Gas holder set to be demolished

DERELICT: Gas holder to be demolished

DERELICT: Gas holder to be demolished

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WEYMOUTH’s eyesore gas holder is finally set to be demolished amid plans to clear redundant buildings near the inner harbour for redevelopment.

The derelict electricity switching station nearby is also set to come down as part of a separate plan to build houses on the land.

The landmark gas holder, or gasometer, off Westwey Road dates from the 1950s and is the last of three to be cleared from the old gasworks site. Such structures are no longer required due to developments in gas pipe technology.

It has long been the vision of Weymouth and Portland Borough Council to see the site redeveloped for housing and site owners have previously said the land would be sold for appropriate uses.

But what happens there is in the hands of Southern Gas Networks (SGN).

For now, the company has only notified the council of its intention to demolish the redundant structure. Any development proposals will be the subject of a planning application.

No planning permission is needed to knock it down but SGN must tell the council how it will be demolished, said planning officer Chris Moscrop.

A SGN spokesman said: “Gas holders are no longer an efficient way to store gas.

“We have applied to demolish the holder but have not had a reply yet. “Until we get a response, we’re not in a position to comment further about the possible future use of the site.”

Transformation of the inner harbour began with the marina and harbourside housing. Now work is progressing to build retirement flats on the old fire station site and housing is envisaged for North Quay once council staff move out.

And a plan has now been lodged to build 25 homes at the former SEB depot between Westwey Road and Granville Road. It would see the demolition of the former switchgear building.

The borough’s retired planning chief Richard Burgess, now a planning consultant, said he regarded the gas holder’s presence as ‘unfinished business’ as the site had been allocated for housing in the local plan for many years.

He said: “At the time the site operators said the gas holder still had life in it and it wouldn’t be removed unless alternative gas storage was provided or it came to the end of its life. Presumably that has now happened.”

Weymouth resident Mike Kelly, another former planning official, said he would be pleased to see it go. He said: “I’m a fan of listed and historic buildings but not this.

“With the housing plan on the old electricity site alongside this it’s a step in the right direction at long last to getting Westwey Road sorted out.”

County councillor for Westham David Harris said: “The gas holder is an eyesore that spoils the beautiful views of our harbour.

“The only problem is that it’s going to be quite difficult to build on because the land will be polluted, so it is important this is considered.

“It would be good to see an indoor facility built in Weymouth, but that would ideally be on the other side of the harbour.”

  •  What do you think? E-mail us at letters@dorsetecho.co.uk

SEPARATE to the gas holder site, Landmark Estates has submitted a planning application to the borough council for a new residential development at the former electricity depot, now vacant and derelict.

Planning consultant Phil Holdcroft of Savills, acting for Landmark Estates said: “The scheme proposes 25 dwellings, comprising a mix of family town-house style dwellings with gardens and apartments overlooking the marina. Landmark Estates has made a commitment to meet the council’s requirements for 40 per cent of the homes to be affordable.

“A carefully considered design and layout enhances the areas established identity. It will provide new pedestrian links between Westwey Road and Granville and Stavordale Roads.

“We believe this traditional inspired design will be a real asset to Westham and have been delighted to assist Landmark Estates in redeveloping this vacant and previously developed parcel of land.”

 

Comments (56)

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7:05am Sat 5 Jul 14

cosmick says...

Be good to see the back of that old tank. Lets hope the houses to be built there are in keeping with the Harbour Area.
Be good to see the back of that old tank. Lets hope the houses to be built there are in keeping with the Harbour Area. cosmick
  • Score: 21

7:14am Sat 5 Jul 14

ronfogg says...

Good riddance, although I have a certain nostalgia for the old "Gas works end" at the Rec. Who now remembers the Bob Lord Trophy final second leg against Enfield? Those were the days.
Good riddance, although I have a certain nostalgia for the old "Gas works end" at the Rec. Who now remembers the Bob Lord Trophy final second leg against Enfield? Those were the days. ronfogg
  • Score: 14

7:47am Sat 5 Jul 14

arlbergbahn says...

Great, Council offices next please?
Great, Council offices next please? arlbergbahn
  • Score: 18

8:13am Sat 5 Jul 14

average_kinda_guy says...

It will be good to see the back of that rusting hulk. I hope that the buildings that replace it are in keeping with nothing around it and are designed with some modern, stylish, progressive and radical thinking. This has to be better than just some other lump that blends in with all of the anonymous style - free stacks of bricks that this town is too often cursed with and has got used to.
It will be good to see the back of that rusting hulk. I hope that the buildings that replace it are in keeping with nothing around it and are designed with some modern, stylish, progressive and radical thinking. This has to be better than just some other lump that blends in with all of the anonymous style - free stacks of bricks that this town is too often cursed with and has got used to. average_kinda_guy
  • Score: 24

9:30am Sat 5 Jul 14

connie68 says...

About bloody time too it's been an eyesore for years!!!
About bloody time too it's been an eyesore for years!!! connie68
  • Score: 11

9:38am Sat 5 Jul 14

annotater says...

I smell a small fortune being trousered here by some one.
I smell a small fortune being trousered here by some one. annotater
  • Score: 1

10:37am Sat 5 Jul 14

rjimmer says...

Why houses? There should be a ***** hotel somewhere on the Harbourside. The Council Offices site would be the most appropriate.
Why houses? There should be a ***** hotel somewhere on the Harbourside. The Council Offices site would be the most appropriate. rjimmer
  • Score: 14

10:49am Sat 5 Jul 14

Lanedor says...

Hope they also demolish the Bail and Probation Hostel - that takes up a prime site and who would want that near to housing.
Hope they also demolish the Bail and Probation Hostel - that takes up a prime site and who would want that near to housing. Lanedor
  • Score: 28

11:06am Sat 5 Jul 14

Giblet says...

More retirement flats - just what Weymouth needs!
More retirement flats - just what Weymouth needs! Giblet
  • Score: 13

11:17am Sat 5 Jul 14

codlips says...

Why housing in such a good location, something for the community would be much more appealing, a sports complex, pool, even a nice hotel etc. More housing on the harbour side is not needed and will be expensive in such a location.Lets have something we can all use.
Why housing in such a good location, something for the community would be much more appealing, a sports complex, pool, even a nice hotel etc. More housing on the harbour side is not needed and will be expensive in such a location.Lets have something we can all use. codlips
  • Score: 32

11:52am Sat 5 Jul 14

JamesYoung says...

There's an opportunity here. Most/all of the land is owned by utilities or the council. Raze it, move the road back from the harbour wall, and develop a mixed used bar/retail/flats in its place.
Sadly i suspect they'll just chuck in as many undersized and overpriced homes as they can. After all, more supply means lower prices, which is what the government claims to want.
There's an opportunity here. Most/all of the land is owned by utilities or the council. Raze it, move the road back from the harbour wall, and develop a mixed used bar/retail/flats in its place. Sadly i suspect they'll just chuck in as many undersized and overpriced homes as they can. After all, more supply means lower prices, which is what the government claims to want. JamesYoung
  • Score: 25

11:56am Sat 5 Jul 14

Caption Sensible says...

Use it as an opportunity to create an inner-harbour esplanade by moving Westway Road back.
Use it as an opportunity to create an inner-harbour esplanade by moving Westway Road back. Caption Sensible
  • Score: 20

12:00pm Sat 5 Jul 14

monkeydog says...

JamesYoung wrote:
There's an opportunity here. Most/all of the land is owned by utilities or the council. Raze it, move the road back from the harbour wall, and develop a mixed used bar/retail/flats in its place.
Sadly i suspect they'll just chuck in as many undersized and overpriced homes as they can. After all, more supply means lower prices, which is what the government claims to want.
A very good opportunity to start to make amends for poor planning in the past and develop a long-term plan allowing Weymouth to capitalize on the potential for the area around the marina. As you say, we'll probably end up with the unimaginative option.
[quote][p][bold]JamesYoung[/bold] wrote: There's an opportunity here. Most/all of the land is owned by utilities or the council. Raze it, move the road back from the harbour wall, and develop a mixed used bar/retail/flats in its place. Sadly i suspect they'll just chuck in as many undersized and overpriced homes as they can. After all, more supply means lower prices, which is what the government claims to want.[/p][/quote]A very good opportunity to start to make amends for poor planning in the past and develop a long-term plan allowing Weymouth to capitalize on the potential for the area around the marina. As you say, we'll probably end up with the unimaginative option. monkeydog
  • Score: 16

12:10pm Sat 5 Jul 14

R950 says...

