Next time grit pavements in Dorset says pressure group

Bournemouth wakes up to snow last year

Bournemouth wakes up to snow last year

First published in News by

AS the temperature lowers and winter sets in, a national charity is calling for councils across the country to keep pavements, as well as roads, well gritted and cleared.

Living Streets wants councils to keep pavements ice free, to prevent a repetition of the 16,000 snow and ice-related hospital admissions in England during the winter of 2009-2010.

Snow and ice cause problems each winter across the UK, but whilst roads are routinely gritted, pavements can often be left untreated, proving dangerous for pedestrians.

Cllr Michael Filer, cabinet member for transport and technical services at Bournemouth council, said: “Maintaining the road network is a top priority and vital to keeping the public safe.

“When resources allow, we try to make sure that pavements in town centres, approaches to schools and areas at bus stops are cleared of snow.”

A Borough of Poole Council spokesperson, said: “We don’t routinely grit pavements, as we have a set network of priority routes that we cover.

“However in the case of severe weather, where gritting lorries may not be able to go onto these routes, the gritters would be re-deployed to the main areas of footfall, such as the town centre, and this would be hand-gritted.

“We encourage people to use the grit bins on the streets, which can be used on pavements and on the highways and roads. However, this is not for private use ie on residents’ driveways.”

A Dorset County Council spokesperson said: “When resources allow we will try to make sure that footways in town centres, approaches to schools and areas at bus stops are cleared of snow to keep conditions safe for pedestrians.

“We are working with town and district councils, so that they can deploy their own resources to deal with shopping precincts and footways in urban areas.

“People using areas affected by snow and ice also have responsibility to be careful themselves and full details of the Snow Code can be found at direct.gov.uk”

The winter of 2009-10 brought about 18 times more snow and ice related hospital admissions than that of 2008-09 and a cost to the country of around £42million.

Living Streets says that councils have a legal duty to ensure that safe movement on the highway, including on pavements, is not endangered by snow or ice.

For more information on Living Streets’ initiative, go to livingstreets.org.uk/icy

Comments (6)

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4:28pm Wed 7 Dec 11

P Barker says...

Last year I walked to walk a number of time as the roads were two bad for 2 wheels. Some people had cleared the pavement outside their houses, but 95% had not. Rather than expecting the council to grit everything, surely in extreme weather we should all do our bit and clear our piece of pavement ourselves ?
Last year I walked to walk a number of time as the roads were two bad for 2 wheels. Some people had cleared the pavement outside their houses, but 95% had not. Rather than expecting the council to grit everything, surely in extreme weather we should all do our bit and clear our piece of pavement ourselves ? P Barker
  • Score: 0

8:34pm Wed 7 Dec 11

dinkie123 says...

P Barker wrote:
Last year I walked to walk a number of time as the roads were two bad for 2 wheels. Some people had cleared the pavement outside their houses, but 95% had not. Rather than expecting the council to grit everything, surely in extreme weather we should all do our bit and clear our piece of pavement ourselves ?
Some people don't have the abilities to do this. I actually think it's better to walk on the snow than ice. I am currently living in Scotland, and with the recent snowfall we had, they did use some special kind of salt that melted the snow when it fell on it. However, this still didnt prevent the pavements from being too slippery. As the south is getting more ice and snow, compared to previous years, maybe people should start investing in all season car tyres, or snow tyres/chains, and sensible footwear. The council can't be expected to do everything, it would cost far too much, and in reflection of this, council tax would go up. I'd rather buy a £20 pair of snow boots/shoes than pay extra council tax!
[quote][p][bold]P Barker[/bold] wrote: Last year I walked to walk a number of time as the roads were two bad for 2 wheels. Some people had cleared the pavement outside their houses, but 95% had not. Rather than expecting the council to grit everything, surely in extreme weather we should all do our bit and clear our piece of pavement ourselves ?[/p][/quote]Some people don't have the abilities to do this. I actually think it's better to walk on the snow than ice. I am currently living in Scotland, and with the recent snowfall we had, they did use some special kind of salt that melted the snow when it fell on it. However, this still didnt prevent the pavements from being too slippery. As the south is getting more ice and snow, compared to previous years, maybe people should start investing in all season car tyres, or snow tyres/chains, and sensible footwear. The council can't be expected to do everything, it would cost far too much, and in reflection of this, council tax would go up. I'd rather buy a £20 pair of snow boots/shoes than pay extra council tax! dinkie123
  • Score: 0

12:42am Thu 8 Dec 11

bubbles10 says...

And also not just the main roads, more accidents were caused trying to get out of side roads!! Including my car sliding out straight into traffic in Winton high street!! Scared me to death and luckily everyone was driving slow so it gave my car chance to slow down and stop on its own. Please grit the side roads Council.
And also not just the main roads, more accidents were caused trying to get out of side roads!! Including my car sliding out straight into traffic in Winton high street!! Scared me to death and luckily everyone was driving slow so it gave my car chance to slow down and stop on its own. Please grit the side roads Council. bubbles10
  • Score: 0

12:50am Thu 8 Dec 11

billd766 says...

In Germany it is mandatory to clear the pavement of snow and ice outside your house and most people will clear their neighbours part as well if they are unable to do so themselves.
In Germany it is mandatory to clear the pavement of snow and ice outside your house and most people will clear their neighbours part as well if they are unable to do so themselves. billd766
  • Score: 0

12:50am Thu 8 Dec 11

billd766 says...

In Germany it is mandatory to clear the pavement of snow and ice outside your house and most people will clear their neighbours part as well if they are unable to do so themselves.
In Germany it is mandatory to clear the pavement of snow and ice outside your house and most people will clear their neighbours part as well if they are unable to do so themselves. billd766
  • Score: 0

8:39am Thu 8 Dec 11

upyourpipe says...

This comes up every year along with the extremely grey area of being sued if you clear the pavement outside your house and somebody slips up.
We used to do this years ago before the compensation culture that we live in today, it needs to be stated without doubt that if we clear the pavement we wont be sued in the case of somebody going a*** over t**.
This comes up every year along with the extremely grey area of being sued if you clear the pavement outside your house and somebody slips up. We used to do this years ago before the compensation culture that we live in today, it needs to be stated without doubt that if we clear the pavement we wont be sued in the case of somebody going a*** over t**. upyourpipe
  • Score: 0

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