New protests over Charminster wind farm bid

PROTEST: Wind farm protest at Charlton Down. From left, Gawain Towler, Keith Hansford and Geoff Markham

PROTEST: Wind farm protest at Charlton Down. From left, Gawain Towler, Keith Hansford and Geoff Markham

First published in News Dorset Echo: Photograph of the Author by , Senior Reporter

STRONG feelings were aired as a public consultation into a controversial wind farm near Dorchester began.

Renewable energy firm Broadview Energy Limited is in the early stages of submitting a proposal for a seven-turbine development on agricultural land between Wolfedale Golf Course and Slyer’s Lane in Charminster.

Developers say the wind farm will generate enough energy for around 7,000 homes.

Tom Cosgrove, project manager, said the pre-planning was in the ‘early stages’ and studies are still being carried out.

He said: “This event is designed for us to get more information and tell the residents everything we know.

“But we don’t know a great deal at this early stage.

“It’s very important to go through this stage and tell people what we know and get the information from them.”

He said residents’ feedback, which was given at the consultation at Charminster’s Herrison Hall yesterday, would definitely be considered in the revised plans.

But some staged a protest against the proposal.

Anti-wind farm resident Geoff Markham said: “There is just no detail.

“It’s a ‘nice’ display, there are lots of ‘nice’ pictures, but there is nothing concrete.

“They are asking for a lot of goodwill without giving us the facts.”

He said he doesn’t believe a wind farm would be a viable way to generate energy.

Gawain Towler, press officer for the UKIP party, said: “I am going to have to read a lot more before I can be categorical in my opinion.

“They say ‘we have done an environment survey into birds’.

“Well, what did you find out? Where are the results? I can’t see any details in the exhibition.”

Reacting to the comments, Mr Cosgrove said gathering more information and informing the public were the ‘whole reason’ for the consultation.

He said feeling for and against the wind farm is about 50-50 and the feedback he had received at the consultation so far had been good.

There will be another consultation in the coming months before a proposal is submitted for approval to the council next year.

How site was chosen

BROADVIEW took a map of the whole of Dorset to look for potential sites.

They then ruled out some areas – such as nature conservation areas and Sites of Special Scientific Interest.

Next they looked at wind speeds to see which of the remaining areas would have a resource that is ‘commercially viable.’

The site needed to be within ‘relative proximity’ of the local electricity network and there needed to be ‘available capacity.’

They then eliminated potential remaining areas based on transport and
access – the local roads must be capable of accommodating the delivery of abnormal loads, such as turbine components.

Next they looked at ‘residential amenity’ – the site had to have ‘sufficient separation’ from housing to minimise noise and visual impact.

The areas that were left at the end of this process were then considered to see if they were suitable options.

Three times the height of existing turbine

THE turbines will have a height of up to 125m – three times the height of the existing turbine off the A35 near Bere Regis.

Broadview says that they will be 600 metres from the nearest homes and Charminster is 1km away from the proposed site.

The site will also consist of a substation, around the size of a domestic garage, which will be jointly used by Broadview and Southern Scottish Electric.

This will be connected to the grid ‘almost certainly’ by an underground cable which will run in to the Dorchester substation.

Broadview says it will donate some of its profits to a community fund which could generate around 1.7m over the project’s 25-year life.

Comments (9)

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9:57am Wed 23 Oct 13

Sorted Echo says...

The placard should read 'Nimbys say no to wind farms'. I'm a resident of West Dorset and like a significant number of others, approve of wind farms.

It's frustrating how some people are so blind to the bigger picture. We need to be backing renewable energy for future generations because lets face it most of us reading this won't be around when the proposed batch of nuclear power stations reach the end of their operational lives so we don't have to deal with the radioactive legacy left behind. We are surrounded by sea that rises and falls every day, and as last night proved, get a decent amount of wind as well as occasional sun. If we invested in harnessing these and each cut back our energy use we'd be fine and would leave this third rock from the sun in a far better state for our offspring and theirs
The placard should read 'Nimbys say no to wind farms'. I'm a resident of West Dorset and like a significant number of others, approve of wind farms. It's frustrating how some people are so blind to the bigger picture. We need to be backing renewable energy for future generations because lets face it most of us reading this won't be around when the proposed batch of nuclear power stations reach the end of their operational lives so we don't have to deal with the radioactive legacy left behind. We are surrounded by sea that rises and falls every day, and as last night proved, get a decent amount of wind as well as occasional sun. If we invested in harnessing these and each cut back our energy use we'd be fine and would leave this third rock from the sun in a far better state for our offspring and theirs Sorted Echo
  • Score: 2

11:16am Wed 23 Oct 13

Budgie@home says...