From the comments here it seems everyone wants to get rid of the gasholder. Typical of Weymouth - no thoughts except ‘how much is the site worth and how much can we make out of the deal ?. For those with a modicum of forward thinking take a look at http://www.gasometer
.de/de/ where a redundant gasholder in Oberhausaen, Germany was converted into a fabulous modern structure with a much sought after myriad of uses for the entrepreneur developer who was brave enough to take it on. In Weymouth, once the envy of South Coast resorts – no chance. The powers that be could never aspire to such an advanced level of thinking.
From the comments here it seems everyone wants to get rid of the gasholder. Typical of Weymouth - no thoughts except ‘how much is the site worth and how much can we make out of the deal ?. For those with a modicum of forward thinking take a look at http://www.gasometer .de/de/ where a redundant gasholder in Oberhausaen, Germany was converted into a fabulous modern structure with a much sought after myriad of uses for the entrepreneur developer who was brave enough to take it on. In Weymouth, once the envy of South Coast resorts – no chance. The powers that be could never aspire to such an advanced level of thinking. R950
  • Score: 8

12:10pm Sat 5 Jul 14

radiator says...

codlips wrote:
Why housing in such a good location, something for the community would be much more appealing, a sports complex, pool, even a nice hotel etc. More housing on the harbour side is not needed and will be expensive in such a location.Lets have something we can all use.
Absolutely agree with you on this one, I have been saying this for years that a multiplex should have been built along there such as the one found in Jersey for instance.The trouble is that a developer would get a faster return on a housing development, whatever is built I hope its a bit more in keeping than the Asda Heights flats that grace the harbourside.
[quote][p][bold]codlips[/bold] wrote: Why housing in such a good location, something for the community would be much more appealing, a sports complex, pool, even a nice hotel etc. More housing on the harbour side is not needed and will be expensive in such a location.Lets have something we can all use.[/p][/quote]Absolutely agree with you on this one, I have been saying this for years that a multiplex should have been built along there such as the one found in Jersey for instance.The trouble is that a developer would get a faster return on a housing development, whatever is built I hope its a bit more in keeping than the Asda Heights flats that grace the harbourside. radiator
  • Score: 7

1:03pm Sat 5 Jul 14

Chav_Scum says...

I hear that, like the Land Registry building at the Granby, the Westwey House Job Centre building is incredibly under populated. Next door, the Court house is as much of an architectural eyesore on the harbourside as the current WP Council building is. Both buildings are only slightly less hideous than the eyesore messy junction which they neighbour. I take it Asda, despite their redevelopment, would still wish to move if given the opportunity. As stated above, the hostel really needs to go too. We have the Weymouth FC site up in the air, with the club being done over & looking for a new home, and a swimming pool that could ideally do with redeveloping as an all year round community centre & tourist attraction. A fabulous harbourside could be created to bring in the type of visitors our town wants & needs. PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE council can we get a forward thinking & COMPLETE plan of action on the whole site? This is a major opportunity to revamp the heart of our town, the idea to move the road back is brilliant, but all this needs to be investigated and overseen by those who are not in it to line their own pockets!
I hear that, like the Land Registry building at the Granby, the Westwey House Job Centre building is incredibly under populated. Next door, the Court house is as much of an architectural eyesore on the harbourside as the current WP Council building is. Both buildings are only slightly less hideous than the eyesore messy junction which they neighbour. I take it Asda, despite their redevelopment, would still wish to move if given the opportunity. As stated above, the hostel really needs to go too. We have the Weymouth FC site up in the air, with the club being done over & looking for a new home, and a swimming pool that could ideally do with redeveloping as an all year round community centre & tourist attraction. A fabulous harbourside could be created to bring in the type of visitors our town wants & needs. PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE council can we get a forward thinking & COMPLETE plan of action on the whole site? This is a major opportunity to revamp the heart of our town, the idea to move the road back is brilliant, but all this needs to be investigated and overseen by those who are not in it to line their own pockets! Chav_Scum
  • Score: 28

1:12pm Sat 5 Jul 14

Chav_Scum says...

R950 wrote:
From the comments here it seems everyone wants to get rid of the gasholder. Typical of Weymouth - no thoughts except ‘how much is the site worth and how much can we make out of the deal ?. For those with a modicum of forward thinking take a look at http://www.gasometer

.de/de/ where a redundant gasholder in Oberhausaen, Germany was converted into a fabulous modern structure with a much sought after myriad of uses for the entrepreneur developer who was brave enough to take it on. In Weymouth, once the envy of South Coast resorts – no chance. The powers that be could never aspire to such an advanced level of thinking.
Thanks - I would never have known such a building could be created! I agree it is an amazing conversion and statement architecture such as this IMHO would be a real talking point. Though I think the laser lights had the same vision. The problem is, if you're going to put ideas like this into action, you have to do it 100% - unfortunately I think Weymouth often lacks that little 'extra' to pull it off!
[quote][p][bold]R950[/bold] wrote: From the comments here it seems everyone wants to get rid of the gasholder. Typical of Weymouth - no thoughts except ‘how much is the site worth and how much can we make out of the deal ?. For those with a modicum of forward thinking take a look at http://www.gasometer .de/de/ where a redundant gasholder in Oberhausaen, Germany was converted into a fabulous modern structure with a much sought after myriad of uses for the entrepreneur developer who was brave enough to take it on. In Weymouth, once the envy of South Coast resorts – no chance. The powers that be could never aspire to such an advanced level of thinking.[/p][/quote]Thanks - I would never have known such a building could be created! I agree it is an amazing conversion and statement architecture such as this IMHO would be a real talking point. Though I think the laser lights had the same vision. The problem is, if you're going to put ideas like this into action, you have to do it 100% - unfortunately I think Weymouth often lacks that little 'extra' to pull it off! Chav_Scum
  • Score: 13

4:24pm Sat 5 Jul 14

Crimbo says...

Beauty is definitely in the eye of the beholder here. I'd really hate to see the gasometer demolished; it's a beautiful object and with a bit of thought and planning (two things sadly lacking in Weymouth) it could be turned into a real attraction. To improve the inner harbour piecemeal is a total waste of resources. Someone has to sit down and PLAN - take a holistic view of what will be needed in Weymouth, not in the next ten or fifteen years, but in the next twenty, thirty, fifty years...
Beauty is definitely in the eye of the beholder here. I'd really hate to see the gasometer demolished; it's a beautiful object and with a bit of thought and planning (two things sadly lacking in Weymouth) it could be turned into a real attraction. To improve the inner harbour piecemeal is a total waste of resources. Someone has to sit down and PLAN - take a holistic view of what will be needed in Weymouth, not in the next ten or fifteen years, but in the next twenty, thirty, fifty years... Crimbo
  • Score: 3

7:21pm Sat 5 Jul 14

lawrenceweston says...

So pleased that so many people also want to see something new and exciting developed for the long term future and benefit of Weymouth. This is a golden opportunity and we should be banging on the council's doors to get them to listen. The town needs a progressive modern vision and the redevelopment of such a large area of prime real estate by the harbour is an opportunity not to be missed. Please listen to us!
So pleased that so many people also want to see something new and exciting developed for the long term future and benefit of Weymouth. This is a golden opportunity and we should be banging on the council's doors to get them to listen. The town needs a progressive modern vision and the redevelopment of such a large area of prime real estate by the harbour is an opportunity not to be missed. Please listen to us! lawrenceweston
  • Score: 7

7:46pm Sat 5 Jul 14

Leccy says...

