The day the county ground to a standstill

Dorset Echo: SNOW LATEST:  The day the county ground to a standstill SNOW LATEST: The day the county ground to a standstill

DORSET and New Forest roads turned to chaos yesterday after another wave of ice and snow hit the region - with more possible today.

Gritters stuck to main roads in a bid to keep the area moving, but there were dozens of accidents.

The A350 was very icy; several cars left the road and two articulated lorries got stuck.

Police closed off hilly areas around Ashley Cross due to the ice and snow.

Alder Road in Poole was just passable, while Ashley Road was blocked after buses got stuck.

A lorry jack-knifed outside Poole Grammar School and another was reported stuck near the Bear Cross roundabout.

The A31 at Sturminster Marshall was also barely passable. By mid-morning Bournemouth was gridlocked by icy roads.

Around two inches of snow caused treacherous conditions on Purbeck roads.

Cars and HGVs were reported stuck in snow between Woodbury Cross and Bloxworth.

Adastral Road in Poole was closed due to stranded buses - which led Wilts and Dorset to suspend services - and roads in Corfe Mullen were also dangerous.

The A37 Dorchester to Yeovil road and the A354 from Dorchester to Weymouth Ridgeway were shut as well as the A35 at Bere Regis.

By mid-morning 100 cars were stranded on the Puddletown by-pass.

There were several accidents in the New Forest, including one at Everton near Lymington where a Renault saloon partly demolished a bus shelter on the A337. A few hundred yards to the west a Ford Escort driver had come to grief in a ditch.

A car was left with a buckled wheel after a crash on Matchams Lane at around 1.30pm.

South West Trains ran a revised timetable on Monday and will do on Tuesday. Bournemouth Airport was closed until around 3.30pm.

Passengers boarded their Thomson flight to Las Palmas around 3.30pm but an EasyJet flight to Geneva was cancelled.

One commuter from Poole, Debbie Lamb, said: "My journey took about an hour from Branksome to the centre of Bournemouth, normally a journey of about 15 mins."

Keith Freeman, from Southbourne, said: "Traffic was barely moving in places, particularly in Iford Lane and on the Wessex Way. There were also a couple of broken down vehicles getting in people's way."

William Brewer added: "It took me more than two hours to get from Poole to Bournemouth.

"There were long queues around the Civic Centre roundabout in Poole, and Ashley Cross was pretty icy."

Nikki West spent three and a half hours driving to work in Bournemouth from Wareham. She said: "Wareham was completely white, you couldn't see the road. But we're all used to driving with ice out that way, so it wasn't too bad.

"The A35 dual carriageway was covered, and from Canford Heath onwards it was pretty much a standstill."

The A350 between Upton and Sturminster Marshall was in a terrible condition yesterday morning and did not appear to have been gritted.

The Echo helped push a builders' van out of a ditch on Beacon Hill, where the peak was sheer ice, and traffic came to a standstill.

One of the men said: "We had been overtaking people who had stopped then we just felt it skid and go."

Two other cars got stuck in the next 20 minutes on the same stretch, and two articulated lorries and a bus had already been helped out.

Shane Hansford, 16, was using his tractor to pull cars up the hill, said: "I've never seen the road like this."

Police had blocked the road off by around 12noon at the Sturminster Marshall roundabout.

A traffic officer, walking up to a lorry stranded in a ditch near Old Market Road, said: "I can't comment on how many crashes we've had because they are coming in thick and fast."

Comments (12)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

5:55pm Mon 20 Dec 10

Markymash says...

I used to live in Bournemouth and remember the grind to a standstill couple of inches snow we used to get. I now live in North Wales at the foot of Snowdon. We had two feet of the stuff last week and it is still that deep now. It will not melt for some time to come, yet life goes on as before. What would happen if Bournemouth had this much? It would then be "Chaos" not a minor issue that it is now.
I used to live in Bournemouth and remember the grind to a standstill couple of inches snow we used to get. I now live in North Wales at the foot of Snowdon. We had two feet of the stuff last week and it is still that deep now. It will not melt for some time to come, yet life goes on as before. What would happen if Bournemouth had this much? It would then be "Chaos" not a minor issue that it is now. Markymash

6:23pm Mon 20 Dec 10

KLH says...

