Dorchester runners take on London Marathon to raise funds for worthy causes

Town runners take on London Marathon to raise funds for worthy causes

GREAT EFFORT: Ben Wylie and dad Phil

TOGETHER: Lucy Russell, Holly Parkin and Debbie Seeley

First published in News Dorset Echo: Photograph of the Author by , Dorchester reporter

DORCHESTER runners who went through the pain barrier for charity are recovering from their London Marathon efforts.

Fundraisers from the county town were among the 36,000 runners who took on the 26-mile course in the capital.

They picked up well-earned finishers’ medals after completing the iconic course and raised thousands of pounds for their chosen causes.

Friends Debbie Seeley and Holly Parkin crossed the line together in a time of five hours and 13 minutes, with Holly braving the pain of a fracture to her shin.

They have raised nearly £5,000 between them for the British Heart Foundation – a cause close to both of their hearts as they were inspired by the memories of loved ones they had lost.

Debbie said: “It was really good, the atmosphere was amazing.

“We came through together, it was lovely.

“It was a really great day and I would highly recommend it to anyone.”

Holly and Debbie were joined at the finish line by friend and fellow county town runner Lucy Russell, who raised £2,000 for the British Red Cross after completing the run in six hours and 13 minutes.

Dorset County Hospital paediatrician Phil Wylie took the marathon with 19-year-old son Ben and they also crossed the line together.

The pair, who were running for Parkinson’s UK, completed the course in four hours and 25 minutes.

Ben said: “It was incredible and we’re both really proud.

“There were some points where we allowed each other to take a break but we were spurring each other on the whole way round.”

The father and son duo raised more than £5,000 for their chosen cause.

Helen Hodgetts, manager of the Julia’s House charity shop in Dorchester, was running for the children’s hospice and came across the finish line in a time of three hours and fifty minutes.

Georgina Kosnar, from Poundbury, was running for the Cystic Fibrosis Trust and clocked five hours and 44 minutes.

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