JamesYoung wrote:
There's an opportunity here. Most/all of the land is owned by utilities or the council. Raze it, move the road back from the harbour wall, and develop a mixed used bar/retail/flats in its place.
Sadly i suspect they'll just chuck in as many undersized and overpriced homes as they can. After all, more supply means lower prices, which is what the government claims to want.
I beg to differ, the old Southern Electric site is mainly owned by a private development company. The site has still got an active Sub-station behind the red brick wall the road side which supplies the all of the main Weymouth and Wyke areas, this alone would cost many millions to move. Although not impossible it makes the site financially challenging.
[quote][p][bold]JamesYoung[/bold] wrote: There's an opportunity here. Most/all of the land is owned by utilities or the council. Raze it, move the road back from the harbour wall, and develop a mixed used bar/retail/flats in its place. Sadly i suspect they'll just chuck in as many undersized and overpriced homes as they can. After all, more supply means lower prices, which is what the government claims to want.[/p][/quote]I beg to differ, the old Southern Electric site is mainly owned by a private development company. The site has still got an active Sub-station behind the red brick wall the road side which supplies the all of the main Weymouth and Wyke areas, this alone would cost many millions to move. Although not impossible it makes the site financially challenging. Leccy
  • Score: 1

8:09pm Sat 5 Jul 14

JamesYoung says...

Leccy wrote:
JamesYoung wrote:
There's an opportunity here. Most/all of the land is owned by utilities or the council. Raze it, move the road back from the harbour wall, and develop a mixed used bar/retail/flats in its place.
Sadly i suspect they'll just chuck in as many undersized and overpriced homes as they can. After all, more supply means lower prices, which is what the government claims to want.
I beg to differ, the old Southern Electric site is mainly owned by a private development company. The site has still got an active Sub-station behind the red brick wall the road side which supplies the all of the main Weymouth and Wyke areas, this alone would cost many millions to move. Although not impossible it makes the site financially challenging.
You don't need to beg, old bean :-).
I didn't know about the substation, thanks. They'll certainly be desirable homes!
[quote][p][bold]Leccy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]JamesYoung[/bold] wrote: There's an opportunity here. Most/all of the land is owned by utilities or the council. Raze it, move the road back from the harbour wall, and develop a mixed used bar/retail/flats in its place. Sadly i suspect they'll just chuck in as many undersized and overpriced homes as they can. After all, more supply means lower prices, which is what the government claims to want.[/p][/quote]I beg to differ, the old Southern Electric site is mainly owned by a private development company. The site has still got an active Sub-station behind the red brick wall the road side which supplies the all of the main Weymouth and Wyke areas, this alone would cost many millions to move. Although not impossible it makes the site financially challenging.[/p][/quote]You don't need to beg, old bean :-). I didn't know about the substation, thanks. They'll certainly be desirable homes! JamesYoung
  • Score: 0

8:10pm Sat 5 Jul 14

Get a grip says...

Any new development in Weymouth follows Poundbury.

The new flats on the fire station and the development brief for the council offices are a prime example of this.


A compleat rethink of how Weymouth can make the most of its natural assets is needed.

However the problem is that this is not in place and they are at the mercy of developers.
Any new development in Weymouth follows Poundbury. The new flats on the fire station and the development brief for the council offices are a prime example of this. A compleat rethink of how Weymouth can make the most of its natural assets is needed. However the problem is that this is not in place and they are at the mercy of developers. Get a grip
  • Score: 3

8:12pm Sat 5 Jul 14

ksmain says...

Good - glad to see these eyesores go!!

But please - can we put something commercial useful to the town on the land and PLEASE NO MORE STUPID HOUSES OR FLATS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!
Good - glad to see these eyesores go!! But please - can we put something commercial useful to the town on the land and PLEASE NO MORE STUPID HOUSES OR FLATS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ! ksmain
  • Score: 2

8:17pm Sat 5 Jul 14

ksmain says...

Get a grip wrote:
Any new development in Weymouth follows Poundbury.

The new flats on the fire station and the development brief for the council offices are a prime example of this.


A compleat rethink of how Weymouth can make the most of its natural assets is needed.

However the problem is that this is not in place and they are at the mercy of developers.
More like we are at the mercy of an unbusinesslike and unimaginative Town Council!
[quote][p][bold]Get a grip[/bold] wrote: Any new development in Weymouth follows Poundbury. The new flats on the fire station and the development brief for the council offices are a prime example of this. A compleat rethink of how Weymouth can make the most of its natural assets is needed. However the problem is that this is not in place and they are at the mercy of developers.[/p][/quote]More like we are at the mercy of an unbusinesslike and unimaginative Town Council! ksmain
  • Score: 4

9:06pm Sat 5 Jul 14

weymouthfox says...

The powers that be could never aspire to such an advanced level of thinking."
So who is there on Weymouth council who is capable of thinking?
The powers that be could never aspire to such an advanced level of thinking." So who is there on Weymouth council who is capable of thinking? weymouthfox
  • Score: 4

6:51am Sun 6 Jul 14

mark@greenhill says...

The harbour side needs something BIG, a really modern, futuristic hotel, with restaurants, bars and lots of parking beneath it.
A mixture of a large 10 or 15 floor hotel with some high end apartments and restaurants will bring people over to that side of the harbour.
Do away with the social security office (complete waste of a prime site) and locate it along with the bail hostel and council offices outside of the town centre.
This town really doesn't need yet more low rise housing in prime locations, we need to use the assets of the harbour to attract big statement buildings to make a feature of the harbour and attract business and work.
The only housing that close to the water needs to be expensive apartments and definitely not cheap houses that will waste the land and opportunity to bring in more work.
The harbour side needs something BIG, a really modern, futuristic hotel, with restaurants, bars and lots of parking beneath it. A mixture of a large 10 or 15 floor hotel with some high end apartments and restaurants will bring people over to that side of the harbour. Do away with the social security office (complete waste of a prime site) and locate it along with the bail hostel and council offices outside of the town centre. This town really doesn't need yet more low rise housing in prime locations, we need to use the assets of the harbour to attract big statement buildings to make a feature of the harbour and attract business and work. The only housing that close to the water needs to be expensive apartments and definitely not cheap houses that will waste the land and opportunity to bring in more work. mark@greenhill
  • Score: 10

7:27am Sun 6 Jul 14

PHonnor says...

mark@greenhill wrote:
The harbour side needs something BIG, a really modern, futuristic hotel, with restaurants, bars and lots of parking beneath it.
A mixture of a large 10 or 15 floor hotel with some high end apartments and restaurants will bring people over to that side of the harbour.
Do away with the social security office (complete waste of a prime site) and locate it along with the bail hostel and council offices outside of the town centre.
This town really doesn't need yet more low rise housing in prime locations, we need to use the assets of the harbour to attract big statement buildings to make a feature of the harbour and attract business and work.
The only housing that close to the water needs to be expensive apartments and definitely not cheap houses that will waste the land and opportunity to bring in more work.
Exactly, expensive apartments locals can't afford,. Weymouth is crying out for a top end hotel, should go either here or where the council offices are to take advantage of the views. It's good to read so many comments from people offering their good ideas, council take note!
[quote][p][bold]mark@greenhill[/bold] wrote: The harbour side needs something BIG, a really modern, futuristic hotel, with restaurants, bars and lots of parking beneath it. A mixture of a large 10 or 15 floor hotel with some high end apartments and restaurants will bring people over to that side of the harbour. Do away with the social security office (complete waste of a prime site) and locate it along with the bail hostel and council offices outside of the town centre. This town really doesn't need yet more low rise housing in prime locations, we need to use the assets of the harbour to attract big statement buildings to make a feature of the harbour and attract business and work. The only housing that close to the water needs to be expensive apartments and definitely not cheap houses that will waste the land and opportunity to bring in more work.[/p][/quote]Exactly, expensive apartments locals can't afford,. Weymouth is crying out for a top end hotel, should go either here or where the council offices are to take advantage of the views. It's good to read so many comments from people offering their good ideas, council take note! PHonnor
  • Score: 5

7:32am Sun 6 Jul 14

Green.S says...

