Council admits Weymouth Football Club homes argument is ‘fatally compromised’

Dorset Echo: ARTIST’S VIEW: Weymouth FC homes plan ARTIST’S VIEW: Weymouth FC homes plan

COUNCIL chiefs preparing to fight a plan to build up to 170 homes at Weymouth Football Club admit there is a flaw in their main argument due to criticism over future housing supply calculations.

The battle to redevelop at the Bob Lucas Stadium is to be thrashed out at a public inquiry after Wessex Delivery LLP appealed West Dorset District Council’s decision to refuse.

But the council’s main defence – that the ground is not in an agreed development area and that a five-year plan for housing is already in place – is ‘fatally compromised’ because housing targets have come under fire, and figures in the local plan it is working on with Weymouth and Portland Borough Council have had to be reviewed.

The council’s argument is ‘certain to fail’ and would lead to a bill for costs, a report says.

Instead it will have to be fought on the grounds there will be a loss of playing fields and there is not enough affordable housing, open space and local amenities in line with policies.

A report to Thursday’s development control committee says the position has changed due to recent appeal decisions which have criticised the use of the local plan target to demonstrate a five-year land supply for housing. This includes the inspector deciding the Curtis Fields application in Weymouth.

It comes as the district and borough councils were forced to look again at their joint draft local plan for development after a planning inspector raised questions about the proposed housing supply.

After months of further work, officers are now proposing a provision of more than 100 homes a year extra – 775 units compared to previous projection of between 617 and 661 per annum.

This translates as 15,500 homes over the 20-year plan period, compared to an original figure of between 12,340 and 13,220.

A number of controversial sites were withdrawn from the original plan during public consultation, including land to the south east of Dorchester allocated for 1,000 homes.

A report to the district council’s executive committee today states: “A number of sites have been subject to consultation previously and taken out of the plan, and the majority of these would all need to be brought back into the plan if the requirement to 2031 were to be met.”

However, with a need to get a local plan in place as soon as possible, a better approach would be a plan with a housing supply until 2028.

With revised work seeing the housing supply figure the council is currently able to put forward raised to 13,749 without the need for any further development allocations, this would would be sufficient to cover until 2028.

A further 1,751 homes would be needed to extend the period until 2031.

The move could see Weymouth and Portland taking some of the brunt for West Dorset during the first phase.

Councillors will be asked to revise the housing requirement and revise the plan period to 2028.

County and district councillor Andy Canning said he hoped the need for more homes would not see sites like the one on the edge of Dorchester put back on the agenda.

He said: “We need to look at sites within the town such as the prison to meet some of the requirements.”

Comments (28)

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6:03am Tue 17 Jun 14

PHonnor says...

So, because WDDC/W&PBC couldn't get their act together WFC could suffer? That seems fair.....not!
So, because WDDC/W&PBC couldn't get their act together WFC could suffer? That seems fair.....not! PHonnor
  • Score: -5

8:54am Tue 17 Jun 14

Rodwellocal says...

In an effort to meet both the housing supply needs and the football clubs needs, could consideration be given to relocating the club to the marsh as part of the sports amenity future for the marsh? The club would be accessable and could form a hub for the other sports & recreational facilities at the marsh.
In an effort to meet both the housing supply needs and the football clubs needs, could consideration be given to relocating the club to the marsh as part of the sports amenity future for the marsh? The club would be accessable and could form a hub for the other sports & recreational facilities at the marsh. Rodwellocal
  • Score: 3

9:59am Tue 17 Jun 14

elloello1980 says...

Rodwellocal wrote:
In an effort to meet both the housing supply needs and the football clubs needs, could consideration be given to relocating the club to the marsh as part of the sports amenity future for the marsh? The club would be accessable and could form a hub for the other sports & recreational facilities at the marsh.
No! The marsh should remain a playing area for our children
[quote][p][bold]Rodwellocal[/bold] wrote: In an effort to meet both the housing supply needs and the football clubs needs, could consideration be given to relocating the club to the marsh as part of the sports amenity future for the marsh? The club would be accessable and could form a hub for the other sports & recreational facilities at the marsh.[/p][/quote]No! The marsh should remain a playing area for our children elloello1980
  • Score: 9

9:59am Tue 17 Jun 14

elloello1980 says...

Rodwellocal wrote:
In an effort to meet both the housing supply needs and the football clubs needs, could consideration be given to relocating the club to the marsh as part of the sports amenity future for the marsh? The club would be accessable and could form a hub for the other sports & recreational facilities at the marsh.
No! The marsh should remain a playing area for our children
[quote][p][bold]Rodwellocal[/bold] wrote: In an effort to meet both the housing supply needs and the football clubs needs, could consideration be given to relocating the club to the marsh as part of the sports amenity future for the marsh? The club would be accessable and could form a hub for the other sports & recreational facilities at the marsh.[/p][/quote]No! The marsh should remain a playing area for our children elloello1980
  • Score: 0

10:49am Tue 17 Jun 14

jjlad2 says...

I'm thinking why has no one come up with utalising the Rugby area, plenty of room for Rugby and Football, build a new Clubhouse, you already have the park and ride car park, its convieniate for traffic as well. easy fix and makes sense to me.
I'm thinking why has no one come up with utalising the Rugby area, plenty of room for Rugby and Football, build a new Clubhouse, you already have the park and ride car park, its convieniate for traffic as well. easy fix and makes sense to me. jjlad2
  • Score: 9

10:49am Tue 17 Jun 14

JamesYoung says...

We don't need more homes.
The ratio of bedrooms to people is higher than it has ever been.
There are over a million empty homes across the country.
Across the country, rents are rising at less than the rate of inflation. If we needed more homes, demand for rented homes would be rising in line with house prices.
This is all a government driven ponzi scheme. House prices fell after 2008, even though the population continued to rise. Why? Because the banks stopped lending.
Now, encouraged by billions of pounds of printed money, the banks are lending stupid amounts again.
Does anybody seriously think that developers will ask less for new homes, which they should if supply is increasing? No.
My prediction is that within 2-3 years we'll have a property crash that will trap the feckless in negative equity and will return house prices to where they historically should be.
We don't need more homes. The ratio of bedrooms to people is higher than it has ever been. There are over a million empty homes across the country. Across the country, rents are rising at less than the rate of inflation. If we needed more homes, demand for rented homes would be rising in line with house prices. This is all a government driven ponzi scheme. House prices fell after 2008, even though the population continued to rise. Why? Because the banks stopped lending. Now, encouraged by billions of pounds of printed money, the banks are lending stupid amounts again. Does anybody seriously think that developers will ask less for new homes, which they should if supply is increasing? No. My prediction is that within 2-3 years we'll have a property crash that will trap the feckless in negative equity and will return house prices to where they historically should be. JamesYoung
  • Score: 5

10:56am Tue 17 Jun 14

Waynerooni says...

WFC should stay put and work with the council to get new leisure facilities built out there. If the council put some new houses on parts of the Marsh and the swimming pool land would help pay for that. Don't believe there aren't enough better sites for housing but it makes a good Echo headline
WFC should stay put and work with the council to get new leisure facilities built out there. If the council put some new houses on parts of the Marsh and the swimming pool land would help pay for that. Don't believe there aren't enough better sites for housing but it makes a good Echo headline Waynerooni
  • Score: -6

12:33pm Tue 17 Jun 14

elloello1980 says...

Waynerooni wrote:
WFC should stay put and work with the council to get new leisure facilities built out there. If the council put some new houses on parts of the Marsh and the swimming pool land would help pay for that. Don't believe there aren't enough better sites for housing but it makes a good Echo headline
how many people actually go to see WFC? far less than those that use the Marsh.