Sorted Echo wrote:
The placard should read 'Nimbys say no to wind farms'. I'm a resident of West Dorset and like a significant number of others, approve of wind farms.

It's frustrating how some people are so blind to the bigger picture. We need to be backing renewable energy for future generations because lets face it most of us reading this won't be around when the proposed batch of nuclear power stations reach the end of their operational lives so we don't have to deal with the radioactive legacy left behind. We are surrounded by sea that rises and falls every day, and as last night proved, get a decent amount of wind as well as occasional sun. If we invested in harnessing these and each cut back our energy use we'd be fine and would leave this third rock from the sun in a far better state for our offspring and theirs
Try telling that to the industrialised emerging economies. Building these industrial turbines (not "farms") in the hope of leaving our rock a better place is just wishful thinking. People like "Sorted Echo" encourage our industry to move to such economies where they don't give a fig about emissions and simply move the problem from one part of the world to another with no effect whatsoever on the global emissions. And in so doing wreck our countryside with these monstrosities and force up bills of the poor who will have to choose between eating or heating this winter. What's more the planet hasn't warmed up at all these past 15 years so what's the point anyway?
[quote][p][bold]Sorted Echo[/bold] wrote: The placard should read 'Nimbys say no to wind farms'. I'm a resident of West Dorset and like a significant number of others, approve of wind farms. It's frustrating how some people are so blind to the bigger picture. We need to be backing renewable energy for future generations because lets face it most of us reading this won't be around when the proposed batch of nuclear power stations reach the end of their operational lives so we don't have to deal with the radioactive legacy left behind. We are surrounded by sea that rises and falls every day, and as last night proved, get a decent amount of wind as well as occasional sun. If we invested in harnessing these and each cut back our energy use we'd be fine and would leave this third rock from the sun in a far better state for our offspring and theirs[/p][/quote]Try telling that to the industrialised emerging economies. Building these industrial turbines (not "farms") in the hope of leaving our rock a better place is just wishful thinking. People like "Sorted Echo" encourage our industry to move to such economies where they don't give a fig about emissions and simply move the problem from one part of the world to another with no effect whatsoever on the global emissions. And in so doing wreck our countryside with these monstrosities and force up bills of the poor who will have to choose between eating or heating this winter. What's more the planet hasn't warmed up at all these past 15 years so what's the point anyway? Budgie@home
  • Score: 8

9:09pm Wed 23 Oct 13

beerbottle says...

well put budgie spot on.
well put budgie spot on. beerbottle
  • Score: 5

9:32pm Wed 23 Oct 13

Sorted Echo says...

Budgie, all you're doing is reinforcing your own limited and self serving mindset. I've never bought into the global warming farce and your diatribe about moving economies is absurd and demonstrates you've not read what I've written. It's obvious you're mainly motivated by what you see as 'monstrosities wrecking our countryside' which implies you're just indignant because you'll have to look at them if built.
So answer me this... which is preferable...
a) wind farms generating safe energy using our free resource i.e. wind, or b) nuclear power stations that have the potential if one goes pop, to render a quarter of our green and pleasant land unusable for hundreds of years?
Budgie, all you're doing is reinforcing your own limited and self serving mindset. I've never bought into the global warming farce and your diatribe about moving economies is absurd and demonstrates you've not read what I've written. It's obvious you're mainly motivated by what you see as 'monstrosities wrecking our countryside' which implies you're just indignant because you'll have to look at them if built. So answer me this... which is preferable... a) wind farms generating safe energy using our free resource i.e. wind, or b) nuclear power stations that have the potential if one goes pop, to render a quarter of our green and pleasant land unusable for hundreds of years? Sorted Echo
  • Score: -7

9:33pm Wed 23 Oct 13

Budgie@home says...