Of course it's worth noting that the site will be contaminated! And will cost a fortune to clean up.i suspect that just like the site of the previous tank, this one will remain empty for some time.
Of course it's worth noting that the site will be contaminated! And will cost a fortune to clean up.i suspect that just like the site of the previous tank, this one will remain empty for some time. Green.S
  • Score: 1

7:34am Sun 6 Jul 14

Green.S says...

weymouthfox wrote:
The powers that be could never aspire to such an advanced level of thinking."
So who is there on Weymouth council who is capable of thinking?
Why then do the people of Weymouth keep voting for them?
[quote][p][bold]weymouthfox[/bold] wrote: The powers that be could never aspire to such an advanced level of thinking." So who is there on Weymouth council who is capable of thinking?[/p][/quote]Why then do the people of Weymouth keep voting for them? Green.S
  • Score: 6

9:32am Sun 6 Jul 14

Get a grip says...

The council will never promote a new big hotel as they have a vested interest.

They own so many of the seafront hotels.

The council have clearly demonstrated that they are not capable of managing thier property assets so they should sell the lot
The council will never promote a new big hotel as they have a vested interest. They own so many of the seafront hotels. The council have clearly demonstrated that they are not capable of managing thier property assets so they should sell the lot Get a grip
  • Score: 0

10:13am Sun 6 Jul 14

iansedwell says...

This will free up much needed space for affordable housing.

Who am I kidding? This will free up more valuable space for yet more luxury executive eyesores, brim full of luxury executive flats, for luxury executives who bring nothing to the culture of the town or its economy.
This will free up much needed space for affordable housing. Who am I kidding? This will free up more valuable space for yet more luxury executive eyesores, brim full of luxury executive flats, for luxury executives who bring nothing to the culture of the town or its economy. iansedwell
  • Score: 5

10:21am Sun 6 Jul 14

WykeReg says...

A hotel and convention center would be a major boost to the local economy. However, attracting visitors on that scale to the town also depends on those things the Romans introduced to Britain which we seem to have forgotten how to build. I think they were called 'roads.'
A hotel and convention center would be a major boost to the local economy. However, attracting visitors on that scale to the town also depends on those things the Romans introduced to Britain which we seem to have forgotten how to build. I think they were called 'roads.' WykeReg
  • Score: 1

2:11pm Sun 6 Jul 14

iansedwell says...

WykeReg wrote:
A hotel and convention center would be a major boost to the local economy. However, attracting visitors on that scale to the town also depends on those things the Romans introduced to Britain which we seem to have forgotten how to build. I think they were called 'roads.'
And your road will go where?

By the way, roads in this country pre-dated the Romans by many hundreds and in some case thousands of years. Part of the A30 is one of the oldest roads in Europe. The term Ridgeway has pre-Roman origins. The road from Exeter to London, via Dorchester and Salisbury is a pre-Roman road that the Romans improved.
[quote][p][bold]WykeReg[/bold] wrote: A hotel and convention center would be a major boost to the local economy. However, attracting visitors on that scale to the town also depends on those things the Romans introduced to Britain which we seem to have forgotten how to build. I think they were called 'roads.'[/p][/quote]And your road will go where? By the way, roads in this country pre-dated the Romans by many hundreds and in some case thousands of years. Part of the A30 is one of the oldest roads in Europe. The term Ridgeway has pre-Roman origins. The road from Exeter to London, via Dorchester and Salisbury is a pre-Roman road that the Romans improved. iansedwell
  • Score: 5

2:18pm Sun 6 Jul 14

mark@greenhill says...

iansedwell wrote:
This will free up much needed space for affordable housing.

Who am I kidding? This will free up more valuable space for yet more luxury executive eyesores, brim full of luxury executive flats, for luxury executives who bring nothing to the culture of the town or its economy.
And affordable/subsidise
d housing brigs what exactly?
More single parents pushing buggies to ASDA.

Expensive apartments, bring people with disposable income.
Weymouth needs people with disposable income, not yet more social housing, which brings more people at the lower end of the pay scales, that cannot and will not support any of the restaurants, or better shops in this town.
Cheap housing will only benefit Poundland and Wetherspoons.
[quote][p][bold]iansedwell[/bold] wrote: This will free up much needed space for affordable housing. Who am I kidding? This will free up more valuable space for yet more luxury executive eyesores, brim full of luxury executive flats, for luxury executives who bring nothing to the culture of the town or its economy.[/p][/quote]And affordable/subsidise d housing brigs what exactly? More single parents pushing buggies to ASDA. Expensive apartments, bring people with disposable income. Weymouth needs people with disposable income, not yet more social housing, which brings more people at the lower end of the pay scales, that cannot and will not support any of the restaurants, or better shops in this town. Cheap housing will only benefit Poundland and Wetherspoons. mark@greenhill
  • Score: 8

2:20pm Sun 6 Jul 14

mark@greenhill says...

iansedwell wrote:
WykeReg wrote:
A hotel and convention center would be a major boost to the local economy. However, attracting visitors on that scale to the town also depends on those things the Romans introduced to Britain which we seem to have forgotten how to build. I think they were called 'roads.'
And your road will go where?

By the way, roads in this country pre-dated the Romans by many hundreds and in some case thousands of years. Part of the A30 is one of the oldest roads in Europe. The term Ridgeway has pre-Roman origins. The road from Exeter to London, via Dorchester and Salisbury is a pre-Roman road that the Romans improved.
I think the point being, that the M27 really should be extended at least as far as Bournemouth, and from there on the A31 /A30 should be dual carriageway all the way to Exeter.
[quote][p][bold]iansedwell[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]WykeReg[/bold] wrote: A hotel and convention center would be a major boost to the local economy. However, attracting visitors on that scale to the town also depends on those things the Romans introduced to Britain which we seem to have forgotten how to build. I think they were called 'roads.'[/p][/quote]And your road will go where? By the way, roads in this country pre-dated the Romans by many hundreds and in some case thousands of years. Part of the A30 is one of the oldest roads in Europe. The term Ridgeway has pre-Roman origins. The road from Exeter to London, via Dorchester and Salisbury is a pre-Roman road that the Romans improved.[/p][/quote]I think the point being, that the M27 really should be extended at least as far as Bournemouth, and from there on the A31 /A30 should be dual carriageway all the way to Exeter. mark@greenhill
  • Score: 8

3:16pm Sun 6 Jul 14

iansedwell says...

mark@greenhill wrote:
iansedwell wrote:
WykeReg wrote:
A hotel and convention center would be a major boost to the local economy. However, attracting visitors on that scale to the town also depends on those things the Romans introduced to Britain which we seem to have forgotten how to build. I think they were called 'roads.'
And your road will go where?

By the way, roads in this country pre-dated the Romans by many hundreds and in some case thousands of years. Part of the A30 is one of the oldest roads in Europe. The term Ridgeway has pre-Roman origins. The road from Exeter to London, via Dorchester and Salisbury is a pre-Roman road that the Romans improved.
I think the point being, that the M27 really should be extended at least as far as Bournemouth, and from there on the A31 /A30 should be dual carriageway all the way to Exeter.
I should've twigged :-)
[quote][p][bold]mark@greenhill[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]iansedwell[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]WykeReg[/bold] wrote: A hotel and convention center would be a major boost to the local economy. However, attracting visitors on that scale to the town also depends on those things the Romans introduced to Britain which we seem to have forgotten how to build. I think they were called 'roads.'[/p][/quote]And your road will go where? By the way, roads in this country pre-dated the Romans by many hundreds and in some case thousands of years. Part of the A30 is one of the oldest roads in Europe. The term Ridgeway has pre-Roman origins. The road from Exeter to London, via Dorchester and Salisbury is a pre-Roman road that the Romans improved.[/p][/quote]I think the point being, that the M27 really should be extended at least as far as Bournemouth, and from there on the A31 /A30 should be dual carriageway all the way to Exeter.[/p][/quote]I should've twigged :-) iansedwell
  • Score: 0

7:18pm Sun 6 Jul 14

codlips says...

mark@greenhill wrote:
iansedwell wrote:
WykeReg wrote:
A hotel and convention center would be a major boost to the local economy. However, attracting visitors on that scale to the town also depends on those things the Romans introduced to Britain which we seem to have forgotten how to build. I think they were called 'roads.'
And your road will go where?

