Police warning after Dorset residents fall for bank scam

Dorset Echo: Police warning after Dorset residents fall for bank scam Police warning after Dorset residents fall for bank scam

POLICE are urging residents to be vigilant against phone bank scams after a number of people reported falling victim in the last few days.

An appeal was released last week after four reports of a scam where the fraudster posed as a police officer.

Victims were informed of a possible fraudulent transaction in their bank accounts and advised to call the bank to report it.

The scammers then held the phone line open and when the victim tried to phone the bank, they were still connected to the fraudster, divulging bank details to them.

In the last few days, a further 11 crimes of a similar nature have been reported across the county.

Residents are reminded never to reveal personal banking details, never to hand over bank cards to strangers and not to allow unexpected callers in to their homes.

Detective Inspector Mark Samuel of Dorset Police said: “Banks or the police will never ask for a PIN number or ask for money to be transferred in this manner.

“If you are in doubt about the origin of a call, check with your bank. Use a different phone to call the bank to ensure the line has been properly cleared.

“We'd urge people to dismiss any calls they receive like this and report them to police by calling 101 or Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040.”

Comments (4)

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4:32pm Fri 21 Mar 14

Top Gear says...

Some people are so gullible.
Some people are so gullible. Top Gear
  • Score: 5

6:40pm Fri 21 Mar 14

westbaywonder says...

Who was on the phone? George from Fonejacker thats who! LOL
Who was on the phone? George from Fonejacker thats who! LOL westbaywonder
  • Score: 1

3:39pm Sat 22 Mar 14

weymouthfox says...

I am amazed so many people fall for these scams. I had a call from a man with a thick asian accent who was concerned that my pc had a serious virus which would wipe out the hard disk. He could clear it for me and save me from computer oblivion!
I told him he was a fool and a scammer, then put the phone down. I don't think he will call again.
I am amazed so many people fall for these scams. I had a call from a man with a thick asian accent who was concerned that my pc had a serious virus which would wipe out the hard disk. He could clear it for me and save me from computer oblivion! I told him he was a fool and a scammer, then put the phone down. I don't think he will call again. weymouthfox
  • Score: 4

12:43am Sun 23 Mar 14

Micke12 says...

weymouthfox wrote:
I am amazed so many people fall for these scams. I had a call from a man with a thick asian accent who was concerned that my pc had a serious virus which would wipe out the hard disk. He could clear it for me and save me from computer oblivion!
I told him he was a fool and a scammer, then put the phone down. I don't think he will call again.
They will, you mark my words. I have had some similar calls in the last year or so, and fortunately, being clued up to these scams I did not fall for it one bit - I usually tell them to get lost or I will find out where they are and blow them away.

My advantage is that I am well clued up on computers as I build and fix them as a hobby, but unfortunately, not all people are as clued up as the rest of us, whether IT scams or bank scams - some of these computer problem scams lead you to believe they are calling from Microsoft Technical Support, but Microsoft will never make such calls **** that sort of information is not transmitted to Microsoft from your PC. Also, be aware, that your bank will never ask you personal details over the phone and will never ever request you to divulge your bank card PIN, they will usually ask you for a security code or parts of a security code totally unconnected to the numbers of your card. NEVER EVER GIVE OUT YOUR PIN, NOT TO POLICE, BANK STAFF or any other person. The only person who should know or have possession of your card PIN is you.

If in doubt, phone you local bank to verify the caller before giving out that info, but never ever give out PIN, or the 16 digit card number on the front of your card unless you have initiated the transaction.

Bank security technology is pretty impressive these days, and any transaction that does have the correct CCV code will be refused if anyone tries to use the card info, so never give out the last three digits on the back of the card over the phone or on line unless you fully trust the person you are divulging the info too, and above all, when doing financial transactions on line, always look for the letters 'HTTPS and a padlock symbol in your browsers address bar. If there is no 'HTTPS on the page requesting you to enter your financial information, then the data transmitted will not be secure and the info is being transmitted in an unencrypted form. The banks will do their best to protect you and your money, but if you give out info that is confidential, without checking for the authenticity of the payee, you will be held liable for that transaction and any subsequent transactions.

If you think your card security has been compromised, then contact your banks lost or stolen cards hotline immediately and cancel the card - better to have no card for a few days than to have your account cleared by some scammers.

If in doubt, don't give out the details, but more importantly, remember to shred documents before disposing of them to prevent bin raiders from getting all that personal info that will enable them to open accounts in your name and get loans and other forms of credit using your details.

If you are ever scammed, tell the police to make a record of it so that if someone does get brought to book, they can put that matter to any suspect they may arrest at a later date. If the police have not been informed, they cannot do anything about it, but if it is recorded as a crime, then it can possibly be, that at a later date, someone might be nicked and you could be compensated.

Be careful out their people, there are a lot of 'sharks' out there quite happy to steal your money.
[quote][p][bold]weymouthfox[/bold] wrote: I am amazed so many people fall for these scams. I had a call from a man with a thick asian accent who was concerned that my pc had a serious virus which would wipe out the hard disk. He could clear it for me and save me from computer oblivion! I told him he was a fool and a scammer, then put the phone down. I don't think he will call again.[/p][/quote]They will, you mark my words. I have had some similar calls in the last year or so, and fortunately, being clued up to these scams I did not fall for it one bit - I usually tell them to get lost or I will find out where they are and blow them away. My advantage is that I am well clued up on computers as I build and fix them as a hobby, but unfortunately, not all people are as clued up as the rest of us, whether IT scams or bank scams - some of these computer problem scams lead you to believe they are calling from Microsoft Technical Support, but Microsoft will never make such calls **** that sort of information is not transmitted to Microsoft from your PC. Also, be aware, that your bank will never ask you personal details over the phone and will never ever request you to divulge your bank card PIN, they will usually ask you for a security code or parts of a security code totally unconnected to the numbers of your card. NEVER EVER GIVE OUT YOUR PIN, NOT TO POLICE, BANK STAFF or any other person. The only person who should know or have possession of your card PIN is you. If in doubt, phone you local bank to verify the caller before giving out that info, but never ever give out PIN, or the 16 digit card number on the front of your card unless you have initiated the transaction. Bank security technology is pretty impressive these days, and any transaction that does have the correct CCV code will be refused if anyone tries to use the card info, so never give out the last three digits on the back of the card over the phone or on line unless you fully trust the person you are divulging the info too, and above all, when doing financial transactions on line, always look for the letters 'HTTPS and a padlock symbol in your browsers address bar. If there is no 'HTTPS on the page requesting you to enter your financial information, then the data transmitted will not be secure and the info is being transmitted in an unencrypted form. The banks will do their best to protect you and your money, but if you give out info that is confidential, without checking for the authenticity of the payee, you will be held liable for that transaction and any subsequent transactions. If you think your card security has been compromised, then contact your banks lost or stolen cards hotline immediately and cancel the card - better to have no card for a few days than to have your account cleared by some scammers. If in doubt, don't give out the details, but more importantly, remember to shred documents before disposing of them to prevent bin raiders from getting all that personal info that will enable them to open accounts in your name and get loans and other forms of credit using your details. If you are ever scammed, tell the police to make a record of it so that if someone does get brought to book, they can put that matter to any suspect they may arrest at a later date. If the police have not been informed, they cannot do anything about it, but if it is recorded as a crime, then it can possibly be, that at a later date, someone might be nicked and you could be compensated. Be careful out their people, there are a lot of 'sharks' out there quite happy to steal your money. Micke12
  • Score: 2

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