Why can't shops, instead of putting Christmas stuff out in October, start putting snow related stuff out. Sure bags of grit, salt, snow shovels grippers for shoes, and various items related to heavy snow and ice would be more appropriate than Christmas cards and decorations. Things that people don't REALLY need to buy unti; December.
Why can't shops, instead of putting Christmas stuff out in October, start putting snow related stuff out. Sure bags of grit, salt, snow shovels grippers for shoes, and various items related to heavy snow and ice would be more appropriate than Christmas cards and decorations. Things that people don't REALLY need to buy unti; December. KLH

11:03pm Mon 20 Dec 10

jobsworthwatch says...

Markymash wrote:
I used to live in Bournemouth and remember the grind to a standstill couple of inches snow we used to get. I now live in North Wales at the foot of Snowdon. We had two feet of the stuff last week and it is still that deep now. It will not melt for some time to come, yet life goes on as before. What would happen if Bournemouth had this much? It would then be "Chaos" not a minor issue that it is now.
I remember 62/63 in Bmth, the town coped far better then than now.
[quote][p][bold]Markymash[/bold] wrote: I used to live in Bournemouth and remember the grind to a standstill couple of inches snow we used to get. I now live in North Wales at the foot of Snowdon. We had two feet of the stuff last week and it is still that deep now. It will not melt for some time to come, yet life goes on as before. What would happen if Bournemouth had this much? It would then be "Chaos" not a minor issue that it is now.[/p][/quote]I remember 62/63 in Bmth, the town coped far better then than now. jobsworthwatch

12:52am Tue 21 Dec 10

kangman2012 says...

jobsworthwatch wrote:
Markymash wrote: I used to live in Bournemouth and remember the grind to a standstill couple of inches snow we used to get. I now live in North Wales at the foot of Snowdon. We had two feet of the stuff last week and it is still that deep now. It will not melt for some time to come, yet life goes on as before. What would happen if Bournemouth had this much? It would then be "Chaos" not a minor issue that it is now.
I remember 62/63 in Bmth, the town coped far better then than now.
I had a great laugh tonight. For my sins I have a part-time delivery job with the local "currie-house". At 7pm the main roads were clear but the side roads were "slushy and slippery" at best. Having just dropped off an order after skidding and sliding to their front door the lady paying said that those lovely people who let "you shop and they drop" had cancelled their service for the night. What an absolute joke. Seems to me that those with jobs in this recession will find any excuse not to work whilst those out of a full-time position will shift heaven and earth to earn a few bob. Maybe emloyers should re-evaluate their criteria regarding recruitment...!
[quote][p][bold]jobsworthwatch[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Markymash[/bold] wrote: I used to live in Bournemouth and remember the grind to a standstill couple of inches snow we used to get. I now live in North Wales at the foot of Snowdon. We had two feet of the stuff last week and it is still that deep now. It will not melt for some time to come, yet life goes on as before. What would happen if Bournemouth had this much? It would then be "Chaos" not a minor issue that it is now.[/p][/quote]I remember 62/63 in Bmth, the town coped far better then than now.[/p][/quote]I had a great laugh tonight. For my sins I have a part-time delivery job with the local "currie-house". At 7pm the main roads were clear but the side roads were "slushy and slippery" at best. Having just dropped off an order after skidding and sliding to their front door the lady paying said that those lovely people who let "you shop and they drop" had cancelled their service for the night. What an absolute joke. Seems to me that those with jobs in this recession will find any excuse not to work whilst those out of a full-time position will shift heaven and earth to earn a few bob. Maybe emloyers should re-evaluate their criteria regarding recruitment...! kangman2012

8:29am Tue 21 Dec 10

Syvia Weaver says...

Markymash wrote:
I used to live in Bournemouth and remember the grind to a standstill couple of inches snow we used to get. I now live in North Wales at the foot of Snowdon. We had two feet of the stuff last week and it is still that deep now. It will not melt for some time to come, yet life goes on as before. What would happen if Bournemouth had this much? It would then be "Chaos" not a minor issue that it is now.
But nothing goes on, anyway, at the foot of Snowdon....
[quote][p][bold]Markymash[/bold] wrote: I used to live in Bournemouth and remember the grind to a standstill couple of inches snow we used to get. I now live in North Wales at the foot of Snowdon. We had two feet of the stuff last week and it is still that deep now. It will not melt for some time to come, yet life goes on as before. What would happen if Bournemouth had this much? It would then be "Chaos" not a minor issue that it is now.[/p][/quote]But nothing goes on, anyway, at the foot of Snowdon.... Syvia Weaver

10:19am Tue 21 Dec 10

benjamin says...