By the way, roads in this country pre-dated the Romans by many hundreds and in some case thousands of years. Part of the A30 is one of the oldest roads in Europe. The term Ridgeway has pre-Roman origins. The road from Exeter to London, via Dorchester and Salisbury is a pre-Roman road that the Romans improved.
I think the point being, that the M27 really should be extended at least as far as Bournemouth, and from there on the A31 /A30 should be dual carriageway all the way to Exeter.
Too true.
[quote][p][bold]mark@greenhill[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]iansedwell[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]WykeReg[/bold] wrote: A hotel and convention center would be a major boost to the local economy. However, attracting visitors on that scale to the town also depends on those things the Romans introduced to Britain which we seem to have forgotten how to build. I think they were called 'roads.'[/p][/quote]And your road will go where? By the way, roads in this country pre-dated the Romans by many hundreds and in some case thousands of years. Part of the A30 is one of the oldest roads in Europe. The term Ridgeway has pre-Roman origins. The road from Exeter to London, via Dorchester and Salisbury is a pre-Roman road that the Romans improved.[/p][/quote]I think the point being, that the M27 really should be extended at least as far as Bournemouth, and from there on the A31 /A30 should be dual carriageway all the way to Exeter.[/p][/quote]Too true. codlips
  • Score: 4

8:27pm Sun 6 Jul 14

Isosceles says...

?
? Isosceles
  • Score: -1

12:05am Mon 7 Jul 14

Hippyhooker says...

Chav_Scum wrote:
I hear that, like the Land Registry building at the Granby, the Westwey House Job Centre building is incredibly under populated. Next door, the Court house is as much of an architectural eyesore on the harbourside as the current WP Council building is. Both buildings are only slightly less hideous than the eyesore messy junction which they neighbour. I take it Asda, despite their redevelopment, would still wish to move if given the opportunity. As stated above, the hostel really needs to go too. We have the Weymouth FC site up in the air, with the club being done over & looking for a new home, and a swimming pool that could ideally do with redeveloping as an all year round community centre & tourist attraction. A fabulous harbourside could be created to bring in the type of visitors our town wants & needs. PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE council can we get a forward thinking & COMPLETE plan of action on the whole site? This is a major opportunity to revamp the heart of our town, the idea to move the road back is brilliant, but all this needs to be investigated and overseen by those who are not in it to line their own pockets!
I didn't think it would be long until some idiot mentioned the Asda junction, were you one of the many that predicted there would be many deaths caused by it, and just how many accidents has there been there? ONE MINOR BUMP lol
[quote][p][bold]Chav_Scum[/bold] wrote: I hear that, like the Land Registry building at the Granby, the Westwey House Job Centre building is incredibly under populated. Next door, the Court house is as much of an architectural eyesore on the harbourside as the current WP Council building is. Both buildings are only slightly less hideous than the eyesore messy junction which they neighbour. I take it Asda, despite their redevelopment, would still wish to move if given the opportunity. As stated above, the hostel really needs to go too. We have the Weymouth FC site up in the air, with the club being done over & looking for a new home, and a swimming pool that could ideally do with redeveloping as an all year round community centre & tourist attraction. A fabulous harbourside could be created to bring in the type of visitors our town wants & needs. PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE council can we get a forward thinking & COMPLETE plan of action on the whole site? This is a major opportunity to revamp the heart of our town, the idea to move the road back is brilliant, but all this needs to be investigated and overseen by those who are not in it to line their own pockets![/p][/quote]I didn't think it would be long until some idiot mentioned the Asda junction, were you one of the many that predicted there would be many deaths caused by it, and just how many accidents has there been there? ONE MINOR BUMP lol Hippyhooker
  • Score: -3

8:39am Mon 7 Jul 14

MaidofDorset says...

It's a funny old world. Bridport council gave planning permission for a block of flats on the sea front at West Bay which look just like gas tanks , now Weymouth is to see the end of their own.

There is no need for the Jobcentre, bail hostel etc. to be on such a prime site. This is our one chance of developing the area into a nice attractive place. Lets get it right.
It's a funny old world. Bridport council gave planning permission for a block of flats on the sea front at West Bay which look just like gas tanks , now Weymouth is to see the end of their own. There is no need for the Jobcentre, bail hostel etc. to be on such a prime site. This is our one chance of developing the area into a nice attractive place. Lets get it right. MaidofDorset
  • Score: 6

11:04am Mon 7 Jul 14

JamesYoung says...

mark@greenhill wrote:
iansedwell wrote:
This will free up much needed space for affordable housing.

Who am I kidding? This will free up more valuable space for yet more luxury executive eyesores, brim full of luxury executive flats, for luxury executives who bring nothing to the culture of the town or its economy.
And affordable/subsidise

d housing brigs what exactly?
More single parents pushing buggies to ASDA.

Expensive apartments, bring people with disposable income.
Weymouth needs people with disposable income, not yet more social housing, which brings more people at the lower end of the pay scales, that cannot and will not support any of the restaurants, or better shops in this town.
Cheap housing will only benefit Poundland and Wetherspoons.
May i refer you to the following story from the Daily Mail, in which Karen Marton, charity trustee, aims to demonstrate her altruism by selling her poky 3 bed semi for a £1m profit, out of which she plans to buy a flat in London, and to displace a family from Dorset.
Nearly every week there is an article in the Evenin Sten'nart recommending Dorset as a great place to own a holiday home.
We should be very grateful for all this inward investment. Strangely, my comment on the Mail website was met with 6 red marks!

http://www.dailymail
.co.uk/news/article-
2681784/We-property-
million-Dont-live-Lo
ndon-Then-look-away-
home-owners-reveal-h
ousing-boom-fortunes
.html
[quote][p][bold]mark@greenhill[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]iansedwell[/bold] wrote: This will free up much needed space for affordable housing. Who am I kidding? This will free up more valuable space for yet more luxury executive eyesores, brim full of luxury executive flats, for luxury executives who bring nothing to the culture of the town or its economy.[/p][/quote]And affordable/subsidise d housing brigs what exactly? More single parents pushing buggies to ASDA. Expensive apartments, bring people with disposable income. Weymouth needs people with disposable income, not yet more social housing, which brings more people at the lower end of the pay scales, that cannot and will not support any of the restaurants, or better shops in this town. Cheap housing will only benefit Poundland and Wetherspoons.[/p][/quote]May i refer you to the following story from the Daily Mail, in which Karen Marton, charity trustee, aims to demonstrate her altruism by selling her poky 3 bed semi for a £1m profit, out of which she plans to buy a flat in London, and to displace a family from Dorset. Nearly every week there is an article in the Evenin Sten'nart recommending Dorset as a great place to own a holiday home. We should be very grateful for all this inward investment. Strangely, my comment on the Mail website was met with 6 red marks! http://www.dailymail .co.uk/news/article- 2681784/We-property- million-Dont-live-Lo ndon-Then-look-away- home-owners-reveal-h ousing-boom-fortunes .html JamesYoung
  • Score: -2

12:51pm Mon 7 Jul 14

codlips says...

