Windfarm protesters gather to hear campaigner talk

Dorset Echo: CAMPAIGN MEETING: Founder of Dorset Against Rural Turbines Julien Turner speaks at Charminster Village Hall CAMPAIGN MEETING: Founder of Dorset Against Rural Turbines Julien Turner speaks at Charminster Village Hall

WINDFARM protesters gathered in Charminster to hear from a leading campaigner.

Julien Turner, a founding member of DART (Dorset Against Rural Turbines), addressed a packed village hall with members of the community concerned by plans for a windfarm in their area.

Renewable energy firm Broadview Energy Limited is in the early stages of submitting a proposal for a seven-turbine development on agricultural land between Wolfedale Golf Course and Slyer’s Lane.

As well as hearing from Mr Turner, the residents attending the meeting also watched a film about the impact windfarms can have on communities.

Anti-windfarm resident Geoff Markham, who attended the event, said: “We had a very good talk from Julien Turner and a very good film about the effect that wind turbines have had on some people.”

Mr Markham said there was a general view from those attending the meeting that an action committee needed to be set up to voice the concern among local residents.

He said that as far as he was aware almost all of those who attended the meeting were against the plans and the hall was so full that extra seating was required to accommodate everyone.

Mr Markham said: “It was very well attended, everyone there was probably against the project.”

He added that it was also important that people living in Poundbury and Dorchester started to become more aware of the proposals and the impact it could have on the surrounding area.

Broadview claims that the turbines will produce enough electricity to power 7,000 homes and, if the scheme goes ahead, is promising a significant investment programme in the local community.

The company has held exhibitions at St Mary’s School in Charminster and Herrison Hall in Charlton Down to inform residents of the proposals and collect feedback from the community.

Firm 'keen to engage with residents'

BROADVIEW’S project manager Tom Cosgrove said the plans for Slyer’s Lane were still in the early stages and the firm was keen to engage with local residents as it developed them.

He said: “The Slyer’s Lane project is still at a very early stage and we are really focussing on making sure that we speak to as many people in the area as possible so that the community has a real chance to be involved and influence the project.

“We’ve seen a very positive reaction from a number of local residents and it’s clear that people are aware that the way we generate and use energy is changing due to the challenges we face tackling climate change and reducing our reliance on imported fossil fuels.

“The majority of people we’ve spoken to think harnessing renewable energy is a good idea and we’ve now got to ensure that we design the right project for the area, striking the right balance between maximising the amount of clean electricity produced and sensitively managing the project’s integration into the existing environment.”

Comments (11)

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9:06am Tue 3 Dec 13

Budgie@home says...

Thank god someone is doing something about this monstrous proposal that threatens to wreck the local economy with its 415 foot high windfollys.
Thank god someone is doing something about this monstrous proposal that threatens to wreck the local economy with its 415 foot high windfollys. Budgie@home

11:38am Tue 3 Dec 13

dontbuyit says...

Well Budgie are you just a 'nimby' or do you have another solution to replacing fossil fuels as a power source? I think that the shortage of oil and the future high cost of it will wreck the local economy to a far greater degree than the construction of windfarms.
Well Budgie are you just a 'nimby' or do you have another solution to replacing fossil fuels as a power source? I think that the shortage of oil and the future high cost of it will wreck the local economy to a far greater degree than the construction of windfarms. dontbuyit

12:10pm Tue 3 Dec 13

TenBobDylanThomasHardy says...

Careful dontbuyit, logic does not prevail on this Forum.
Careful dontbuyit, logic does not prevail on this Forum. TenBobDylanThomasHardy

1:25pm Tue 3 Dec 13

IDONTKNOWIFITISTRRUE says...

dontbuyit
How about wave power generation which is clean, constant and unseen?
dontbuyit How about wave power generation which is clean, constant and unseen? IDONTKNOWIFITISTRRUE

2:04pm Tue 3 Dec 13

Budgie@home says...

dontbuyit wrote:
Well Budgie are you just a 'nimby' or do you have another solution to replacing fossil fuels as a power source? I think that the shortage of oil and the future high cost of it will wreck the local economy to a far greater degree than the construction of windfarms.
There is no practical alternative to fossil fuels other than nuclear at the moment nor is there any immediate rush to find one unless you are a "warmist" and believe that the UK should lead the world by example, despite the fact that anything we do will have no overall effect on global emissions. The national grid needs to supply a constant amount of electricity at a base level 24/7, it needs to increase capacity on demand which will vary according to the time of day and weather conditions. Please explain how a windfolly fits into this equation with its variable and thus unreliable output. On reflection, no please don't because those of you in favour seem to have a form of religious fervour about these contraptions and reasoning with you is near impossible. I'm proud of being a NIMBY dontbuyit. Still, at least you agree with me that the construction of windfollys may affect the local economy to some extent.
[quote][p][bold]dontbuyit[/bold] wrote: Well Budgie are you just a 'nimby' or do you have another solution to replacing fossil fuels as a power source? I think that the shortage of oil and the future high cost of it will wreck the local economy to a far greater degree than the construction of windfarms.[/p][/quote]There is no practical alternative to fossil fuels other than nuclear at the moment nor is there any immediate rush to find one unless you are a "warmist" and believe that the UK should lead the world by example, despite the fact that anything we do will have no overall effect on global emissions. The national grid needs to supply a constant amount of electricity at a base level 24/7, it needs to increase capacity on demand which will vary according to the time of day and weather conditions. Please explain how a windfolly fits into this equation with its variable and thus unreliable output. On reflection, no please don't because those of you in favour seem to have a form of religious fervour about these contraptions and reasoning with you is near impossible. I'm proud of being a NIMBY dontbuyit. Still, at least you agree with me that the construction of windfollys may affect the local economy to some extent. Budgie@home

3:07pm Tue 3 Dec 13

amaninjapan says...