The best solution on this thread is sharing with Weymouth Rugby Club. seems ideal to me. but the over-ambitious WFC fans will probably feel it's not good enough for their team...
[quote][p][bold]Waynerooni[/bold] wrote: WFC should stay put and work with the council to get new leisure facilities built out there. If the council put some new houses on parts of the Marsh and the swimming pool land would help pay for that. Don't believe there aren't enough better sites for housing but it makes a good Echo headline[/p][/quote]how many people actually go to see WFC? far less than those that use the Marsh. The best solution on this thread is sharing with Weymouth Rugby Club. seems ideal to me. but the over-ambitious WFC fans will probably feel it's not good enough for their team... elloello1980
  • Score: 2

12:40pm Tue 17 Jun 14

PHonnor says...

elloello1980 wrote:
Waynerooni wrote: WFC should stay put and work with the council to get new leisure facilities built out there. If the council put some new houses on parts of the Marsh and the swimming pool land would help pay for that. Don't believe there aren't enough better sites for housing but it makes a good Echo headline
how many people actually go to see WFC? far less than those that use the Marsh. The best solution on this thread is sharing with Weymouth Rugby Club. seems ideal to me. but the over-ambitious WFC fans will probably feel it's not good enough for their team...
Its not the over ambitious WFC fans driving this, its the ex chairman who happens to be the property developer behind the drive to build houses at the BLS, and if he wants to do this then an alternative site needs to be found, and I believe W&PRC have already given him the finger anyway.
[quote][p][bold]elloello1980[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Waynerooni[/bold] wrote: WFC should stay put and work with the council to get new leisure facilities built out there. If the council put some new houses on parts of the Marsh and the swimming pool land would help pay for that. Don't believe there aren't enough better sites for housing but it makes a good Echo headline[/p][/quote]how many people actually go to see WFC? far less than those that use the Marsh. The best solution on this thread is sharing with Weymouth Rugby Club. seems ideal to me. but the over-ambitious WFC fans will probably feel it's not good enough for their team...[/p][/quote]Its not the over ambitious WFC fans driving this, its the ex chairman who happens to be the property developer behind the drive to build houses at the BLS, and if he wants to do this then an alternative site needs to be found, and I believe W&PRC have already given him the finger anyway. PHonnor
  • Score: 5

12:47pm Tue 17 Jun 14

codlips says...

JamesYoung wrote:
We don't need more homes.
The ratio of bedrooms to people is higher than it has ever been.
There are over a million empty homes across the country.
Across the country, rents are rising at less than the rate of inflation. If we needed more homes, demand for rented homes would be rising in line with house prices.
This is all a government driven ponzi scheme. House prices fell after 2008, even though the population continued to rise. Why? Because the banks stopped lending.
Now, encouraged by billions of pounds of printed money, the banks are lending stupid amounts again.
Does anybody seriously think that developers will ask less for new homes, which they should if supply is increasing? No.
My prediction is that within 2-3 years we'll have a property crash that will trap the feckless in negative equity and will return house prices to where they historically should be.
Your point is very valid and well put, however, south Dorset is a desirable place to move too so more houses may well be needed down here (not that i want them), and the population of Weymouth and Portland grows year on year according to the D.C.C website.
[quote][p][bold]JamesYoung[/bold] wrote: We don't need more homes. The ratio of bedrooms to people is higher than it has ever been. There are over a million empty homes across the country. Across the country, rents are rising at less than the rate of inflation. If we needed more homes, demand for rented homes would be rising in line with house prices. This is all a government driven ponzi scheme. House prices fell after 2008, even though the population continued to rise. Why? Because the banks stopped lending. Now, encouraged by billions of pounds of printed money, the banks are lending stupid amounts again. Does anybody seriously think that developers will ask less for new homes, which they should if supply is increasing? No. My prediction is that within 2-3 years we'll have a property crash that will trap the feckless in negative equity and will return house prices to where they historically should be.[/p][/quote]Your point is very valid and well put, however, south Dorset is a desirable place to move too so more houses may well be needed down here (not that i want them), and the population of Weymouth and Portland grows year on year according to the D.C.C website. codlips
  • Score: 3

12:49pm Tue 17 Jun 14

Brian.H says...