Hippyhooker wrote:
Chav_Scum wrote:
I hear that, like the Land Registry building at the Granby, the Westwey House Job Centre building is incredibly under populated. Next door, the Court house is as much of an architectural eyesore on the harbourside as the current WP Council building is. Both buildings are only slightly less hideous than the eyesore messy junction which they neighbour. I take it Asda, despite their redevelopment, would still wish to move if given the opportunity. As stated above, the hostel really needs to go too. We have the Weymouth FC site up in the air, with the club being done over & looking for a new home, and a swimming pool that could ideally do with redeveloping as an all year round community centre & tourist attraction. A fabulous harbourside could be created to bring in the type of visitors our town wants & needs. PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE council can we get a forward thinking & COMPLETE plan of action on the whole site? This is a major opportunity to revamp the heart of our town, the idea to move the road back is brilliant, but all this needs to be investigated and overseen by those who are not in it to line their own pockets!
I didn't think it would be long until some idiot mentioned the Asda junction, were you one of the many that predicted there would be many deaths caused by it, and just how many accidents has there been there? ONE MINOR BUMP lol
Your obviously haven't seen the memorial to the young lad who was killed at the junction by Asda, I've seen a smash with my own eyes there too.Plus read of a couple in the echo, so who's the idiot?...or is it that your on acid hippy?
[quote][p][bold]Hippyhooker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Chav_Scum[/bold] wrote: I hear that, like the Land Registry building at the Granby, the Westwey House Job Centre building is incredibly under populated. Next door, the Court house is as much of an architectural eyesore on the harbourside as the current WP Council building is. Both buildings are only slightly less hideous than the eyesore messy junction which they neighbour. I take it Asda, despite their redevelopment, would still wish to move if given the opportunity. As stated above, the hostel really needs to go too. We have the Weymouth FC site up in the air, with the club being done over & looking for a new home, and a swimming pool that could ideally do with redeveloping as an all year round community centre & tourist attraction. A fabulous harbourside could be created to bring in the type of visitors our town wants & needs. PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE council can we get a forward thinking & COMPLETE plan of action on the whole site? This is a major opportunity to revamp the heart of our town, the idea to move the road back is brilliant, but all this needs to be investigated and overseen by those who are not in it to line their own pockets![/p][/quote]I didn't think it would be long until some idiot mentioned the Asda junction, were you one of the many that predicted there would be many deaths caused by it, and just how many accidents has there been there? ONE MINOR BUMP lol[/p][/quote]Your obviously haven't seen the memorial to the young lad who was killed at the junction by Asda, I've seen a smash with my own eyes there too.Plus read of a couple in the echo, so who's the idiot?...or is it that your on acid hippy? codlips
  • Score: 6

3:25pm Mon 7 Jul 14

Preston North End says...

In Weymouth & Portland, 2.6% of the houses are second homes. Contrast that to many areas of Cornwall, where it's 40%.

Weymouth may have problems, e.g. lack of fairy lights, but I'm not sure second home owners are a compelling target for negativity.
In Weymouth & Portland, 2.6% of the houses are second homes. Contrast that to many areas of Cornwall, where it's 40%. Weymouth may have problems, e.g. lack of fairy lights, but I'm not sure second home owners are a compelling target for negativity. Preston North End
  • Score: 0

5:53pm Mon 7 Jul 14

JamesYoung says...

Preston North End wrote:
In Weymouth & Portland, 2.6% of the houses are second homes. Contrast that to many areas of Cornwall, where it's 40%.

Weymouth may have problems, e.g. lack of fairy lights, but I'm not sure second home owners are a compelling target for negativity.
Quite. I mean, it's not like there are 2.6% more local families that are homeless as a consequence, is it?
[quote][p][bold]Preston North End[/bold] wrote: In Weymouth & Portland, 2.6% of the houses are second homes. Contrast that to many areas of Cornwall, where it's 40%. Weymouth may have problems, e.g. lack of fairy lights, but I'm not sure second home owners are a compelling target for negativity.[/p][/quote]Quite. I mean, it's not like there are 2.6% more local families that are homeless as a consequence, is it? JamesYoung
  • Score: -5

9:58pm Mon 7 Jul 14

Chav_Scum says...

Hippyhooker wrote:
Chav_Scum wrote:
I hear that, like the Land Registry building at the Granby, the Westwey House Job Centre building is incredibly under populated. Next door, the Court house is as much of an architectural eyesore on the harbourside as the current WP Council building is. Both buildings are only slightly less hideous than the eyesore messy junction which they neighbour. I take it Asda, despite their redevelopment, would still wish to move if given the opportunity. As stated above, the hostel really needs to go too. We have the Weymouth FC site up in the air, with the club being done over & looking for a new home, and a swimming pool that could ideally do with redeveloping as an all year round community centre & tourist attraction. A fabulous harbourside could be created to bring in the type of visitors our town wants & needs. PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE council can we get a forward thinking & COMPLETE plan of action on the whole site? This is a major opportunity to revamp the heart of our town, the idea to move the road back is brilliant, but all this needs to be investigated and overseen by those who are not in it to line their own pockets!
I didn't think it would be long until some idiot mentioned the Asda junction, were you one of the many that predicted there would be many deaths caused by it, and just how many accidents has there been there? ONE MINOR BUMP lol
No, I wasn't 'one of the many'. I said it was an ugly use of prime land. Who's the idiot?
[quote][p][bold]Hippyhooker[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Chav_Scum[/bold] wrote: I hear that, like the Land Registry building at the Granby, the Westwey House Job Centre building is incredibly under populated. Next door, the Court house is as much of an architectural eyesore on the harbourside as the current WP Council building is. Both buildings are only slightly less hideous than the eyesore messy junction which they neighbour. I take it Asda, despite their redevelopment, would still wish to move if given the opportunity. As stated above, the hostel really needs to go too. We have the Weymouth FC site up in the air, with the club being done over & looking for a new home, and a swimming pool that could ideally do with redeveloping as an all year round community centre & tourist attraction. A fabulous harbourside could be created to bring in the type of visitors our town wants & needs. PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE council can we get a forward thinking & COMPLETE plan of action on the whole site? This is a major opportunity to revamp the heart of our town, the idea to move the road back is brilliant, but all this needs to be investigated and overseen by those who are not in it to line their own pockets![/p][/quote]I didn't think it would be long until some idiot mentioned the Asda junction, were you one of the many that predicted there would be many deaths caused by it, and just how many accidents has there been there? ONE MINOR BUMP lol[/p][/quote]No, I wasn't 'one of the many'. I said it was an ugly use of prime land. Who's the idiot? Chav_Scum
  • Score: 3

10:07pm Mon 7 Jul 14

Chav_Scum says...

The issue of social housing / affordable housing / second homes is a complex one which I'm not sure can (or should) be dealt with at local or national level without dealing with the wider problems in the economy which effect our housing markets. It's not just a case of second home owners from London, we also have plenty of locals with 2 or more properties for 'pension' purposes.
The issue of social housing / affordable housing / second homes is a complex one which I'm not sure can (or should) be dealt with at local or national level without dealing with the wider problems in the economy which effect our housing markets. It's not just a case of second home owners from London, we also have plenty of locals with 2 or more properties for 'pension' purposes. Chav_Scum
  • Score: 3

7:38am Tue 8 Jul 14

Coming home says...

I'd like to point out that those people that buy the executive flats are the ones that pay the exorbitant council tax in full yet hardly use the council amenities that it's spent on. So don't forget that means they bring valuable spending money to the local community. The council know that which is why it will be more executive flats plus a bit of social housing for all the single teenage mums.
I'd like to point out that those people that buy the executive flats are the ones that pay the exorbitant council tax in full yet hardly use the council amenities that it's spent on. So don't forget that means they bring valuable spending money to the local community. The council know that which is why it will be more executive flats plus a bit of social housing for all the single teenage mums. Coming home
  • Score: 0

8:42am Tue 8 Jul 14

Speak Up1 says...

I predict more second homes for those who can afford to keep their boat in the harbor....few amenities used by local people during the winter so the bus company's etc can cut services back which in turn will not attract businesses into the area and the cycle goes on and on....

How about affordable housing for people living and working in the area and make that part of the selection process for buying any potential homes built there?
I predict more second homes for those who can afford to keep their boat in the harbor....few amenities used by local people during the winter so the bus company's etc can cut services back which in turn will not attract businesses into the area and the cycle goes on and on.... How about affordable housing for people living and working in the area and make that part of the selection process for buying any potential homes built there? Speak Up1
  • Score: -2

8:47am Tue 8 Jul 14

Speak Up1 says...

Coming home wrote:
I'd like to point out that those people that buy the executive flats are the ones that pay the exorbitant council tax in full yet hardly use the council amenities that it's spent on. So don't forget that means they bring valuable spending money to the local community. The council know that which is why it will be more executive flats plus a bit of social housing for all the single teenage mums.
And they can afford it, otherwise they would not be able to buy - it's their choice and if they don't like it get out and don't come back. There are young working families in our town who cannot afford to buy BECAUSE the market is twisted in favor of those lucky enough to be able to afford second homes, pay premium prices and the costs that come with them - this forces these working families to rent and so become trapped, unable to save and unable to move onto the property ladder.

