on bike or in car, and drive/ride in a manner relative to common-sense and how much of the road ahead you can see. Riding or driving slower on unfamiliar routes is also a good idea, and the same goes for wet weather. Keep these points in mind, and you'll cheat the Grim Reaper yet. You MAY even get to be forty....
Learner bikers are IMMORTAL - didn't you know that ?? At least, many of them seem to think so, judging from the way they ride !! Walk along somewhere like Chickerell Road, Preston Beach Road or Portland Beach Road, and you may hear a bike being furiously ridden coming up from behind you. As it passes, you can't help but grin as you see the little white square with the red 'L' that tells you you were correct in your assumption. I learned to ride on Lambrettas, and passed my test in 1963 on a TV175 series II (?) - also known as the 'Widestyle', with large, fixed front fender. From those early days, I now ride a Kawasaki Vulcan 800 Classic (think 1950s Harley 'Fat Boy'), which I bought new in Jan '99, and so far haven't had a single mishap. The trick is, don't try to run before you can walk, consider all other road users idiots, whether on bike or in car, and drive/ride in a manner relative to common-sense and how much of the road ahead you can see. Riding or driving slower on unfamiliar routes is also a good idea, and the same goes for wet weather. Keep these points in mind, and you'll cheat the Grim Reaper yet. You MAY even get to be forty.... Harpya Orkinus
  • Score: 4

2:34pm Wed 20 Aug 14

MadMicke12 says...

Year on year, there are increases in the number of accidents on the roads of Dorset, and this year looks like being a bumper year for this species of accident - I use the word 'accident' loosely as I am a firm believer that most 'accidents' are avoidable and only occur because of people not using common sense.

How many more are going to be injured or killed on our roads before legislators begin to take notice and reduce speeds on our country roads. They put 60 MPH speed limits on some roads that are clearly designed to be low speed, 40 MPH roads. It is better to leave earlier and drive/ride slower than leave at the last possible minute and then have to rush risking life and limb in the process.

Hope the chap gets well soon, but my biggest wish, which I know will never come true is hat no more people are injured or killed on our roads.
Year on year, there are increases in the number of accidents on the roads of Dorset, and this year looks like being a bumper year for this species of accident - I use the word 'accident' loosely as I am a firm believer that most 'accidents' are avoidable and only occur because of people not using common sense. How many more are going to be injured or killed on our roads before legislators begin to take notice and reduce speeds on our country roads. They put 60 MPH speed limits on some roads that are clearly designed to be low speed, 40 MPH roads. It is better to leave earlier and drive/ride slower than leave at the last possible minute and then have to rush risking life and limb in the process. Hope the chap gets well soon, but my biggest wish, which I know will never come true is hat no more people are injured or killed on our roads. MadMicke12
  • Score: 0

3:05pm Wed 20 Aug 14

JackJohnson says...

Harpya Orkinus wrote:
Learner bikers are IMMORTAL - didn't you know that ?? At least, many of them seem to think so, judging from the way they ride !! Walk along somewhere like Chickerell Road, Preston Beach Road or Portland Beach Road, and you may hear a bike being furiously ridden coming up from behind you. As it passes, you can't help but grin as you see the little white square with the red 'L' that tells you you were correct in your assumption. I learned to ride on Lambrettas, and passed my test in 1963 on a TV175 series II (?) - also known as the 'Widestyle', with large, fixed front fender. From those early days, I now ride a Kawasaki Vulcan 800 Classic (think 1950s Harley 'Fat Boy'), which I bought new in Jan '99, and so far haven't had a single mishap. The trick is, don't try to run before you can walk, consider all other road users idiots, whether on bike or in car, and drive/ride in a manner relative to common-sense and how much of the road ahead you can see. Riding or driving slower on unfamiliar routes is also a good idea, and the same goes for wet weather. Keep these points in mind, and you'll cheat the Grim Reaper yet. You MAY even get to be forty....
That's true - most learners are young and haven't, yet, grown out of the indestructible phase. They still have a few mistakes to make to knock some sense into them. I don't think it really matters if they're on a bike or in a car. It's just more noticeable on a bike than it is in a car as bikes are inherently more dangerous - and the consequences of a mistake are often a lot more serious. It's easy to find yourself in trouble due to your own actions or the actions of another road user, but can be a lot more difficult to get out of trouble on a small, underpowered bike than it is on a bigger machine.

It's also been observed that some drivers take more risks around small bikes. I rode a 200cc 4-stoke into London every day for a number of years in the 80s - 100 miles a day; A5, M1, North Circular, so I write from experience. I don't expect anything has improved. More recently I watched a young work colleague pass his driving test, buy his first car, then - despite being an otherwise sensible lad - act like an idiot in his Nissan Micra. No wonder insurance for the young is so high...

As usual no idea who, or what, caused this incident. I'll reserve judgement on that. Just glad they both lived, and have an opportunity to learn from whatever went wrong.

To add to your tips, I'd add - if you ride a motorcycle, always keep in mind that sooner or later you probably WILL either fall off, or get knocked off. Dress accordingly - good, strong boots; quality helmet; gloves; and leathers (or similar). I tend to prefer leathers as I've never met a cow with gravel rash - except my ex., but that's another story.
[quote][p][bold]Harpya Orkinus[/bold] wrote: Learner bikers are IMMORTAL - didn't you know that ?? At least, many of them seem to think so, judging from the way they ride !! Walk along somewhere like Chickerell Road, Preston Beach Road or Portland Beach Road, and you may hear a bike being furiously ridden coming up from behind you. As it passes, you can't help but grin as you see the little white square with the red 'L' that tells you you were correct in your assumption. I learned to ride on Lambrettas, and passed my test in 1963 on a TV175 series II (?) - also known as the 'Widestyle', with large, fixed front fender. From those early days, I now ride a Kawasaki Vulcan 800 Classic (think 1950s Harley 'Fat Boy'), which I bought new in Jan '99, and so far haven't had a single mishap. The trick is, don't try to run before you can walk, consider all other road users idiots, whether on bike or in car, and drive/ride in a manner relative to common-sense and how much of the road ahead you can see. Riding or driving slower on unfamiliar routes is also a good idea, and the same goes for wet weather. Keep these points in mind, and you'll cheat the Grim Reaper yet. You MAY even get to be forty....[/p][/quote]That's true - most learners are young and haven't, yet, grown out of the indestructible phase. They still have a few mistakes to make to knock some sense into them. I don't think it really matters if they're on a bike or in a car. It's just more noticeable on a bike than it is in a car as bikes are inherently more dangerous - and the consequences of a mistake are often a lot more serious. It's easy to find yourself in trouble due to your own actions or the actions of another road user, but can be a lot more difficult to get out of trouble on a small, underpowered bike than it is on a bigger machine. It's also been observed that some drivers take more risks around small bikes. I rode a 200cc 4-stoke into London every day for a number of years in the 80s - 100 miles a day; A5, M1, North Circular, so I write from experience. I don't expect anything has improved. More recently I watched a young work colleague pass his driving test, buy his first car, then - despite being an otherwise sensible lad - act like an idiot in his Nissan Micra. No wonder insurance for the young is so high... As usual no idea who, or what, caused this incident. I'll reserve judgement on that. Just glad they both lived, and have an opportunity to learn from whatever went wrong. To add to your tips, I'd add - if you ride a motorcycle, always keep in mind that sooner or later you probably WILL either fall off, or get knocked off. Dress accordingly - good, strong boots; quality helmet; gloves; and leathers (or similar). I tend to prefer leathers as I've never met a cow with gravel rash - except my ex., but that's another story. JackJohnson
  • Score: 0

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