WFC could play at the Marsh, just rope a pitch off.

it will be avery sad day if the council allow a stadium or housing to be build on the Marsh.
WFC could play at the Marsh, just rope a pitch off. it will be avery sad day if the council allow a stadium or housing to be build on the Marsh. Brian.H
  • Score: 5

12:55pm Tue 17 Jun 14

marabout says...

There are 164 homeless people in Weymouth and there are 1226 people on the housing waiting list


The average attendance at Weymouth is somewhere in the region of 650.
There are 164 homeless people in Weymouth and there are 1226 people on the housing waiting list The average attendance at Weymouth is somewhere in the region of 650. marabout
  • Score: 1

1:20pm Tue 17 Jun 14

OpenEye says...

Surely the biggest issue against building there is the fact that there's a football ground in the middle of the proposed area that Wessex Delivery LLP don't own....until that matter is resolved this argument isn't even relevant
Surely the biggest issue against building there is the fact that there's a football ground in the middle of the proposed area that Wessex Delivery LLP don't own....until that matter is resolved this argument isn't even relevant OpenEye
  • Score: 4

1:21pm Tue 17 Jun 14

PHonnor says...

codlips wrote:
JamesYoung wrote: We don't need more homes. The ratio of bedrooms to people is higher than it has ever been. There are over a million empty homes across the country. Across the country, rents are rising at less than the rate of inflation. If we needed more homes, demand for rented homes would be rising in line with house prices. This is all a government driven ponzi scheme. House prices fell after 2008, even though the population continued to rise. Why? Because the banks stopped lending. Now, encouraged by billions of pounds of printed money, the banks are lending stupid amounts again. Does anybody seriously think that developers will ask less for new homes, which they should if supply is increasing? No. My prediction is that within 2-3 years we'll have a property crash that will trap the feckless in negative equity and will return house prices to where they historically should be.
Your point is very valid and well put, however, south Dorset is a desirable place to move too so more houses may well be needed down here (not that i want them), and the population of Weymouth and Portland grows year on year according to the D.C.C website.
The problem being is W&P is running out of room and one of the reasons people want to move here is because its nice, building an excessive amount of houses wont keep it that way.
[quote][p][bold]codlips[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]JamesYoung[/bold] wrote: We don't need more homes. The ratio of bedrooms to people is higher than it has ever been. There are over a million empty homes across the country. Across the country, rents are rising at less than the rate of inflation. If we needed more homes, demand for rented homes would be rising in line with house prices. This is all a government driven ponzi scheme. House prices fell after 2008, even though the population continued to rise. Why? Because the banks stopped lending. Now, encouraged by billions of pounds of printed money, the banks are lending stupid amounts again. Does anybody seriously think that developers will ask less for new homes, which they should if supply is increasing? No. My prediction is that within 2-3 years we'll have a property crash that will trap the feckless in negative equity and will return house prices to where they historically should be.[/p][/quote]Your point is very valid and well put, however, south Dorset is a desirable place to move too so more houses may well be needed down here (not that i want them), and the population of Weymouth and Portland grows year on year according to the D.C.C website.[/p][/quote]The problem being is W&P is running out of room and one of the reasons people want to move here is because its nice, building an excessive amount of houses wont keep it that way. PHonnor
  • Score: 5

1:27pm Tue 17 Jun 14

cosmick says...

People move here because they are being driven out of the areas where they were born and brought up,
People move here because they are being driven out of the areas where they were born and brought up, cosmick
  • Score: 6

2:58pm Tue 17 Jun 14

codlips says...

PHonnor wrote:
codlips wrote:
JamesYoung wrote: We don't need more homes. The ratio of bedrooms to people is higher than it has ever been. There are over a million empty homes across the country. Across the country, rents are rising at less than the rate of inflation. If we needed more homes, demand for rented homes would be rising in line with house prices. This is all a government driven ponzi scheme. House prices fell after 2008, even though the population continued to rise. Why? Because the banks stopped lending. Now, encouraged by billions of pounds of printed money, the banks are lending stupid amounts again. Does anybody seriously think that developers will ask less for new homes, which they should if supply is increasing? No. My prediction is that within 2-3 years we'll have a property crash that will trap the feckless in negative equity and will return house prices to where they historically should be.
Your point is very valid and well put, however, south Dorset is a desirable place to move too so more houses may well be needed down here (not that i want them), and the population of Weymouth and Portland grows year on year according to the D.C.C website.
The problem being is W&P is running out of room and one of the reasons people want to move here is because its nice, building an excessive amount of houses wont keep it that way.
Agreed.
[quote][p][bold]PHonnor[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]codlips[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]JamesYoung[/bold] wrote: We don't need more homes. The ratio of bedrooms to people is higher than it has ever been. There are over a million empty homes across the country. Across the country, rents are rising at less than the rate of inflation. If we needed more homes, demand for rented homes would be rising in line with house prices. This is all a government driven ponzi scheme. House prices fell after 2008, even though the population continued to rise. Why? Because the banks stopped lending. Now, encouraged by billions of pounds of printed money, the banks are lending stupid amounts again. Does anybody seriously think that developers will ask less for new homes, which they should if supply is increasing? No. My prediction is that within 2-3 years we'll have a property crash that will trap the feckless in negative equity and will return house prices to where they historically should be.[/p][/quote]Your point is very valid and well put, however, south Dorset is a desirable place to move too so more houses may well be needed down here (not that i want them), and the population of Weymouth and Portland grows year on year according to the D.C.C website.[/p][/quote]The problem being is W&P is running out of room and one of the reasons people want to move here is because its nice, building an excessive amount of houses wont keep it that way.[/p][/quote]Agreed. codlips
  • Score: 2

5:50pm Tue 17 Jun 14

annotater says...

Call any place paradise, kiss it good bye.
Call any place paradise, kiss it good bye. annotater
  • Score: 2

6:12pm Tue 17 Jun 14

JACKC says...

Presumably then, if these houses get the go ahead (which seems to have been decided already!) we won't need all those proposed by Stewkesbury on the Town Green?
Presumably then, if these houses get the go ahead (which seems to have been decided already!) we won't need all those proposed by Stewkesbury on the Town Green? JACKC
  • Score: 2

7:25pm Tue 17 Jun 14

westbaywonder says...

cosmick wrote:
People move here because they are being driven out of the areas where they were born and brought up,
Cosmick is totally correct with this statement.
This has been going on since the late 70,s and is still going on today, but the cause of this is still being encouraged.
When there is no more space on this tiny island and its becomes impossible to find a true piece of England then civil war will erupt.
This has been on the cards for years and is sure to happen within the next 50-100.
[quote][p][bold]cosmick[/bold] wrote: People move here because they are being driven out of the areas where they were born and brought up,[/p][/quote]Cosmick is totally correct with this statement. This has been going on since the late 70,s and is still going on today, but the cause of this is still being encouraged. When there is no more space on this tiny island and its becomes impossible to find a true piece of England then civil war will erupt. This has been on the cards for years and is sure to happen within the next 50-100. westbaywonder
  • Score: 2

8:41pm Tue 17 Jun 14

JamesYoung says...

westbaywonder wrote:
cosmick wrote:
People move here because they are being driven out of the areas where they were born and brought up,
Cosmick is totally correct with this statement.
This has been going on since the late 70,s and is still going on today, but the cause of this is still being encouraged.
When there is no more space on this tiny island and its becomes impossible to find a true piece of England then civil war will erupt.
This has been on the cards for years and is sure to happen within the next 50-100.
Not just this. I'm Dorset born, but at the moment i am working in London due to lack of work down here. There's barely a week goes by without the London Evening Standard featuring an article about idyllic Dorset villages with houses to buy. It makes me bloody angry.
[quote][p][bold]westbaywonder[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cosmick[/bold] wrote: People move here because they are being driven out of the areas where they were born and brought up,[/p][/quote]Cosmick is totally correct with this statement. This has been going on since the late 70,s and is still going on today, but the cause of this is still being encouraged. When there is no more space on this tiny island and its becomes impossible to find a true piece of England then civil war will erupt. This has been on the cards for years and is sure to happen within the next 50-100.[/p][/quote]Not just this. I'm Dorset born, but at the moment i am working in London due to lack of work down here. There's barely a week goes by without the London Evening Standard featuring an article about idyllic Dorset villages with houses to buy. It makes me bloody angry. JamesYoung
  • Score: 6