Just because you can afford an executive summer home doesn't give you the right to bleat about the costs that come with it - or are we supposed to feel grateful to them! Pathetic point of view.
[quote][p][bold]Coming home[/bold] wrote: I'd like to point out that those people that buy the executive flats are the ones that pay the exorbitant council tax in full yet hardly use the council amenities that it's spent on. So don't forget that means they bring valuable spending money to the local community. The council know that which is why it will be more executive flats plus a bit of social housing for all the single teenage mums.[/p][/quote]And they can afford it, otherwise they would not be able to buy - it's their choice and if they don't like it get out and don't come back. There are young working families in our town who cannot afford to buy BECAUSE the market is twisted in favor of those lucky enough to be able to afford second homes, pay premium prices and the costs that come with them - this forces these working families to rent and so become trapped, unable to save and unable to move onto the property ladder. Just because you can afford an executive summer home doesn't give you the right to bleat about the costs that come with it - or are we supposed to feel grateful to them! Pathetic point of view. Speak Up1
  • Score: 2

10:53am Tue 8 Jul 14

JamesYoung says...

Coming home wrote:
I'd like to point out that those people that buy the executive flats are the ones that pay the exorbitant council tax in full yet hardly use the council amenities that it's spent on. So don't forget that means they bring valuable spending money to the local community. The council know that which is why it will be more executive flats plus a bit of social housing for all the single teenage mums.
I always enjoy seeing defences like this.
The fact is that the more demand for housing that there is an area, the higher the prices*. The higher the prices, the higher the rents and the higher the rents, the higher the housing benefit bill.
So these people may be paying £1500 a year in council tax, but you can bet that the cost to the local community of them occupying (or not occupying) that house is a lot more.
*Demand is itself a factor by lax lending practices and high income multiples, which are the real issues driving house prices.
[quote][p][bold]Coming home[/bold] wrote: I'd like to point out that those people that buy the executive flats are the ones that pay the exorbitant council tax in full yet hardly use the council amenities that it's spent on. So don't forget that means they bring valuable spending money to the local community. The council know that which is why it will be more executive flats plus a bit of social housing for all the single teenage mums.[/p][/quote]I always enjoy seeing defences like this. The fact is that the more demand for housing that there is an area, the higher the prices*. The higher the prices, the higher the rents and the higher the rents, the higher the housing benefit bill. So these people may be paying £1500 a year in council tax, but you can bet that the cost to the local community of them occupying (or not occupying) that house is a lot more. *Demand is itself a factor by lax lending practices and high income multiples, which are the real issues driving house prices. JamesYoung
  • Score: 1

4:32pm Tue 8 Jul 14

WykeReg says...

Whatever is built there I hope it is a more appropriate design and better build quality than the monstrosity put up at the back of the ASDA car park. After only a few years it is beginning to look like a slum-in-waiting. But it does have a stunning view -of the car park!! That must have put a premium on the price.
Whatever is built there I hope it is a more appropriate design and better build quality than the monstrosity put up at the back of the ASDA car park. After only a few years it is beginning to look like a slum-in-waiting. But it does have a stunning view -of the car park!! That must have put a premium on the price. WykeReg
  • Score: 1

8:33pm Tue 8 Jul 14

mark@greenhill says...

Regardless of the argument for social housing versus executive flats, cheap , low level social housing has no place on a prime harbourside site.
This town needs a beautiful and picturesque harbour side with some grand, and stunning architecture not the typical 2 up 2 down starter homes.
By all means build the social housing, god knows we need some, but it needs to be out of the town centre.
Regardless of the argument for social housing versus executive flats, cheap , low level social housing has no place on a prime harbourside site. This town needs a beautiful and picturesque harbour side with some grand, and stunning architecture not the typical 2 up 2 down starter homes. By all means build the social housing, god knows we need some, but it needs to be out of the town centre. mark@greenhill
  • Score: 2

12:24am Wed 9 Jul 14

Harpya Orkinus says...

WykeReg wrote:
Whatever is built there I hope it is a more appropriate design and better build quality than the monstrosity put up at the back of the ASDA car park. After only a few years it is beginning to look like a slum-in-waiting. But it does have a stunning view -of the car park!! That must have put a premium on the price.
Funny you should say that - I've always thought how nice it looked - ESPECIALLY when compared with that characterless RUBBISH along Commercial Road, and on the old council depot/library/Health Center sites !! The building upon which you cast aspersions always reminds me of some of the ancient dwellings in the SW of the US - Mesa Verde, Betatakin Ruin or maybe some of the less ancient 'pueblos' in the Hopi/Zuni country - which can't be bad. There is also a vague hint of the 1930s Art Deco period which, of course, occurred just a couple of decades before Good Taste ended in the 1960s..
And as for the 'top end' hotel some have hankered for - I thought the Royal rather filled that niche, as did the Gloucester at one time ?? Or should these just be trashed too, and replaced with some modern garbage such as is seen in places like Dubai ?? And what about the old Burdon Hotel ?? That was a fairly sizeable edifice, which could go upmarket with some serious internal refitting. A pity we had to lose our lovely old Victorian cast iron lamps along the Esplanade, though, to be replaced by that ghastly modern tat. Next thing you know, they'll be trashing the old seafront shelters and replacing them with stainless steel structures with green-tinted armored glass - yuck!! Those who are always shouting about 'family' resorts should remember that our old Victorian/Edwardian/
Georgian features are what lends the place some character, which the turistas probably find more appealing than the cheap-looking, uniform, brash modernity flaunted (no doubt at great expense) by lesser watering places....
[quote][p][bold]WykeReg[/bold] wrote: Whatever is built there I hope it is a more appropriate design and better build quality than the monstrosity put up at the back of the ASDA car park. After only a few years it is beginning to look like a slum-in-waiting. But it does have a stunning view -of the car park!! That must have put a premium on the price.[/p][/quote]Funny you should say that - I've always thought how nice it looked - ESPECIALLY when compared with that characterless RUBBISH along Commercial Road, and on the old council depot/library/Health Center sites !! The building upon which you cast aspersions always reminds me of some of the ancient dwellings in the SW of the US - Mesa Verde, Betatakin Ruin or maybe some of the less ancient 'pueblos' in the Hopi/Zuni country - which can't be bad. There is also a vague hint of the 1930s Art Deco period which, of course, occurred just a couple of decades before Good Taste ended in the 1960s.. And as for the 'top end' hotel some have hankered for - I thought the Royal rather filled that niche, as did the Gloucester at one time ?? Or should these just be trashed too, and replaced with some modern garbage such as is seen in places like Dubai ?? And what about the old Burdon Hotel ?? That was a fairly sizeable edifice, which could go upmarket with some serious internal refitting. A pity we had to lose our lovely old Victorian cast iron lamps along the Esplanade, though, to be replaced by that ghastly modern tat. Next thing you know, they'll be trashing the old seafront shelters and replacing them with stainless steel structures with green-tinted armored glass - yuck!! Those who are always shouting about 'family' resorts should remember that our old Victorian/Edwardian/ Georgian features are what lends the place some character, which the turistas probably find more appealing than the cheap-looking, uniform, brash modernity flaunted (no doubt at great expense) by lesser watering places.... Harpya Orkinus
  • Score: -1

1:12pm Wed 9 Jul 14

JamesYoung says...