Just like an addict or alcoholic, we as a nation have a problem with a dependence on fossil fuels. Some people are trying to work within the current capitalist system to help try and alleviate 'Our' dependence problem, by giving people an alternative to dirty fuels. If the change in landscape is a cause for concern (And I'm sure it could well have been for a number of people at the meeting) then I don't think that your opinion is worth considering. But as for the economic argument against the farms, I would really like to hear an alternative to solving this ENERGY PROBLEM that will affect us all. How about this for a redistribution solution...Anyone with more than say 2m pounds in assets (for arguments sake), should have to find their own sources of power. How great would it be if every rural household were responsible for ALL their own resources; Sewage, Water, Gas, Electricity, Heating etc. We would have all kinds of new tech, and old forgotten techniques working together for a greener future.
Just like an addict or alcoholic, we as a nation have a problem with a dependence on fossil fuels. Some people are trying to work within the current capitalist system to help try and alleviate 'Our' dependence problem, by giving people an alternative to dirty fuels. If the change in landscape is a cause for concern (And I'm sure it could well have been for a number of people at the meeting) then I don't think that your opinion is worth considering. But as for the economic argument against the farms, I would really like to hear an alternative to solving this ENERGY PROBLEM that will affect us all. How about this for a redistribution solution...Anyone with more than say 2m pounds in assets (for arguments sake), should have to find their own sources of power. How great would it be if every rural household were responsible for ALL their own resources; Sewage, Water, Gas, Electricity, Heating etc. We would have all kinds of new tech, and old forgotten techniques working together for a greener future. amaninjapan

3:45pm Tue 3 Dec 13

IDONTKNOWIFITISTRRUE says...

amaninjapan says I would really like to hear an alternative to solving this ENERGY PROBLEM that will affect us all.

As I wrote above, generation using water power, tidal power is always available and water power from streams and rivers as an additional source nearer to the point of use.
This would obviate the huge sums of our money going abroad to pay for these wind follies.
amaninjapan says I would really like to hear an alternative to solving this ENERGY PROBLEM that will affect us all. As I wrote above, generation using water power, tidal power is always available and water power from streams and rivers as an additional source nearer to the point of use. This would obviate the huge sums of our money going abroad to pay for these wind follies. IDONTKNOWIFITISTRRUE

4:08pm Tue 3 Dec 13

toyota777 says...

There is alternatives to both fossil fuels and wind follies. I wonder who the local residents were who like the idea.
There is alternatives to both fossil fuels and wind follies. I wonder who the local residents were who like the idea. toyota777

8:20am Wed 4 Dec 13

osmington4 says...

dontbuyit wrote:
Well Budgie are you just a 'nimby' or do you have another solution to replacing fossil fuels as a power source? I think that the shortage of oil and the future high cost of it will wreck the local economy to a far greater degree than the construction of windfarms.
Have you got any idea how much cement needs to fill the earth first, before one of these monsters is stabilised? I bet you haven`t got a clue. We are talking about acres and acres of cement, yes that`s right being poured into the ground and effectively destroying all and sunder in it`s wake. Great isn`t it, fantastic way to conserve the earth by filling it up with cement. So do us a favour and check your facts before you start mouthing off about nimbyism.
[quote][p][bold]dontbuyit[/bold] wrote: Well Budgie are you just a 'nimby' or do you have another solution to replacing fossil fuels as a power source? I think that the shortage of oil and the future high cost of it will wreck the local economy to a far greater degree than the construction of windfarms.[/p][/quote]Have you got any idea how much cement needs to fill the earth first, before one of these monsters is stabilised? I bet you haven`t got a clue. We are talking about acres and acres of cement, yes that`s right being poured into the ground and effectively destroying all and sunder in it`s wake. Great isn`t it, fantastic way to conserve the earth by filling it up with cement. So do us a favour and check your facts before you start mouthing off about nimbyism. osmington4

4:35pm Sun 8 Dec 13

white one says...

Nimby or Wimby?
I know that at present energy generated by wind turbines goes back directly into the National Grid,but imagine this scenario .Electrical energy generated by wind turbines is first supplied to the local area.Now imagine the closure of coal and nuclear power stations as planned by 2020.There are now shortages of electricity at peak times.Thus, those local to wind generators are now in an enviable position.House prices soar as a consequence.Who is now in favour of wind turbines?I'm a Wimby..
Nimby or Wimby? I know that at present energy generated by wind turbines goes back directly into the National Grid,but imagine this scenario .Electrical energy generated by wind turbines is first supplied to the local area.Now imagine the closure of coal and nuclear power stations as planned by 2020.There are now shortages of electricity at peak times.Thus, those local to wind generators are now in an enviable position.House prices soar as a consequence.Who is now in favour of wind turbines?I'm a Wimby.[wanted in my back yard]. white one

8:11am Mon 9 Dec 13

Rocksalt says...

In some ways it's a pity we have a National Grid and pretty much national pricing of electricity and , where available, gas. It would be interesting to see how much more flexible some people would be if they could only have power that was generated locally.
In some ways it's a pity we have a National Grid and pretty much national pricing of electricity and , where available, gas. It would be interesting to see how much more flexible some people would be if they could only have power that was generated locally. Rocksalt

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