9:14pm Tue 17 Jun 14

breamoreboy says...

JamesYoung wrote:
westbaywonder wrote:
cosmick wrote:
People move here because they are being driven out of the areas where they were born and brought up,
Cosmick is totally correct with this statement.
This has been going on since the late 70,s and is still going on today, but the cause of this is still being encouraged.
When there is no more space on this tiny island and its becomes impossible to find a true piece of England then civil war will erupt.
This has been on the cards for years and is sure to happen within the next 50-100.
Not just this. I'm Dorset born, but at the moment i am working in London due to lack of work down here. There's barely a week goes by without the London Evening Standard featuring an article about idyllic Dorset villages with houses to buy. It makes me bloody angry.
I was born just over the border, first photo, first floor, second window from the right, three families in three rented cottages http://tinyurl.com/q
d8dtvq
[quote][p][bold]JamesYoung[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]westbaywonder[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]cosmick[/bold] wrote: People move here because they are being driven out of the areas where they were born and brought up,[/p][/quote]Cosmick is totally correct with this statement. This has been going on since the late 70,s and is still going on today, but the cause of this is still being encouraged. When there is no more space on this tiny island and its becomes impossible to find a true piece of England then civil war will erupt. This has been on the cards for years and is sure to happen within the next 50-100.[/p][/quote]Not just this. I'm Dorset born, but at the moment i am working in London due to lack of work down here. There's barely a week goes by without the London Evening Standard featuring an article about idyllic Dorset villages with houses to buy. It makes me bloody angry.[/p][/quote]I was born just over the border, first photo, first floor, second window from the right, three families in three rented cottages http://tinyurl.com/q d8dtvq breamoreboy
  • Score: -2

9:35pm Tue 17 Jun 14

Mr Speedway says...

Ok! If the Weymouth Football club want to move out and sale up let them. Why don't the owner go to see if any speedway person want to buy the stadium off them. That be good, So we the speedway fans will have their sport of speedway back & the speedway back at Weymouth again. So come on! PLEASE HELP! Weymouth council NO TO HOUSE AND YES TO OUR SPEEDWAY AGAIN. KEEP THE STADIUM OPEN FOR SPEEDWAY & IF SO FOOTBALL ONCE & FOR ALL.
Ok! If the Weymouth Football club want to move out and sale up let them. Why don't the owner go to see if any speedway person want to buy the stadium off them. That be good, So we the speedway fans will have their sport of speedway back & the speedway back at Weymouth again. So come on! PLEASE HELP! Weymouth council NO TO HOUSE AND YES TO OUR SPEEDWAY AGAIN. KEEP THE STADIUM OPEN FOR SPEEDWAY & IF SO FOOTBALL ONCE & FOR ALL. Mr Speedway
  • Score: -3

6:42am Wed 18 Jun 14

MrTomSmith says...

marabout wrote:
There are 164 homeless people in Weymouth and there are 1226 people on the housing waiting list