Those of us that remember the winters of 1963 and even worse 1947, wonder what all the is about. That was in the Cotswolds too. Not here in the balmy south!
Those of us that remember the winters of 1963 and even worse 1947, wonder what all the is about. That was in the Cotswolds too. Not here in the balmy south! benjamin

11:16am Tue 21 Dec 10

jobsworthwatch says...

benjamin wrote:
Those of us that remember the winters of 1963 and even worse 1947, wonder what all the is about. That was in the Cotswolds too. Not here in the balmy south!
We did have 10 ins of snow and drifting here in balmy Bournemouth, it started Boxing day and the snow did not go until March.
Then, living at Ensbury Park, Our house had no central heating only a coal fire, no insulation, we were frozen out for six weeks and had to walk 1/4 mile to fetch water, We would wake up in the morning to thick ice on the inside of our bedroom windows and we were 4 weeks late going back to school. Wonder how todays softies would stand up to that, so far we've got off lightly!
[quote][p][bold]benjamin[/bold] wrote: Those of us that remember the winters of 1963 and even worse 1947, wonder what all the is about. That was in the Cotswolds too. Not here in the balmy south![/p][/quote]We did have 10 ins of snow and drifting here in balmy Bournemouth, it started Boxing day and the snow did not go until March. Then, living at Ensbury Park, Our house had no central heating only a coal fire, no insulation, we were frozen out for six weeks and had to walk 1/4 mile to fetch water, We would wake up in the morning to thick ice on the inside of our bedroom windows and we were 4 weeks late going back to school. Wonder how todays softies would stand up to that, so far we've got off lightly! jobsworthwatch

11:53am Tue 21 Dec 10

BottomE says...

jobsworthwatch wrote:
Markymash wrote: I used to live in Bournemouth and remember the grind to a standstill couple of inches snow we used to get. I now live in North Wales at the foot of Snowdon. We had two feet of the stuff last week and it is still that deep now. It will not melt for some time to come, yet life goes on as before. What would happen if Bournemouth had this much? It would then be "Chaos" not a minor issue that it is now.
I remember 62/63 in Bmth, the town coped far better then than now.
Its just that we are all a lot more pampered and delicate these days. Stop whinging and get on with it.
[quote][p][bold]jobsworthwatch[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Markymash[/bold] wrote: I used to live in Bournemouth and remember the grind to a standstill couple of inches snow we used to get. I now live in North Wales at the foot of Snowdon. We had two feet of the stuff last week and it is still that deep now. It will not melt for some time to come, yet life goes on as before. What would happen if Bournemouth had this much? It would then be "Chaos" not a minor issue that it is now.[/p][/quote]I remember 62/63 in Bmth, the town coped far better then than now.[/p][/quote]Its just that we are all a lot more pampered and delicate these days. Stop whinging and get on with it. BottomE

3:43pm Tue 21 Dec 10

soapboxdave says...

