Weymouth and Portland has highest proportion of part-time workers in the country

Dorset Echo: St Mary Street in Weymouth St Mary Street in Weymouth

WEYMOUTH and Portland has the highest proportion of part-time employees in the country, according to new figures.

Data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS), reveal that 41 per cent of all workers in Weymouth and Portland work part time, compared to an average of 30 to 32 per cent for England and Wales.

Business leaders have pointed to the borough having a large amount of tourism and service industry-related firms.

The newly released report, ‘Workplace population analysis, 2011 Census’, also showed West Dorset has the fifth highest proportion of 50-64 year-old workers in the local workplace population, at 32 per cent, compared to an average of 25 per cent for England and Wales as a whole.

Most Weymouth and Portland workers don’t travel outside the area for work either, as 62 per cent of employed people travelled less than 6.2 miles between their homes and workplaces.

Weymouth and Portland Mayor elect Kate Wheller, a Labour borough and county councillor said the data on part time workers was evidence that people were finding it hard to gain full time employment and earn enough money to live comfortably.

She said: “It’s clearly the case that people do struggle if they are in part-time work. Many do require top-up benefits to get enough money to make ends meet. A lot of people are on zero hours contracts too, so particularly in the tourist industry if they are not needed or the weather isn’t great they have no work. It’s very difficult for people to budget sensibly as a result.”

“It demonstrates the need for a really, really strong relationship on the council to encourage more diverse industry into the area.”

Nigel Reed from Weymouth BID pointed to the large amount of Weymouth businesses that are based on service and tourism.

He said: “From a business point of view, catering and tourism-related industries are a significant part of the local economy in Weymouth and Portland and by nature they employ part-time people.

“I think there’s an element of that, and a lifestyle element in that more people are going for a work-life balance and want to work fewer hours.”

Comments (9)

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10:26am Sat 24 May 14

Sidney Hall says...

If Nigel Reed really said that last quote then he is not fit for purpose of the BID. Or maybe its a self-serving organisation. What people want locally is opportunities of quality employment and careers. People cant pay rent and mortgages by selling ice cream for kiosk owners May-Sept. Yet this town bangs on about the plight of hoteliers, laser lights, ferry boats and and an observation tower, and ignoring the real needs of the area. Attract some proper employment to the are for crying out loud! Any kids leaving school who aspire to more than care home assistants and hairdressing will leave the area. Is that what we really want??
If Nigel Reed really said that last quote then he is not fit for purpose of the BID. Or maybe its a self-serving organisation. What people want locally is opportunities of quality employment and careers. People cant pay rent and mortgages by selling ice cream for kiosk owners May-Sept. Yet this town bangs on about the plight of hoteliers, laser lights, ferry boats and and an observation tower, and ignoring the real needs of the area. Attract some proper employment to the are for crying out loud! Any kids leaving school who aspire to more than care home assistants and hairdressing will leave the area. Is that what we really want?? Sidney Hall
  • Score: 29

11:02am Sat 24 May 14

JamesYoung says...

Sidney Hall wrote:
If Nigel Reed really said that last quote then he is not fit for purpose of the BID. Or maybe its a self-serving organisation. What people want locally is opportunities of quality employment and careers. People cant pay rent and mortgages by selling ice cream for kiosk owners May-Sept. Yet this town bangs on about the plight of hoteliers, laser lights, ferry boats and and an observation tower, and ignoring the real needs of the area. Attract some proper employment to the are for crying out loud! Any kids leaving school who aspire to more than care home assistants and hairdressing will leave the area. Is that what we really want??
Spot on. Sadly, that won't happen without some creative thinking and until the hoteliers have had their stranglehold on local politics broken. Weymouth's development is utterly dependent on new road and rail infrastructure, but with even the brown route opposed for 30 years, i won't see it in my lifetime.
[quote][p][bold]Sidney Hall[/bold] wrote: If Nigel Reed really said that last quote then he is not fit for purpose of the BID. Or maybe its a self-serving organisation. What people want locally is opportunities of quality employment and careers. People cant pay rent and mortgages by selling ice cream for kiosk owners May-Sept. Yet this town bangs on about the plight of hoteliers, laser lights, ferry boats and and an observation tower, and ignoring the real needs of the area. Attract some proper employment to the are for crying out loud! Any kids leaving school who aspire to more than care home assistants and hairdressing will leave the area. Is that what we really want??[/p][/quote]Spot on. Sadly, that won't happen without some creative thinking and until the hoteliers have had their stranglehold on local politics broken. Weymouth's development is utterly dependent on new road and rail infrastructure, but with even the brown route opposed for 30 years, i won't see it in my lifetime. JamesYoung
  • Score: 12

11:10am Sat 24 May 14

Caption Sensible says...

"Any kids leaving school who aspire to more than care home assistants and hairdressing will leave the area. Is that what we really want??"

Like I did and had to.

It is a paradox but Weymouth's biggest employer (tourism) is also its biggest constraint to career aspiration.

The sooner dependency on tourism is relaxed and something along the lines of a knowledge-based, entrepreneurial economy is developed, the better in my opinion.

I think a good start would be to encourage the setting-up of either a local university campus in the area, or a dedicated University of Weymouth or Dorset is founded.
"Any kids leaving school who aspire to more than care home assistants and hairdressing will leave the area. Is that what we really want??" Like I did and had to. It is a paradox but Weymouth's biggest employer (tourism) is also its biggest constraint to career aspiration. The sooner dependency on tourism is relaxed and something along the lines of a knowledge-based, entrepreneurial economy is developed, the better in my opinion. I think a good start would be to encourage the setting-up of either a local university campus in the area, or a dedicated University of Weymouth or Dorset is founded. Caption Sensible
  • Score: 15

11:14am Sat 24 May 14

iansedwell says...

'Nigel Reed from Weymouth BID pointed to the large amount of Weymouth businesses that are based on service and tourism.

He said: “From a business point of view, catering and tourism-related industries are a significant part of the local economy in Weymouth and Portland and by nature they employ part-time people.

“I think there’s an element of that, and a lifestyle element in that more people are going for a work-life balance and want to work fewer hours.”'

Let's look at that last paragraph... So people struggling to make ends meet are going for a lifestyle choice?

How out of touch are you Mr Reed? People want real jobs - full-time, all-year jobs. Perhaps if W&PBC and BID spent more time promoting the area, bringing in investment, encouraging development, looking to drag Weymouth away from its reliance on tourism instead of espousing such complacent attitudes, the Borough might begin to make economic and social progress.

Have you been to Dorchester recently? Have you seen what has been achieved in what was a rather tired, drab, run-down County town? Why can the same thing not be achieved in Weymouth and Portland? Or must we forever pander to the hoteliers, guest house owners, beach caterers - all good and worthy additions to the local economy, it must be agreed, but surely not viable as the bedrock of a modern, vibrant town with a diverse economy founded on a powerful strategic vision of how to grow over the next twenty or so years.

What? We haven't got one? Neither BID nor W&PBC have developed one?

Have another ice-cream Mr Reed, no doubt one served to you by a citizen revelling in their 'lifestyle choice'.
'Nigel Reed from Weymouth BID pointed to the large amount of Weymouth businesses that are based on service and tourism. He said: “From a business point of view, catering and tourism-related industries are a significant part of the local economy in Weymouth and Portland and by nature they employ part-time people. “I think there’s an element of that, and a lifestyle element in that more people are going for a work-life balance and want to work fewer hours.”' Let's look at that last paragraph... So people struggling to make ends meet are going for a lifestyle choice? How out of touch are you Mr Reed? People want real jobs - full-time, all-year jobs. Perhaps if W&PBC and BID spent more time promoting the area, bringing in investment, encouraging development, looking to drag Weymouth away from its reliance on tourism instead of espousing such complacent attitudes, the Borough might begin to make economic and social progress. Have you been to Dorchester recently? Have you seen what has been achieved in what was a rather tired, drab, run-down County town? Why can the same thing not be achieved in Weymouth and Portland? Or must we forever pander to the hoteliers, guest house owners, beach caterers - all good and worthy additions to the local economy, it must be agreed, but surely not viable as the bedrock of a modern, vibrant town with a diverse economy founded on a powerful strategic vision of how to grow over the next twenty or so years. What? We haven't got one? Neither BID nor W&PBC have developed one? Have another ice-cream Mr Reed, no doubt one served to you by a citizen revelling in their 'lifestyle choice'. iansedwell
  • Score: 11

11:20am Sat 24 May 14

annotater says...

Caption Sensible wrote:
"Any kids leaving school who aspire to more than care home assistants and hairdressing will leave the area. Is that what we really want??"

Like I did and had to.

It is a paradox but Weymouth's biggest employer (tourism) is also its biggest constraint to career aspiration.

The sooner dependency on tourism is relaxed and something along the lines of a knowledge-based, entrepreneurial economy is developed, the better in my opinion.