The average attendance at Weymouth is somewhere in the region of 650.
So? What's your point. There could be a million people homeless and average attendance of 1 and the situation would still be the same.
To build on someone's land you need to either A) Own it, or B) Lease it.
The builders don't own the Stadium, end of story. Whatever plan is agreed, the Club still have to agree to move. This whole story has NOTHING to do with how many people watch the Football, none whatsoever. It never will have. Its about ownership of the land, and suitability of the land. Nothing else.
[quote][p][bold]marabout[/bold] wrote: There are 164 homeless people in Weymouth and there are 1226 people on the housing waiting list The average attendance at Weymouth is somewhere in the region of 650.[/p][/quote]So? What's your point. There could be a million people homeless and average attendance of 1 and the situation would still be the same. To build on someone's land you need to either A) Own it, or B) Lease it. The builders don't own the Stadium, end of story. Whatever plan is agreed, the Club still have to agree to move. This whole story has NOTHING to do with how many people watch the Football, none whatsoever. It never will have. Its about ownership of the land, and suitability of the land. Nothing else. MrTomSmith
  • Score: 1

9:53am Wed 18 Jun 14

jjlad2 says...

MrTomSmith wrote:
marabout wrote: There are 164 homeless people in Weymouth and there are 1226 people on the housing waiting list The average attendance at Weymouth is somewhere in the region of 650.
So? What's your point. There could be a million people homeless and average attendance of 1 and the situation would still be the same. To build on someone's land you need to either A) Own it, or B) Lease it. The builders don't own the Stadium, end of story. Whatever plan is agreed, the Club still have to agree to move. This whole story has NOTHING to do with how many people watch the Football, none whatsoever. It never will have. Its about ownership of the land, and suitability of the land. Nothing else.
Dont worry, as soon as planning permission is given, your football club will be sold by its present board, they will tell you its a good deal which will be better for the club, a smaller club will be built in line with our standard of football and attendance figures. Weymouth have not and will not have the finacial clout to buy quality players for at least 10yrs, money is not worth investing in Weymouth until they are back into a decent league at least.

Its a vicious circle i'm afraid, one that will see Weymouth, like many small town clubs struggle. do the right thing and join forces with the Rugby, Cricket Club and have one big complex, either the Rugby area or Redlands, both can accommadate all three sports.
[quote][p][bold]MrTomSmith[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]marabout[/bold] wrote: There are 164 homeless people in Weymouth and there are 1226 people on the housing waiting list The average attendance at Weymouth is somewhere in the region of 650.[/p][/quote]So? What's your point. There could be a million people homeless and average attendance of 1 and the situation would still be the same. To build on someone's land you need to either A) Own it, or B) Lease it. The builders don't own the Stadium, end of story. Whatever plan is agreed, the Club still have to agree to move. This whole story has NOTHING to do with how many people watch the Football, none whatsoever. It never will have. Its about ownership of the land, and suitability of the land. Nothing else.[/p][/quote]Dont worry, as soon as planning permission is given, your football club will be sold by its present board, they will tell you its a good deal which will be better for the club, a smaller club will be built in line with our standard of football and attendance figures. Weymouth have not and will not have the finacial clout to buy quality players for at least 10yrs, money is not worth investing in Weymouth until they are back into a decent league at least. Its a vicious circle i'm afraid, one that will see Weymouth, like many small town clubs struggle. do the right thing and join forces with the Rugby, Cricket Club and have one big complex, either the Rugby area or Redlands, both can accommadate all three sports. jjlad2
  • Score: 3

12:15pm Wed 18 Jun 14

Caption Sensible says...

marabout wrote:
There are 164 homeless people in Weymouth and there are 1226 people on the housing waiting list The average attendance at Weymouth is somewhere in the region of 650.
Your figures are wrong, there are over 4,000 people on the housing waiting list.

Also the official population figure for the area is suppressed downwards. The real population figure of the borough is nearer to 72,000 instead of the 'official' figure of 65,100.
[quote][p][bold]marabout[/bold] wrote: There are 164 homeless people in Weymouth and there are 1226 people on the housing waiting list The average attendance at Weymouth is somewhere in the region of 650.[/p][/quote]Your figures are wrong, there are over 4,000 people on the housing waiting list. Also the official population figure for the area is suppressed downwards. The real population figure of the borough is nearer to 72,000 instead of the 'official' figure of 65,100. Caption Sensible
  • Score: 3

8:46am Thu 19 Jun 14

schadwick says...