Harpya Orkinus wrote:
WykeReg wrote:
Whatever is built there I hope it is a more appropriate design and better build quality than the monstrosity put up at the back of the ASDA car park. After only a few years it is beginning to look like a slum-in-waiting. But it does have a stunning view -of the car park!! That must have put a premium on the price.
Funny you should say that - I've always thought how nice it looked - ESPECIALLY when compared with that characterless RUBBISH along Commercial Road, and on the old council depot/library/Health Center sites !! The building upon which you cast aspersions always reminds me of some of the ancient dwellings in the SW of the US - Mesa Verde, Betatakin Ruin or maybe some of the less ancient 'pueblos' in the Hopi/Zuni country - which can't be bad. There is also a vague hint of the 1930s Art Deco period which, of course, occurred just a couple of decades before Good Taste ended in the 1960s..
And as for the 'top end' hotel some have hankered for - I thought the Royal rather filled that niche, as did the Gloucester at one time ?? Or should these just be trashed too, and replaced with some modern garbage such as is seen in places like Dubai ?? And what about the old Burdon Hotel ?? That was a fairly sizeable edifice, which could go upmarket with some serious internal refitting. A pity we had to lose our lovely old Victorian cast iron lamps along the Esplanade, though, to be replaced by that ghastly modern tat. Next thing you know, they'll be trashing the old seafront shelters and replacing them with stainless steel structures with green-tinted armored glass - yuck!! Those who are always shouting about 'family' resorts should remember that our old Victorian/Edwardian/

Georgian features are what lends the place some character, which the turistas probably find more appealing than the cheap-looking, uniform, brash modernity flaunted (no doubt at great expense) by lesser watering places....
I agree and the other point about hotels is this: if you want a grand hotel, you need people prepared to pay grand hotel rates.
With nightly rates for even an average chain hotel exceeding £100 a night or £700 a week, i personally don't think that there is much call for it, which is why the existing sea front hotels are looking a little grotty.
Hotels don't cater well for families so their utility is limited to singles and couples, which is not Weymouth's traditional summer demographic.
[quote][p][bold]Harpya Orkinus[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]WykeReg[/bold] wrote: Whatever is built there I hope it is a more appropriate design and better build quality than the monstrosity put up at the back of the ASDA car park. After only a few years it is beginning to look like a slum-in-waiting. But it does have a stunning view -of the car park!! That must have put a premium on the price.[/p][/quote]Funny you should say that - I've always thought how nice it looked - ESPECIALLY when compared with that characterless RUBBISH along Commercial Road, and on the old council depot/library/Health Center sites !! The building upon which you cast aspersions always reminds me of some of the ancient dwellings in the SW of the US - Mesa Verde, Betatakin Ruin or maybe some of the less ancient 'pueblos' in the Hopi/Zuni country - which can't be bad. There is also a vague hint of the 1930s Art Deco period which, of course, occurred just a couple of decades before Good Taste ended in the 1960s.. And as for the 'top end' hotel some have hankered for - I thought the Royal rather filled that niche, as did the Gloucester at one time ?? Or should these just be trashed too, and replaced with some modern garbage such as is seen in places like Dubai ?? And what about the old Burdon Hotel ?? That was a fairly sizeable edifice, which could go upmarket with some serious internal refitting. A pity we had to lose our lovely old Victorian cast iron lamps along the Esplanade, though, to be replaced by that ghastly modern tat. Next thing you know, they'll be trashing the old seafront shelters and replacing them with stainless steel structures with green-tinted armored glass - yuck!! Those who are always shouting about 'family' resorts should remember that our old Victorian/Edwardian/ Georgian features are what lends the place some character, which the turistas probably find more appealing than the cheap-looking, uniform, brash modernity flaunted (no doubt at great expense) by lesser watering places....[/p][/quote]I agree and the other point about hotels is this: if you want a grand hotel, you need people prepared to pay grand hotel rates. With nightly rates for even an average chain hotel exceeding £100 a night or £700 a week, i personally don't think that there is much call for it, which is why the existing sea front hotels are looking a little grotty. Hotels don't cater well for families so their utility is limited to singles and couples, which is not Weymouth's traditional summer demographic. JamesYoung
  • Score: -1

5:15pm Wed 9 Jul 14

WykeReg says...

Harpya Orkinus wrote:
WykeReg wrote:
Whatever is built there I hope it is a more appropriate design and better build quality than the monstrosity put up at the back of the ASDA car park. After only a few years it is beginning to look like a slum-in-waiting. But it does have a stunning view -of the car park!! That must have put a premium on the price.
Funny you should say that - I've always thought how nice it looked - ESPECIALLY when compared with that characterless RUBBISH along Commercial Road, and on the old council depot/library/Health Center sites !! The building upon which you cast aspersions always reminds me of some of the ancient dwellings in the SW of the US - Mesa Verde, Betatakin Ruin or maybe some of the less ancient 'pueblos' in the Hopi/Zuni country - which can't be bad. There is also a vague hint of the 1930s Art Deco period which, of course, occurred just a couple of decades before Good Taste ended in the 1960s..
And as for the 'top end' hotel some have hankered for - I thought the Royal rather filled that niche, as did the Gloucester at one time ?? Or should these just be trashed too, and replaced with some modern garbage such as is seen in places like Dubai ?? And what about the old Burdon Hotel ?? That was a fairly sizeable edifice, which could go upmarket with some serious internal refitting. A pity we had to lose our lovely old Victorian cast iron lamps along the Esplanade, though, to be replaced by that ghastly modern tat. Next thing you know, they'll be trashing the old seafront shelters and replacing them with stainless steel structures with green-tinted armored glass - yuck!! Those who are always shouting about 'family' resorts should remember that our old Victorian/Edwardian/

Georgian features are what lends the place some character, which the turistas probably find more appealing than the cheap-looking, uniform, brash modernity flaunted (no doubt at great expense) by lesser watering places....
The dwellings built by the ancient peoples of the SW states of the US are still there for us to admire and wonder about (Montezuma's Castle built by the Anasazi people is a particularly fine example). But the operative words are 'still there.' I doubt that any modern building like that piece of poorly-maintained awfulness behind ASDA will last a thousand years.

I do agree that what this town needs is to erect buildings that are in keeping with the architectural heritage that still struggles to survive. But that would require vision on the part of the council. I'm not holding my breath.
[quote][p][bold]Harpya Orkinus[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]WykeReg[/bold] wrote: Whatever is built there I hope it is a more appropriate design and better build quality than the monstrosity put up at the back of the ASDA car park. After only a few years it is beginning to look like a slum-in-waiting. But it does have a stunning view -of the car park!! That must have put a premium on the price.[/p][/quote]Funny you should say that - I've always thought how nice it looked - ESPECIALLY when compared with that characterless RUBBISH along Commercial Road, and on the old council depot/library/Health Center sites !! The building upon which you cast aspersions always reminds me of some of the ancient dwellings in the SW of the US - Mesa Verde, Betatakin Ruin or maybe some of the less ancient 'pueblos' in the Hopi/Zuni country - which can't be bad. There is also a vague hint of the 1930s Art Deco period which, of course, occurred just a couple of decades before Good Taste ended in the 1960s.. And as for the 'top end' hotel some have hankered for - I thought the Royal rather filled that niche, as did the Gloucester at one time ?? Or should these just be trashed too, and replaced with some modern garbage such as is seen in places like Dubai ?? And what about the old Burdon Hotel ?? That was a fairly sizeable edifice, which could go upmarket with some serious internal refitting. A pity we had to lose our lovely old Victorian cast iron lamps along the Esplanade, though, to be replaced by that ghastly modern tat. Next thing you know, they'll be trashing the old seafront shelters and replacing them with stainless steel structures with green-tinted armored glass - yuck!! Those who are always shouting about 'family' resorts should remember that our old Victorian/Edwardian/ Georgian features are what lends the place some character, which the turistas probably find more appealing than the cheap-looking, uniform, brash modernity flaunted (no doubt at great expense) by lesser watering places....[/p][/quote]The dwellings built by the ancient peoples of the SW states of the US are still there for us to admire and wonder about (Montezuma's Castle built by the Anasazi people is a particularly fine example). But the operative words are 'still there.' I doubt that any modern building like that piece of poorly-maintained awfulness behind ASDA will last a thousand years. I do agree that what this town needs is to erect buildings that are in keeping with the architectural heritage that still struggles to survive. But that would require vision on the part of the council. I'm not holding my breath. WykeReg
  • Score: 1

7:34pm Fri 11 Jul 14

Yellowcave says...

I seem to remember that there was a supply issue not long ago when it became obvious that we were, or would soon become, reliant on imported gas. The government at the time realised that as it was supplied online it could cripple the country immediately if the supply was cut. There was an incredulous statement at the time from the corridors of power to the effect that it was a shame that there was no way to store gas for later use!
I seem to remember that there was a supply issue not long ago when it became obvious that we were, or would soon become, reliant on imported gas. The government at the time realised that as it was supplied online it could cripple the country immediately if the supply was cut. There was an incredulous statement at the time from the corridors of power to the effect that it was a shame that there was no way to store gas for later use! Yellowcave
  • Score: 0

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