I think a good start would be to encourage the setting-up of either a local university campus in the area, or a dedicated University of Weymouth or Dorset is founded.
I don't know about you but I remember the Teachers Training College, South Dorset Technical College, AUWE(S) and AUWE(N). Winfrith Atomic Energy Authority, The Dockyard, Portland Bone Hospital, Weymouth and Risk it and holiday based seasonal trade.
Sadly all apart from the latter have gone and will not return.
[quote][p][bold]Caption Sensible[/bold] wrote: "Any kids leaving school who aspire to more than care home assistants and hairdressing will leave the area. Is that what we really want??" Like I did and had to. It is a paradox but Weymouth's biggest employer (tourism) is also its biggest constraint to career aspiration. The sooner dependency on tourism is relaxed and something along the lines of a knowledge-based, entrepreneurial economy is developed, the better in my opinion. I think a good start would be to encourage the setting-up of either a local university campus in the area, or a dedicated University of Weymouth or Dorset is founded.[/p][/quote]I don't know about you but I remember the Teachers Training College, South Dorset Technical College, AUWE(S) and AUWE(N). Winfrith Atomic Energy Authority, The Dockyard, Portland Bone Hospital, Weymouth and Risk it and holiday based seasonal trade. Sadly all apart from the latter have gone and will not return. annotater
  • Score: 16

11:42am Sat 24 May 14

Caption Sensible says...

annotater wrote:
Caption Sensible wrote:
"Any kids leaving school who aspire to more than care home assistants and hairdressing will leave the area. Is that what we really want??"

Like I did and had to.

It is a paradox but Weymouth's biggest employer (tourism) is also its biggest constraint to career aspiration.

The sooner dependency on tourism is relaxed and something along the lines of a knowledge-based, entrepreneurial economy is developed, the better in my opinion.

I think a good start would be to encourage the setting-up of either a local university campus in the area, or a dedicated University of Weymouth or Dorset is founded.
I don't know about you but I remember the Teachers Training College, South Dorset Technical College, AUWE(S) and AUWE(N). Winfrith Atomic Energy Authority, The Dockyard, Portland Bone Hospital, Weymouth and Risk it and holiday based seasonal trade.
Sadly all apart from the latter have gone and will not return.
I remember, and the Weymouth area was a far better place for it.

The harbour was a proper working harbour as well then. I also remember my uncle (who was a docks crane driver) saying to me; "The council are going to run the harbour down and it will be just for pleasure/leisure purposes". How prophetic was that.

My advice is: If a prospective councillor comes knocking on your door and cannot offer you a viable 20-year visionary plan for the area, slam the door in that person's face!
[quote][p][bold]annotater[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Caption Sensible[/bold] wrote: "Any kids leaving school who aspire to more than care home assistants and hairdressing will leave the area. Is that what we really want??" Like I did and had to. It is a paradox but Weymouth's biggest employer (tourism) is also its biggest constraint to career aspiration. The sooner dependency on tourism is relaxed and something along the lines of a knowledge-based, entrepreneurial economy is developed, the better in my opinion. I think a good start would be to encourage the setting-up of either a local university campus in the area, or a dedicated University of Weymouth or Dorset is founded.[/p][/quote]I don't know about you but I remember the Teachers Training College, South Dorset Technical College, AUWE(S) and AUWE(N). Winfrith Atomic Energy Authority, The Dockyard, Portland Bone Hospital, Weymouth and Risk it and holiday based seasonal trade. Sadly all apart from the latter have gone and will not return.[/p][/quote]I remember, and the Weymouth area was a far better place for it. The harbour was a proper working harbour as well then. I also remember my uncle (who was a docks crane driver) saying to me; "The council are going to run the harbour down and it will be just for pleasure/leisure purposes". How prophetic was that. My advice is: If a prospective councillor comes knocking on your door and cannot offer you a viable 20-year visionary plan for the area, slam the door in that person's face! Caption Sensible
  • Score: 15

12:51am Sun 25 May 14

randomperson says...

Caption Sensible wrote:
"Any kids leaving school who aspire to more than care home assistants and hairdressing will leave the area. Is that what we really want??"

Like I did and had to.

It is a paradox but Weymouth's biggest employer (tourism) is also its biggest constraint to career aspiration.

The sooner dependency on tourism is relaxed and something along the lines of a knowledge-based, entrepreneurial economy is developed, the better in my opinion.

I think a good start would be to encourage the setting-up of either a local university campus in the area, or a dedicated University of Weymouth or Dorset is founded.
Another here who has left. Agree with every word.

As for the last paragraph in the article, if this is typical of the leadership in various organisations the town has had and continues to have, no wonder it's in such a state.
[quote][p][bold]Caption Sensible[/bold] wrote: "Any kids leaving school who aspire to more than care home assistants and hairdressing will leave the area. Is that what we really want??" Like I did and had to. It is a paradox but Weymouth's biggest employer (tourism) is also its biggest constraint to career aspiration. The sooner dependency on tourism is relaxed and something along the lines of a knowledge-based, entrepreneurial economy is developed, the better in my opinion. I think a good start would be to encourage the setting-up of either a local university campus in the area, or a dedicated University of Weymouth or Dorset is founded.[/p][/quote]Another here who has left. Agree with every word. As for the last paragraph in the article, if this is typical of the leadership in various organisations the town has had and continues to have, no wonder it's in such a state. randomperson
  • Score: 6

8:53am Sun 25 May 14

navelgazer says...