jobsworthwatch wrote:
benjamin wrote:
Those of us that remember the winters of 1963 and even worse 1947, wonder what all the is about. That was in the Cotswolds too. Not here in the balmy south!
We did have 10 ins of snow and drifting here in balmy Bournemouth, it started Boxing day and the snow did not go until March.
Then, living at Ensbury Park, Our house had no central heating only a coal fire, no insulation, we were frozen out for six weeks and had to walk 1/4 mile to fetch water, We would wake up in the morning to thick ice on the inside of our bedroom windows and we were 4 weeks late going back to school. Wonder how todays softies would stand up to that, so far we've got off lightly!
Most of this is caused by todays nanny state and balmy health and safety regulations, everybody is scared stiff of being taken to court if someone slips over.
The recent minor snowfall has bought the country to a standstill and even though the snow has mostly gone the country is still standing still, none of this in 1963, we just made the bet of it and got on with our lives.
The whole British way of life has been reduced to millions upon milions of cissies and whingers.
[quote][p][bold]jobsworthwatch[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]benjamin[/bold] wrote: Those of us that remember the winters of 1963 and even worse 1947, wonder what all the is about. That was in the Cotswolds too. Not here in the balmy south![/p][/quote]We did have 10 ins of snow and drifting here in balmy Bournemouth, it started Boxing day and the snow did not go until March. Then, living at Ensbury Park, Our house had no central heating only a coal fire, no insulation, we were frozen out for six weeks and had to walk 1/4 mile to fetch water, We would wake up in the morning to thick ice on the inside of our bedroom windows and we were 4 weeks late going back to school. Wonder how todays softies would stand up to that, so far we've got off lightly![/p][/quote]Most of this is caused by todays nanny state and balmy health and safety regulations, everybody is scared stiff of being taken to court if someone slips over. The recent minor snowfall has bought the country to a standstill and even though the snow has mostly gone the country is still standing still, none of this in 1963, we just made the bet of it and got on with our lives. The whole British way of life has been reduced to millions upon milions of cissies and whingers. soapboxdave

4:00pm Tue 21 Dec 10

captsanders says...

Schools shut, airports closed, trains not running, buses stopped, hundreds off work, panic buying, petrol shortages, it wasn't as bad as this during the war, people got on with their lives and overcome difficult times and adapted to the problems they faced, now everybody gives up, what a bunch of no hoper's the population of this once great country have become.
Schools shut, airports closed, trains not running, buses stopped, hundreds off work, panic buying, petrol shortages, it wasn't as bad as this during the war, people got on with their lives and overcome difficult times and adapted to the problems they faced, now everybody gives up, what a bunch of no hoper's the population of this once great country have become. captsanders

10:27pm Tue 21 Dec 10

pinoso318 says...

Most of this is caused by todays nanny state and balmy health and safety regulations, everybody is scared stiff of being taken to court if someone slips over.
The recent minor snowfall has bought the country to a standstill and even though the snow has mostly gone the country is still standing still, none of this in 1963, we just made the bet of it and got on with our lives.
The whole British way of life has been reduced to millions upon milions of cissies and whingers.

I so so so agree. the supposed new generation have no idea. Alder hills jammed yesterday... the result of none of the local drivers being able to drive in ice or snow condititions. I had traversed it 3 times up to 7.15. I had been driving since 3.30 am and through a great snow shower at 6.45 with no probs until the public came out. Then they all complain. Wait till the summer then it will be tooo hot lol
Most of this is caused by todays nanny state and balmy health and safety regulations, everybody is scared stiff of being taken to court if someone slips over. The recent minor snowfall has bought the country to a standstill and even though the snow has mostly gone the country is still standing still, none of this in 1963, we just made the bet of it and got on with our lives. The whole British way of life has been reduced to millions upon milions of cissies and whingers. I so so so agree. the supposed new generation have no idea. Alder hills jammed yesterday... the result of none of the local drivers being able to drive in ice or snow condititions. I had traversed it 3 times up to 7.15. I had been driving since 3.30 am and through a great snow shower at 6.45 with no probs until the public came out. Then they all complain. Wait till the summer then it will be tooo hot lol pinoso318

1:55am Wed 22 Dec 10

slightlyperturbed says...

Really..come on? 1962/3?? There were the same number of cars and other vehicles on the roads then??? There were the same population densities then??? There was as much community and work-place demographics then as now??? Come on to allthose rose-tinted people. You didn't cope as well - you just coped - like people do now. And as for the war years. Well, there was a lot more of 'collectivisation' then because... there was a war on. And if there was again (hopefully not) then you'd see the population pulling together just like it did then. Stop moaning people.
Really..come on? 1962/3?? There were the same number of cars and other vehicles on the roads then??? There were the same population densities then??? There was as much community and work-place demographics then as now??? Come on to allthose rose-tinted people. You didn't cope as well - you just coped - like people do now. And as for the war years. Well, there was a lot more of 'collectivisation' then because... there was a war on. And if there was again (hopefully not) then you'd see the population pulling together just like it did then. Stop moaning people. slightlyperturbed

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree