Coastguard round-up: Man attempts to sail to America, fishing boat caught, and boats capsize

Coastguard round-up: Man attempts to sail to America, fishing boat caught, and boats capsize

Coastguard round-up: Man attempts to sail to America, fishing boat caught, and boats capsize

First published in News
Last updated

A MAN was rescued from the sea after attempting to sail to America.

A lifeboat was launched to a 12ft sailing dinghyon Saturday.

Concern was raised for the vessel’s safety by a passing yacht, named Shabeem, at around 4.17pm.

It was established that the dinghy’s skipper was seasick.

Upon arriving, the Bulgarian national was reluctant to accept help back to Christchurch Harbour but was eventually persuaded to do so.

He was met by Southbourne Coastguard Rescue Officers, Dorset Police and an ambulance once ashore. He was taken to Bournemouth Hospital for treatment after appearing to suffer from the cold.

Elsewhere, a fishing vessel reported trouble near Portland Bill after being snagged by a French fishing vessel.

Gerry Ann C, which had two people on board, alerted authorities at around 3.39pm.

The French boat was pulling Gerry Ann C sideways but the language barrier prevented them from understanding what had happened.

Portland Coastguard informed French coastguards and the two vessels soon resolved the situation.

Meanwhile, a boat was spotted drifting with no people on board at Studland Bay.

Vessels Penny Farthing, Springtide, and Woscall reported the boat, named Wave One, drifting from an anchorage at around 2.11pm.

A boat named Pleilb investigated and confirmed there were no people on board. The boat was collected and returned to secure anchorage in Studland Bay. The owners were located in their dinghy.

Elsewhere, a 27ft yacht required help after reporting smoke coming from the engine and a seasick crew.

The yacht, named Degage, had two people on board. Weymouth RNLI Lifeboat was alerted at around 6.12pm.

The boat was found approximately 3 nautical miles south of Kimmeridge Bay.

The boat had also blown out her main sail and was struggling to make headway in rough seas using only the small foresail.

Weymouth Lifeboat safely towed the vessel back to Weymouth to be met by Wyke Coastguard Rescue Officers.

Poole Coastguard Rescue Team joined forces with Dorset Police to help locate a 67-year-old man who went missing after a day trip to Sandbanks.

They were alerted at around 8pm. The man had been on a trip with a residential care home based in London. He was soon found by officers in Poole Park.

Soon after this, a member of the public reported seeing an unusual vessel secured to a buoy in Christchurch Bay.

Southbourne Coastguard Rescue Officers responded to the incident at around 8.09pm. A broadcast was made and a responding vessel confirmed the craft was an Atlantic rowing vessel with one person board.

He was staying for the night to test his equipment.

Two people were reported to have taken a canoe out to sea in dangerous conditions following a beach party on Swanage Beach.

Swanage Coastguard Rescue Officers investigated the report at around 9pm.

The Coastguards found two men from the party had been fishing in the canoe but had returned safely.

Meanwhile, coastguards dealt with a number of capsizing boats throughout the day.

Poole RNLI Inshore Lifeboat assisted a catamaran after it capsized with people in the water near Sandbanks.

They recovered two people from the water and took them ashore to Poole RNLI Lifeguards at around 2.45pm.

The catamaran dinghy was later recovered but was found to have suffered a split hull.

Later that afternoon, a sailing dinghy with one person on board capsized in the water at Wills Cut, Poole Harbour.

The incident happened at around 4.15pm.

After recovering the person to Baiter Park, Poole RNLI Inshore Lifeboat attended another incident before returning later to recover the dinghy.

Four people were recovered from the water off Salterns Marina, Poole Harbour, less than a quarter of an hour later.

At around 4.27pm, two people from a capsized dinghy and two from a capsized jetski required assistance. The incident was reported by a boat named Aztec.

Poole RNLI Inshore Lifeboat recovered the people from the water to Baiter Park where they were met Poole Coastguards. The dinghy and jetski were recovered later.

An hour or so later, Poole RNLI Inshore Lifeboat were needed again, rescuing two people who were in the water from a capsized Hobie Cat in Poole Harbour.

The incident happened at around 5.37pm. Coastguards helped return the two people and their vessel ashore and were met by Poole Coastguards.

Comments (6)

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11:03am Sun 17 Aug 14

arlbergbahn says...

Oh why oh why isn't there some kind of licence or license you have to have to take charge of a boat on the high seas?
Oh why oh why isn't there some kind of licence or license you have to have to take charge of a boat on the high seas? arlbergbahn
  • Score: 5

1:24pm Sun 17 Aug 14

Panyan says...

If my car broke down on a journey I would not expect a free recovery . As a precaution I have the option to pay a monthly fee to be a member of a recovery company . So do boat owners have a free service.?
If my car broke down on a journey I would not expect a free recovery . As a precaution I have the option to pay a monthly fee to be a member of a recovery company . So do boat owners have a free service.? Panyan
  • Score: 2

6:00pm Sun 17 Aug 14

FerryFan says...

This chap was trying to sail to America - the other day someone was going to swim to the Isle of Wight. Something in the water around here is it - and not just them....
This chap was trying to sail to America - the other day someone was going to swim to the Isle of Wight. Something in the water around here is it - and not just them.... FerryFan
  • Score: 0

6:07am Mon 18 Aug 14

PORTLAND ROVER says...

If a boat runs out of Fuel... Then I think the owners should pay when a lifeboat is called out... But people could put their lives in danger if they were in two minds to call a lifeboat because they would have to pay when they were actually in serious danger of losing their lives.

I don't think any lifeboat-man/woman would want that!
If a boat runs out of Fuel... Then I think the owners should pay when a lifeboat is called out... But people could put their lives in danger if they were in two minds to call a lifeboat because they would have to pay when they were actually in serious danger of losing their lives. I don't think any lifeboat-man/woman would want that! PORTLAND ROVER
  • Score: 3

8:33am Mon 18 Aug 14

notweymouth says...

People donate willingly to the RNLI and are grateful when they need it. I for one would make a substantial donation if I were ever to call on their services.
People donate willingly to the RNLI and are grateful when they need it. I for one would make a substantial donation if I were ever to call on their services. notweymouth
  • Score: 1

1:26am Thu 21 Aug 14

slayerofsacredcows says...

If a car breaks down, it is inconvenient but there is not usually an immediate threat to life. If a boat breaks down, it doesn't just stay where it is; it may drift out to sea. If people are in the water, which is cold in Britain, they can quickly suffer from hypothermia and be at risk of drowning from inhaled spray. The code of the sea is like the code of the mountains, all vessels are obliged to help other vessels in distress. The RNLI embody the finest traditions of this code; they do not charge, but of course welcome donations.
Plenty of training for boating is available (some of it is even free), but it is not obligatory for users of private boats. Most sailors are only too happy to offer advice, if asked, but there will always be people that do not evaluate the risks and do not seek advice.
If a car breaks down, it is inconvenient but there is not usually an immediate threat to life. If a boat breaks down, it doesn't just stay where it is; it may drift out to sea. If people are in the water, which is cold in Britain, they can quickly suffer from hypothermia and be at risk of drowning from inhaled spray. The code of the sea is like the code of the mountains, all vessels are obliged to help other vessels in distress. The RNLI embody the finest traditions of this code; they do not charge, but of course welcome donations. Plenty of training for boating is available (some of it is even free), but it is not obligatory for users of private boats. Most sailors are only too happy to offer advice, if asked, but there will always be people that do not evaluate the risks and do not seek advice. slayerofsacredcows
  • Score: 0

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