How appropriate then that Nigel Reed posed as the Mad Hatter in Sandworld’s portrayal of Alice in Wonderland (Echo articles on 15th and 18th April 2014)


http://www.dorsetech
o.co.uk/news/1114903
7.Alice_in_Wonderlan
d_fun_for_all_the_fa
mily/
---------- and ----------
http://www.dorsetech
o.co.uk/news/1115907
9.Meet_the_Mad_Hatte
r_for_Alice_in_Wonde
rland_adventures/
How appropriate then that Nigel Reed posed as the Mad Hatter in Sandworld’s portrayal of Alice in Wonderland (Echo articles on 15th and 18th April 2014) http://www.dorsetech o.co.uk/news/1114903 7.Alice_in_Wonderlan d_fun_for_all_the_fa mily/ ---------- and ---------- http://www.dorsetech o.co.uk/news/1115907 9.Meet_the_Mad_Hatte r_for_Alice_in_Wonde rland_adventures/ navelgazer
  • Score: 0

9:12am Sun 25 May 14

Simon Nicholas says...

Caption Sensible wrote:
annotater wrote:
Caption Sensible wrote:
"Any kids leaving school who aspire to more than care home assistants and hairdressing will leave the area. Is that what we really want??"

Like I did and had to.

It is a paradox but Weymouth's biggest employer (tourism) is also its biggest constraint to career aspiration.

The sooner dependency on tourism is relaxed and something along the lines of a knowledge-based, entrepreneurial economy is developed, the better in my opinion.

I think a good start would be to encourage the setting-up of either a local university campus in the area, or a dedicated University of Weymouth or Dorset is founded.
I don't know about you but I remember the Teachers Training College, South Dorset Technical College, AUWE(S) and AUWE(N). Winfrith Atomic Energy Authority, The Dockyard, Portland Bone Hospital, Weymouth and Risk it and holiday based seasonal trade.
Sadly all apart from the latter have gone and will not return.
I remember, and the Weymouth area was a far better place for it.

The harbour was a proper working harbour as well then. I also remember my uncle (who was a docks crane driver) saying to me; "The council are going to run the harbour down and it will be just for pleasure/leisure purposes". How prophetic was that.

My advice is: If a prospective councillor comes knocking on your door and cannot offer you a viable 20-year visionary plan for the area, slam the door in that person's face!
Point taken on the harbour, but the move of the freight (mainly imports and exports to / from the Channlel Islands), to Portsmouth many years ago, was always going to happen unfortunately. Don`t forget also that when Weymouth was last a proper working harbour, it was dependent on Sealink, a highly unionised and loss making state organisation.

To be fair to Condor however, they do have a fair number of jobs at the ferry terminal in reservations, maintenance and back office support, all of which are full time.

Simon N.
[quote][p][bold]Caption Sensible[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]annotater[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Caption Sensible[/bold] wrote: "Any kids leaving school who aspire to more than care home assistants and hairdressing will leave the area. Is that what we really want??" Like I did and had to. It is a paradox but Weymouth's biggest employer (tourism) is also its biggest constraint to career aspiration. The sooner dependency on tourism is relaxed and something along the lines of a knowledge-based, entrepreneurial economy is developed, the better in my opinion. I think a good start would be to encourage the setting-up of either a local university campus in the area, or a dedicated University of Weymouth or Dorset is founded.[/p][/quote]I don't know about you but I remember the Teachers Training College, South Dorset Technical College, AUWE(S) and AUWE(N). Winfrith Atomic Energy Authority, The Dockyard, Portland Bone Hospital, Weymouth and Risk it and holiday based seasonal trade. Sadly all apart from the latter have gone and will not return.[/p][/quote]I remember, and the Weymouth area was a far better place for it. The harbour was a proper working harbour as well then. I also remember my uncle (who was a docks crane driver) saying to me; "The council are going to run the harbour down and it will be just for pleasure/leisure purposes". How prophetic was that. My advice is: If a prospective councillor comes knocking on your door and cannot offer you a viable 20-year visionary plan for the area, slam the door in that person's face![/p][/quote]Point taken on the harbour, but the move of the freight (mainly imports and exports to / from the Channlel Islands), to Portsmouth many years ago, was always going to happen unfortunately. Don`t forget also that when Weymouth was last a proper working harbour, it was dependent on Sealink, a highly unionised and loss making state organisation. To be fair to Condor however, they do have a fair number of jobs at the ferry terminal in reservations, maintenance and back office support, all of which are full time. Simon N. Simon Nicholas
  • Score: 3

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