UPDATE: Giant jellyfish warning after another is spotted off Weymouth

Nathan Rodd spotted this barrel jellyfish off Weymouth's Pleasure Pier

Suzanne Sheldon discovered this jellyfish washed up on Portland beach

First published in News
Last updated

ANOTHER giant jellyfish has been spotted off Weymouth, sparking fears of an invasion.

As reported in the Echo, Suzanne Sheldon found one washed-up barrel jellyfish on Portland beach.

Of her discovery, Suzanne, 48, said: "It was at least three feet in width and was very bulky too. It was the largest jellyfish I have ever seen."

But now she is not the only one to spot one of the creatures in the area- a worker at Weymouth's Sea Life Tower took a snap when he spotted one in the sea yesterday evening. 

Nathan Rodd said: "I saw a jellyfish from the top of the Tower at around 5pm yesterday, so I rushed down to take a couple of shots as the jellyfish was right at the end of the Pleasure Pier, just underneath the Tower. 

"I've been seeing them all week, but this time I managed to get a couple of pictures."

Experts are warning that more residents could make similar discoveries thanks to warmer weather.

The Marine Conservation Society, to which Suzanne reported the find, is keen to hear from anyone else who finds jellyfish washed-up.

Richard Harrington, from the Marine Conservation Society, said: “This predicted hot weather to come could mean even more jellyfish are likely to wash up or be in the seas.

“Although this species is harmless their numbers are likely to grow fairly quickly as sea temperatures rise. We are very keen to hear from people that find any washed up anywhere around the country.

“This is an Atlantic species and are sometimes found washed up but still advise the public not to touch them”.

A warmer winter also means it could be a bumper year for insects in the county too.

Temperatures rarely dropped below freezing during one of the warmest winters on record. And that will have an inevitable impact on the pest population for the rest of the year, according to Rob Simpson, of pest controllers register Basis Prompt.

He said: “The numbers of many insects in the UK are naturally diminished by cold win ters, but the weather has been very different this year.

“Temperatures all over the country have been much warmer than normal and that could lead to a significant increase in the pest population.

“Flies, fleas, ants and wasps that would usually remain dormant for much longer will become active sooner, leading to more prolific breeding trends and therefore a larger population.

“We’ll only know for sure later in the year, but it could be that we’re facing a summer of bugs.”

Comments (6)

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12:46pm Tue 6 May 14

Bollard says...

What hot weather? There's none forecast!
What hot weather? There's none forecast! Bollard
  • Score: 0

1:24pm Tue 6 May 14

Get a grip says...

They are after your job.

Vote UKIP
They are after your job. Vote UKIP Get a grip
  • Score: 4

2:34pm Tue 6 May 14

shy talk says...

Already seen a few “huge barrel jellyfish” sunning themselves on Weymouth beach this weekend, not a pretty sight.
Already seen a few “huge barrel jellyfish” sunning themselves on Weymouth beach this weekend, not a pretty sight. shy talk
  • Score: 6

10:19pm Tue 6 May 14

Parkstreetshufle says...

But how will be distinguish them from local senior civil servants?
But how will be distinguish them from local senior civil servants? Parkstreetshufle
  • Score: 0

6:28pm Wed 7 May 14

veronica58 says...

Great headline - a wether is a castrated ram!
Great headline - a wether is a castrated ram! veronica58
  • Score: 1

3:44pm Fri 9 May 14

JamesYoung says...

A common sight in our seas, nothing unusual. I remember back in 1987, sailing with a school friend in his little dinghy, looking down at layers and layers of these huge jellyfish.
Can somebody please explain how the word "warning" relates to anything in the article? Sounds like an expert said "they are harmless, but best not to touch them", presumably in case a manowar washes up as one occasionally does. Hardly justification for the headline though, is it?
A common sight in our seas, nothing unusual. I remember back in 1987, sailing with a school friend in his little dinghy, looking down at layers and layers of these huge jellyfish. Can somebody please explain how the word "warning" relates to anything in the article? Sounds like an expert said "they are harmless, but best not to touch them", presumably in case a manowar washes up as one occasionally does. Hardly justification for the headline though, is it? JamesYoung
  • Score: 0

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