Thank you beerbottle. The bigger picture that our friend refers to is surely that we have to keep the wheels of industry and our economy healthy in the UK from which everything else flows. These carbon taxes and excessive EU regulations are driving manufacturing abroad. Industry in the UK is being penalised for doing its job of keeping our workforce employed but these so called renewable energy developers are rewarded with excessive subsidies for doing what?
Thank you beerbottle. The bigger picture that our friend refers to is surely that we have to keep the wheels of industry and our economy healthy in the UK from which everything else flows. These carbon taxes and excessive EU regulations are driving manufacturing abroad. Industry in the UK is being penalised for doing its job of keeping our workforce employed but these so called renewable energy developers are rewarded with excessive subsidies for doing what? Budgie@home
  • Score: 8

9:37pm Wed 23 Oct 13

Budgie@home says...

Sorted Echo wrote:
Budgie, all you're doing is reinforcing your own limited and self serving mindset. I've never bought into the global warming farce and your diatribe about moving economies is absurd and demonstrates you've not read what I've written. It's obvious you're mainly motivated by what you see as 'monstrosities wrecking our countryside' which implies you're just indignant because you'll have to look at them if built.
So answer me this... which is preferable...
a) wind farms generating safe energy using our free resource i.e. wind, or b) nuclear power stations that have the potential if one goes pop, to render a quarter of our green and pleasant land unusable for hundreds of years?
That one's easy to answer sorted echo its b and you forgot to include fracking which I would have no objections to at all here........
[quote][p][bold]Sorted Echo[/bold] wrote: Budgie, all you're doing is reinforcing your own limited and self serving mindset. I've never bought into the global warming farce and your diatribe about moving economies is absurd and demonstrates you've not read what I've written. It's obvious you're mainly motivated by what you see as 'monstrosities wrecking our countryside' which implies you're just indignant because you'll have to look at them if built. So answer me this... which is preferable... a) wind farms generating safe energy using our free resource i.e. wind, or b) nuclear power stations that have the potential if one goes pop, to render a quarter of our green and pleasant land unusable for hundreds of years?[/p][/quote]That one's easy to answer sorted echo its b and you forgot to include fracking which I would have no objections to at all here........ Budgie@home
  • Score: 4

10:17pm Wed 23 Oct 13

Sorted Echo says...

Budgie, can you not see the irony of your jibe about renewable energy developers getting excessive subsidies? did you not hear that our own government have this week handed a multi billion pound subsidy to France's EDF to build Hinkley along with Chinese investment. That isn't keeping the wheels of industry healthy, it's trying to fix a blow out as the car is crashing.
I'm not surprised by your fracking ideology to be honest and have to assume you don't care about the future generations that will have to suffer the consequences of this disgrace.
Budgie, can you not see the irony of your jibe about renewable energy developers getting excessive subsidies? did you not hear that our own government have this week handed a multi billion pound subsidy to France's EDF to build Hinkley along with Chinese investment. That isn't keeping the wheels of industry healthy, it's trying to fix a blow out as the car is crashing. I'm not surprised by your fracking ideology to be honest and have to assume you don't care about the future generations that will have to suffer the consequences of this disgrace. Sorted Echo
  • Score: 0

3:03pm Thu 24 Oct 13

inquiringmind says...

It seems to me that the word NIMBY should apply equally to nuclear power. France is the world's largest supplier of electricity (and indeed is the UK's largest supplier) which is mostly generated through it's nuclear energy. There are around 60 nuclear power stations in France, 'next door' to the UK. It also seems to me that the only guaranteed, and therefore logical, source of renewable energy is tidal - the tides go in and out like clockwork every day. The same clearly cannot be said of solar or wind energy considering the amount of sunshine and wind required to generate this. The fact that wind farm's are eyesores is all the more galling given that the MAJORITY of our electricity is already generated via nuclear energy, supplied to us by our neighbour.
It seems to me that the word NIMBY should apply equally to nuclear power. France is the world's largest supplier of electricity (and indeed is the UK's largest supplier) which is mostly generated through it's nuclear energy. There are around 60 nuclear power stations in France, 'next door' to the UK. It also seems to me that the only guaranteed, and therefore logical, source of renewable energy is tidal - the tides go in and out like clockwork every day. The same clearly cannot be said of solar or wind energy considering the amount of sunshine and wind required to generate this. The fact that wind farm's are eyesores is all the more galling given that the MAJORITY of our electricity is already generated via nuclear energy, supplied to us by our neighbour. inquiringmind
  • Score: 4

2:14pm Wed 13 Nov 13

wurzelbasher says...

Tidal power is what we should be harnessing, and wave power. Not wind power; it is utterly unreliable!
Tidal power is what we should be harnessing, and wave power. Not wind power; it is utterly unreliable! wurzelbasher
  • Score: 1

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