Hey! don't worry Weymouth can always use Portland as a dumping ground for more houses nothing creative just the usual plastered tenement types of hovels
strewn all over the island - which is over developed and loosing its raw beauty
Hey! don't worry Weymouth can always use Portland as a dumping ground for more houses nothing creative just the usual plastered tenement types of hovels strewn all over the island - which is over developed and loosing its raw beauty schadwick
  • Score: 0

1:58pm Thu 19 Jun 14

JamesYoung says...

Caption Sensible wrote:
marabout wrote:
There are 164 homeless people in Weymouth and there are 1226 people on the housing waiting list The average attendance at Weymouth is somewhere in the region of 650.
Your figures are wrong, there are over 4,000 people on the housing waiting list.

Also the official population figure for the area is suppressed downwards. The real population figure of the borough is nearer to 72,000 instead of the 'official' figure of 65,100.
Just out of interest (not disputing it), how do you know the real number is so much higher?
[quote][p][bold]Caption Sensible[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]marabout[/bold] wrote: There are 164 homeless people in Weymouth and there are 1226 people on the housing waiting list The average attendance at Weymouth is somewhere in the region of 650.[/p][/quote]Your figures are wrong, there are over 4,000 people on the housing waiting list. Also the official population figure for the area is suppressed downwards. The real population figure of the borough is nearer to 72,000 instead of the 'official' figure of 65,100.[/p][/quote]Just out of interest (not disputing it), how do you know the real number is so much higher? JamesYoung
  • Score: 1

3:23pm Sat 21 Jun 14

Caption Sensible says...

JamesYoung wrote:
Caption Sensible wrote:
marabout wrote:
There are 164 homeless people in Weymouth and there are 1226 people on the housing waiting list The average attendance at Weymouth is somewhere in the region of 650.
Your figures are wrong, there are over 4,000 people on the housing waiting list.

Also the official population figure for the area is suppressed downwards. The real population figure of the borough is nearer to 72,000 instead of the 'official' figure of 65,100.
Just out of interest (not disputing it), how do you know the real number is so much higher?
It is very simple and this has been pointed out to the ONS, W&PBC, DCC and the Echo. All ignored the information provided.

There are 31,346 dwellings in the borough..

By using the Office for National Statistics reckoning, the average number of occupants per dwelling is: 2.3 persons.

For Weymouth in 2011, this would suggest a population figure of: 25,648 x 2.3 = 58,990

For Portland in 2011, this would suggest a population figure of: 5,698 x 2.3 = 13,105

For the Borough in total, this would suggest a population figure of: 31,346 x 2.3 = 72,095

All of this information was deduced from official ONS, Dorset County Council information. Some 7,000 souls have gone missing - why?
[quote][p][bold]JamesYoung[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Caption Sensible[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]marabout[/bold] wrote: There are 164 homeless people in Weymouth and there are 1226 people on the housing waiting list The average attendance at Weymouth is somewhere in the region of 650.[/p][/quote]Your figures are wrong, there are over 4,000 people on the housing waiting list. Also the official population figure for the area is suppressed downwards. The real population figure of the borough is nearer to 72,000 instead of the 'official' figure of 65,100.[/p][/quote]Just out of interest (not disputing it), how do you know the real number is so much higher?[/p][/quote]It is very simple and this has been pointed out to the ONS, W&PBC, DCC and the Echo. All ignored the information provided. There are 31,346 dwellings in the borough.. By using the Office for National Statistics reckoning, the average number of occupants per dwelling is: 2.3 persons. For Weymouth in 2011, this would suggest a population figure of: 25,648 x 2.3 = 58,990 For Portland in 2011, this would suggest a population figure of: 5,698 x 2.3 = 13,105 For the Borough in total, this would suggest a population figure of: 31,346 x 2.3 = 72,095 All of this information was deduced from official ONS, Dorset County Council information. Some 7,000 souls have gone missing - why? Caption Sensible
  • Score: 3

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